The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Tea"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Tea found 1342 posts

Red Roofs

Patriots Day 2019 was not a very enjoyable day. It was certainly not as dreadful as Patriots Day 2013, but still a frightful day. I woke up to thunder, looked out at the dreary rain, made the decision not to drive to Lexington so I could walk the Battle...
From: streets of salem on 18 Apr 2019

An essay on teaching retired adults in Oscher Institutes of Lifelong Learning

Typical catalogue Dear friends and readers, Anyone who reads this or my other blogs regularly know for the past five to six years now I have been working as a volunteer teacher in two local Oscher Institutes of Lifelong Learning. Each spring and fall,...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 14 Apr 2019

The Forces Align

This past weekend was happening; the streets of Salem were full of tourists and the historical events in which I was somewhat involved came off very well: the Salem Resistance Ball at Hamilton Hall and the “Salt Cod for Silver” symposium...
From: streets of salem on 8 Apr 2019

“If one old Yankee woman can take six grenadiers…”?

In his 1864 address West Cambridge on the Nineteenth of April, 1775, Samuel Abbott Smith told the story of six regulars surrendering to “Mother Batherick” after the supply wagon they were rolling west was attacked.Smith added: The squib went...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Mar 2019

Trollope’s Can You Forgive Her? (Palliser 1): a spring syllabus, OLLI at Mason

Plantagenet and Lady Glencora Palliser (Philip Latham and Susan Hampshire) on their honeymoon, hotel desk registration …. (1974 Pallisers, scripted Simon Raven) Burgo Fitzgerald buying some food and drink for a beggar girl, street walker (Hablôt...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 20 Mar 2019

Presidential Plateau: Putting French Gentility Center Stage

“Revolutionary Material Culture Series” This series examines the Age of Revolutions through its material markers, reminding us that materials themselves reflected and shaped political cultures around the revolutionary Atlantic and World. By...
From: Age of Revolutions on 18 Mar 2019

March 14

GUEST CURATOR: Luke DiCicco What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Essex Gazette (March 14, 1769). “CHOICE green Coffee … also blue and white China Cups and Saucers.” This advertisement features a...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Mar 2019

Guest Post: Caylin Carbonell, Does Size Really Matter? Searching for Early American Women in the Archives

Today’s guest post comes from Caylin Carbonell, PhD Candidate at the College of William and Mary. Her research interests include gender, family, and legal history in the colonial British Atlantic. Her dissertation looks at women’s everyday...
From: The Junto on 12 Mar 2019

The African-American History & Culture Museum: an experience that can alter the way you think about US history & culture

Tape Recorder used by Malcolm X. Wollensak Stereo-tape magnetic recorder, Model T-1515 Revolution is not a one-time event — Audre Lorde Friends and readers, People, if you’re in any doubt, go. It’s not only worth it, it is not as upsetting...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 10 Mar 2019

Black History is Salem History

I’m wrapping up February, a month in which educators have focused on African-American history since at least 1970, with a summary of some of the research in which I’ve been engaged and some links to some other initiatives and events in the...
From: streets of salem on 28 Feb 2019

Tales of faithful dogs from the Georgian era

There are many accounts of dogs seeking help for their owner following an accident. Here we’ve collected a few tales from contemporary newspapers. In the early evening of a mid-November day in 1767, a man named Gabriel Park was walking to his home...
From: All Things Georgian on 26 Feb 2019

Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian, 1773–1774

By the end of 1772, Catharine Macaulay had completed and published the first five volumes of her History of England from the Accession of... The post Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian, 1773–1774 appeared first on Journal...

A Lady’s “Tea” Party, 21st century Style

Dear Readers, Today I revisited a post I published in 2008 about tea and alcoholic beverages that led up to the regency era: Tea became fashionable after 1662 when King Charles II’s Portuguese bride, Catherine, brought a cask of it along with her...
From: Jane Austen's World on 18 Feb 2019

A spring syllabus for reading Anthony Trollope’s Can You Forgive Her? or Palliser 1

Plantagenet and Lady Glencora Palliser (Philip Latham and Susan Hampshire) on their honeymoon, hotel desk registration …. (1974 Pallisers, scripted Simon Raven) Burgo Fitzgerald buying some food and drink for a beggar girl, street walker (Hablôt...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 17 Feb 2019

Tea on the Terrace

Tea on the Terrace of the House of Commons was, by the beginning of the twentieth century, regarded as an integral part of the London ‘season’, the three month or so round of parties, races, dinners and balls (as well as rather more staid...
From: History of Parliament on 15 Feb 2019

Edwardian Tudors

I’m back teaching this semester after a productive sabbatical, although I’m a bit out of practice. Thankfully I’ve got my favorite Tudor-Stuart survey scheduled, a course that I’ve taught many, many times but always in a different...
From: streets of salem on 29 Jan 2019

The Power of “S”: Diversity and Inclusion in the Age of Revolutions Classroom

By Bryan A. Banks Those familiar with the historical discipline will no doubt be acquainted with the many “turns” the profession has gone through since the rise of social history in the 1960s and 70s. Old Marxist paradigms and various forms...
From: Age of Revolutions on 28 Jan 2019

Resolutions Shared by Two Towns 300 Miles Apart

The year was 1773. On May 10, Parliament had passed the Tea Act allowed the East India Company to sell tea directly to the... The post Resolutions Shared by Two Towns 300 Miles Apart appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.