The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Swift"

Showing 1 - 20 of 51

Your search for posts with tags containing Swift found 51 posts

Sir Tremendous Longinus and the Ridiculum

It just sounds so rude! Sir Tremendous Longinus: somehow priapic and vaginal at the same time. It is also by far the funniest thing about the Pope, Arbuthnot, and Gay’s play Three Hours After Marriage in which Sir Trem appears as ‘the greatest critick...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 21 Jul 2021

“I told Cushing as Ruggles told Tyler”

Yesterday I quoted a long anecdote that John Adams wrote out in 1789 about a discussion between two Massachusetts politicians seventeen years earlier. The specifics of Adams’s anecdotes aren’t always reliable when he was trying to make a point about...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jun 2021

“Rigor” or …?

In “Taylor Swift Is Bringing Us Back to Nature,” an opinion piece it the NY Times by the conservation scientist Jeff Opperman, reflects on the ways that Taylor Swift’s lyrics are foregrounding nature. In her two recent albums, we are...
From: Darin Hayton on 12 Mar 2021

New Humanist: Vesper Flights by Helen Macdonald

It is like a scene from a Hayao Miyazaki anime: a French WWI pilot, gliding down at twilight over enemy lines, finds himself surrounded by a flock of swifts seemingly motionless in the air. They are asleep on the wing, so close by he might reach out and...
From: Mathew Lyons on 30 Nov 2020

Legends of Paul Revere’s Departure from Boston

After the publication of “Paul Revere’s Ride” by Henry W. Longfellow in 1860, there was a lot more attention on the silversmith and his activity on 18-19 Apr 1775.Little stories that Paul Revere’s descendants had told within the...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Apr 2020

“The Town make choice of a proper Person to deliver an Oration”

Yesterday I described how Bostonians commemorated the first anniversary of the Boston Massacre in 1771, including Dr. Thomas Young delivering a political oration in the Manufactory.Six days later, on Monday, 11 March, Boston had its first town meeting...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Apr 2020

The Author review: Book Parts, edited by Dennis Duncan and Adam Smyth

In 1723 the London bookseller Thomas Graves published a 12-page pamphlet entitled The First of April. Written in praise of the author of a recent poem named Ridotto, or Downfal of Masquerades, it comprises a title page, a six-page dedicatory epistle,...
From: Mathew Lyons on 10 Feb 2020

Seven little known facts about Nell Gwyn: A Guest Post by Deborah Swift

1. Nell experimented with cross-dressing.  Between 1663 and 1667 she posed under the name “William Nell” and adopted a false beard. The disguise stood her in good stead when she needed to act as a man on the stage in March 1667,...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 16 Sep 2019

Book Review: ‘Entertaining Mr Pepys’ by Deborah Swift

Entertaining Mr Pepys is the third and final chapter of Deborah Swift’s trilogy on that most famous naval administrator/diarist of the late seventeenth century: Samuel Pepys. That said, it can be read as a standalone work – although I read...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 13 Sep 2019

Lines on the Birthday of Dr Swift

Jonathan Swift, by Charles Jervas, 1710. It is my birthday this week. People have already started celebrating. Because for the last 350 years I have been vexing the world, they still gather to talk about me, to talk about my books. They write books about...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 27 Nov 2017

Adam Smith: poverty and famine

Adam Smith, drawing by John Kay, 1790. My Besterman lecture was a highly critical assessment of Adam Smith’s views on famine. In The Wealth of Nations (1776) Smith claims that in a free market economy famines will never occur. The famines that...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 26 Jun 2017

Waterland — Graham Swift’s novel, the film by Stephen Gyllenhaal, Peter Prince

The fens, marshlands of East Anglia (from Waterland 1992) Children [are those] to whom, throughout history, stories have been told, chiefly but not always at bedtime, in order to quell restless thoughts; whose need of stories is matched only by the need...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 15 May 2017

The Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes across the Channel: Swift and Voltaire

Our book Ancients and Moderns in Europe: comparative perspectives is a collection of chapters covering three centuries of European quarrels over the legacy of classical Greece and Rome. With such a broad range of reference, it is inevitable that some...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 6 Jun 2016

'A Description of a City Shower' - Jonathan Swift

‘Careful observers may foretell the hour (By sure prognostics) when to dread a shower: While rain depends, the pensive cat gives o’er Her frolics, and pursues her tail no more.’ ‘A Description of a City Shower’ Jonathan...

ECF journal for Spring 2016 (28.3) features a new article on...

ECF journal for Spring 2016 (28.3) features a new article on Jonathan Swift, the master satirist: “Dark Humour and Moral Sense Theory: Or, How Swift Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Evil,” by Shane Herron, Furman University Read this article...

'A Night-Piece on Death' - Thomas Parnell

‘How deep yon azure dyes the sky, Where orbs of gold unnumbered lie, While through their ranks in silver pride The nether crescent seems to glide. The slumb’ring breeze forgets to breathe, The lake is smooth and clear beneath, Where...

“The union was established in a very ceremonial manner”

So what did the “Union” of North End and South End gangs on the fifth of November 1765 look like?As the Massachusetts Historical Society quoted in 2009, chronicler James Freeman described the day this way:the disorders which had been committed...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Nov 2015

The Danger of Pope Night in 1765

As I described earlier in the week, Boston’s civic leaders were very nervous that the fifth of November in 1765 would bring on a riot. As it usually did.On that date young British males traditionally observed Guy Fawkes Day or Pope Night by carting...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Nov 2015

Page 1 of 3123Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.