The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Tea"

Showing 1 - 20 of 1546

Your search for posts with tags containing Tea found 1546 posts

Galatea 101: Performing John Lyly in the 21st Century

Galatea (c.1584) enjoyed some more research and development with actors in August 2021, as it heads towards a production in collaboration with Wildworks, when director Emma Frankland gathered theatremakers at the 101 Outdoor Creation Space (thanks to...
From: Before Shakespeare on 20 Sep 2021

Teaching the History of Race

Historians confront the complicated history of race and racism in the pre-modern, modern, and contemporary world. Yet, historians and social science teachers in the United States are under attack by conservative politicians and political activists....

Virtual Rome

My students in HIST 420 The Renaissance at Northern Illinois University recently discussed the intellectual movement of Humanism in the Renaissance, focusing especially on the Humanists’ fascination with antiquities and their nostalgia for ancient Rome....

Addressing Colonialism and Historic Slavery at the National Trust

Illustration by Michael Kennedy for Sam Knight’s article in The New Yorker (23 August 2021), p. 31 The National Trust released its Interim Report on the Connections between Colonialism and Properties Now in the Care of the National Trust, Including...
From: Enfilade on 25 Aug 2021

Galatea 101 #3

Bea Webster talks about the process of turning sixteenth-century English into British Sign Language and the creation of appropriate signs, the importance of a diverse rehearsal room, and what it’s like playing a character about to be sacrificed… Part...
From: Before Shakespeare on 19 Aug 2021

Galatea 101 #

Nadia Nadarajah and Brian Duffy tell us about their experiences working on the play Galatea, including translations into British Sign Language, exploring the character of the goddess Diana, and using physical communication and visual vernacular. The work...
From: Before Shakespeare on 19 Aug 2021

Galatea

This week and next, Galatea is back on its feet once more! Now heading towards a production in collaboration with Wildworks, director and theatremaker Emma Frankland has gathered theatremakers at the 101 Outdoor Creation Space (made possible thanks to...
From: Before Shakespeare on 18 Aug 2021

And now for something completely different

Now that the second book is safely out of my hands, I’ve been working for the last little while on some new things: perpetual motion machines (see this earlier post for a very preliminary version), Spanish ghosts in English-conquered Jamaica, scientific...
From: memorious on 27 Jul 2021

A Snapshot in Time: Clouet Portraits on Display at Azay-le-Rideau

Like any author, I love it when characters I have written about come into the public eye. Artist duo Jean and François Clouet, featured in my second novel, worked as portraitists at the courts of François I, Henri II, and Henri's sons. I posted previously...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 22 Jul 2021

The Nineteenth-Century Coffee Commodity Chain: Representation and Reality

In the first part of my PhD thesis, I explored how Douwe Egberts, one of the largest Dutch producers of coffee and tea, used images of factories and cultivation landscapes in their advertising campaigns between 1900 and 1950. By applying the semiotic...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 1 Jul 2021

Governance at James Madison’s Montpelier

James Madison’s estate Montpelier was a slave-labor plantation. In fact, Madison appears to have been comfortable with that. He didn’t wrestle with the morality of slaveholding like his friend Thomas Jefferson. He didn’t even acknowledge the contradictions...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Jun 2021

Villages out of Time and Place

So this is going to be one of those posts in which I ask a lot of questions and have no answers (I think; maybe I will get to some). I’m trying to work out my own thoughts about a particular place and what it means: writing is one way to do that, as...
From: streets of salem on 14 Jun 2021

Thinking about Feel-Good History

At the Panorama, the blog of the Society of Historians of the Early American Republic, Princeton professor Michael A. Blaakman just shared an essay titled “How Should History Make Us Feel?”While Blaakman’s remarks were prompted by David McCullough’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Jun 2021

Innovative High School Teaching in Renaissance Studies

The Renaissance Society of America (RSA) recently sponsored a competition for high school teaching in the field of Renaissance Studies. High school teachers across the United States submitted teaching projects and class plans on various topics in Renaissance...

“Frantic reactions to the teaching of history”

Back in February, Prof. Michael Leroy Oberg of the State University of New York at Geneseo wrote an op-ed essay for the Syracuse Republican addressing legislative pressures to limit what public school history teachers could teach. Oberg wrote: Frantic...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Jun 2021

May 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Complete Assortment of GOODS (TEA excepted).” John Edwards and Company moved quickly to place an advertisement for new merchandise in the South-Carolina Gazette.  According...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 May 2021

Diversity in Historical Re-enactments

Colonial Williamsburg, one of the most important sites for historical re-enactment in the United States, is increasingly stressing diversity issues in its historical interpretations of colonial American society. The community of Williamsburg, Virginia,...

The Right Way to Study the Founders

A few days ago Lindsay Chervinsky, author of The Cabinet, shared some thoughts on continuing to include the most famous Founders in the teaching of U.S. history even as we include more people in our study of the past: We can and should teach the Founding...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 May 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.