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Search Results for "Technology in the Classroom"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Technology in the Classroom found 28 posts

Teaching ‘Macbeth’ in the Digital Age

For the next few weeks, @folgerlibrary is teaming up with @NCTE and Ben Herold, @BenjaminBHerold reporter for Education Week, to learn from all of you your best thinking on teaching Macbeth. Ben is working on an article that will appear in Ed Week...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 5 Oct 2016

Five Strategies for Teaching Shakespeare to Students with Learning Differences

Act 1 Scene 2 from “Twelfth Night”. (Photo: Folger Education)I work at a college preparatory school for students with language based learning differences, and I teach a yearlong course on the works of Shakespeare. My students’ learning...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 7 Sep 2016

Free, Searchable, Downloadable Shakespeare for All!

Will you join us in providing every student and teacher with free access to meticulously edited texts of Shakespeare’s works? Keep reading. Two blocks from the gleaming US Capitol and across the street from the Library of Congress sits the Folger...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 31 Aug 2016

“A thousand twangling instruments”: Using media production to teach Shakespeare

I work at a school for students with learning differences, so I’m always looking for ways to create multiple points of access for every text my students study.  One of my favorite ways of doing that is through multimedia creation.  In...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 22 Mar 2016

4 Reasons to Use the Web in a Shakespeare Unit

(Image: Folger Shakespeare Library)Don’t get us wrong. We love—like, love—paper. We’re a rare book library, after all. We’re crazy for the codex! At the same time, we’re excited about all that the digital realm is doing...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 9 Feb 2016

Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part Four

By Folger Education Today we bring you an idea for a final project in a Romeo and Juliet unit. Watch how Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum and English teacher David Fulco blends performance, language study, and digital research in this student-centered...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 7 Apr 2015

Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part Three

By Folger Education   What does sound editing software have to do with Shakespeare? Let’s find out in the third installment of our teacher-created videos on teaching Romeo and Juliet. Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum Matt Seymour shares...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 2 Apr 2015

Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part Two

By Folger Education   Here’s another great teaching video on Act 1 of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, this time from Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum and English teacher Alli Gubanich.   Here’s Alli’s message for you as you watch...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 31 Mar 2015

4 Free and Fabulous Folger Resources You Shouldn’t Miss

By Corinne Viglietta It’s Tech Tuesday, everyone! Looking for a digital image of Paul Robeson’s promptbook for Othello?  Ever wonder what a Pinterest board for The Tempest would look like? Do you want to trace the uses of the word “fair” across...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 10 Feb 2015

What I Learned from the High School Fellowship: A Teacher’s Notes

By Corinne Viglietta Our competitive antedaters use new web tools to find the true origins of words attributed to Shakespeare. We just wrapped up our (exhilarating!) 2014 High School Fellowship, dubbed affectionately by its 16 participants as “Varsity...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 16 Dec 2014

Tech Tips: Creating Shakespeare Radio Plays

#102754951 / gettyimages.com By Dana Huff Act IV, Scene 1 of Macbeth is great fun: the three witches are brewing a “hell-broth” which they will use to conjure the apparitions that talk to Macbeth. The scene contains some of the most memorable lines...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 4 Nov 2014

Tech Tips: To Build Close Reading Skills, Teach Annotation

#171586213 / gettyimages.com By Dana Huff In order to help students develop close reading skills, we teach them how to annotate. Annotation has traditionally been thought of as a pencil-and-paper activity, but e-readers, such as Kindle and iBooks, have...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 26 Aug 2014

Dana Huff: A Model for Integrating Technology in the Classroom

#171252433 / gettyimages.com With all the technology tools out there, how can you sort out which ones are the most useful for your classroom? Dana Huff, the Humanities/Technology specialist for the 2014 Teaching Shakespeare Institute at the Folger, recently...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 15 Jul 2014

R&J Flash Mobs Across North America

In a recent post, I requested that schools, theaters, or anyone else should stage a Flash Mob for the Balcony Scene from R&J. Well the deadline has passed, and we’ve had 28 fabulous submissions. They come from Ponahou School in Hawaii, from...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 1 May 2014

Pathways into Shakespeare: How to deal with internal resistance to new ideas for teaching the Bard

Guest post by Josh Cabat “Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.” While the average ELA Chair or Director has little to fear in terms of civil unrest in the Northlands, we have all, as did Henry IV, struggled with internal resistance to...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 10 Apr 2014

Teacher Tuesday: Shakespeare and Flipped Classrooms

Flipped classrooms are getting a lot of buzz right now. Can the model be used to successfully teach Shakespeare? In a flipped classroom, instruction is offered during homework time (often in the form of short videos online), and teachers focus more on...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 17 Dec 2013

Teacher Tuesday: Teaching with Tech

The amount of new technology springing up around us can be dizzying, especially when our students are picking it up so quickly. Much of their daily life is conducted online – so how can our classrooms extend into that area of their life? In these...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 29 Oct 2013

Shakespeare for Everyone: Working with Students with Severe Disabilities

~by Christopher Shamburg, New Jersey City University Shakespeare can be a powerful tool for the cognitive, emotional, social, and linguistic development of all kids. I saw this phenomenon when working with the students of A. Harry Moore School in Jersey...
From: Folger SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY on 11 Jul 2013

Canst Thou Bring Me to the Party?

It’s a very busy week in Folger Education! We’re excited to have so much to offer for Shakespeare’s Birthday, this year, and are excited to be a part of PBS LearningMedia’s celebrations as well! This month,PBS LearningMedia is...
From: Folger SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY on 16 Apr 2013

“Here will we sit and let the sounds of music creep in our ears…”

How do you connect Shakespeare with culture and history? Those of us teaching Shakespeare to young people in the classroom are tasked with not only making learning interesting but also relevant. In observance of Black History Month, we want to pay tribute...
From: Folger SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY on 21 Feb 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.