The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing Sugar found 82 posts

Guns on Mount Defiance

Discussions about the American evacuation of Mount Independence and Fort Ticonderoga on the night of July 5, 1777 frequently address the question: could shot... The post Guns on Mount Defiance appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Review: 1764: The First Year of the American Revolution

BOOK REVIEW: 1764: The First Year of the American Revolutionby Ken Shumate (Yardley, PA: Westholme, 2021) When did the Revolution begin? This seemingly simple... The post Review: 1764: The First Year of the American Revolution appeared first on Journal...

Observations on Several Acts of Parliament

The Townshend Revenue Act of 1767 awoke Americans to the fact that import duties for the purpose of revenue were taxes just as much... The post Observations on Several Acts of Parliament appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“Stories of women hatching financial plans”

Sara T. Damiano, author of the new book To Her Credit: Women, Finance, and the Law in Eighteenth-Century New England Cities, shared some reflections on her research on the Johns Hopkins University Press blog: In places like colonial Boston, MA and Newport,...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jun 2021

The Latest in the JAR Book Series is Now Available

“The sad story of colonial oppression commenced in the year 1764. Great Britain then adopted new regulations respecting her colonies, which, after disturbing the... The post The Latest in the JAR Book Series is Now Available appeared first on Journal...

Capt. Dobel at Home and on the Far Side of the World

Except for several months as a Continental Navy lieutenant under Capt. John Manley, which ended badly, Joseph Dobel appears to have spent the Revolutionary War ashore in Boston. Certainly when he was in charge of confining suspected enemies of the state...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Apr 2021

“Strict Examination into the Affair of taring, feathering & carting Owen Richards”

Yesterday’s posting quoted two accounts of the assault on Customs employee Owen Richards on 18 May 1770. Richards and a colleague had caught a ship’s captain from Connecticut trying to sneak in undeclared barrels of sugar. They refused a bribe...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Apr 2021

Object Lessons: Co-Creating an Exhibition with School Pupils and the German Maritime Museum

One ear-achingly chilly day in February 2020, forty-odd pupils from secondary schools in Oldenburg and Neu Wulmsdorf, three teachers and I descended on the German Maritime Museum (DSM) in Bremerhaven. Our mission? To explore the museum’s extensive...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 1 Apr 2021

Tea: The Most Normal Thing in the World?

Yaela van Oel, Pieternel Pompe, Pablo Kamsteeg, and Joska BergAlfa Academy Next to water and coffee, tea is the most preferred and imbibed drink on earth. People drink it when they get together, as a moment to calm down or wake up. In this blog we take...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 2 Mar 2021

Golden State: Recipes and Memory

Amanda Elise Herbert and Annette Elise Herbert How do recipes make memories, and how do we remember the methods, ingredients, and techniques that go into making a dish, a piece of technology, a work of art, a scientific method? Memory is a powerful force,...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Feb 2021

Press Coverage of the Owen Richards Riot

On 21 May 1770, Green and Russell’s Boston Post-Boy reported: Last Friday Night Owen Richards, one of the Tidesmen belonging to the Custom-House, was Tarred, Feathered and Carted thro’ the Town for several hours, for having as ’tis...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Dec 2020

“I believe they are a smuggling”

With less than two weeks left in 2020, there are still some significant events in 1770 that I missed discussing on their Sestercentennials, so I’m trying to catch up. The first of those events took place on 18 May and centered on Owen Richards,...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Dec 2020

Sulfur of Saturn

 The Roman Goddess Ops, 'sweet'-heart (and wife)of Saturn, Peter Paul Rubens c. 1630,“Abundance (Abundantia).” [1]Antonio Neri’s 1612 book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria, devotes an entire chapter to making artificial...
From: Conciatore on 16 Dec 2020

Exploring London’s Intoxicating Spaces Through Mudlarking

The River Thames as it flows through London is tidal, meaning twice per day part of the riverbed is exposed for a few hours. This area, known as the Thames foreshore, is a rich archive of (among other things) the remnants of two millennia of the city’s...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 2 Dec 2020

Å Community Discussion about Faneuil Hall

Last month Martin Blatt and David J. Harris wrote an essay in Commonwealth Magazine inviting a public discussion of whether to rename Faneuil Hall. They said:We call upon the city to engage in an expansive community process to decide two issues in sequence—first,...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Sep 2020

CFP: Intoxicating Spaces: Global and Comparative Perspectives

An international conference organised and funded by the HERA research project Intoxicating Spaces: The Impact of New Intoxicants in Europe, 1600–1850, a collaboration between the University of Sheffield, the University of Oldenburg, the University...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 28 Aug 2020

“Material Culture of Sugar” Webinar from Historic Deerfield, 26 Sept.

Way back in April, Historic Deerfield was going to host a one-day forum on sugar in early New England culture. But then people recognized the Covid-19 virus had started to spread in this country, and institutions postponed their public events for a few...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Aug 2020

Intoxicating Spaces in the Time of Plague

In this brief vlog I discuss how our project has responded to the challenges posed by COVID-19 and lockdown, and reflect on the historical relationship between pandemic, intoxicants, and public spaces. The film was shot in a safe and socially distanced...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 8 Jul 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.