The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "The Single Life"

Your search for posts with tags containing The Single Life found 11 posts

Dating disasters of the Regency era

Confession: First Dates is my televisual jam. (For the uninitiated, in brief: strangers are set up on dates at a London restaurant by a suave Frenchman called Fred {above}, said date is filmed, & they are then subjected to having their dating style...
From: The History of Love on 31 Jan 2018

Miss Wish-Husband & The Old Maid’s Advice, 1748

Today it occurred to me that if I were living in the eighteenth century I would be quite firmly set in the realm of confirmed spinster. Setting any associated nervous breakdown aside for the moment, I feel compelled to console myself by sharing this...
From: The History of Love on 4 Apr 2015

Eight reasons why a dog is the broken-hearted woman’s best friend

Any readers who also follow me on twitter will have guessed by now that I am also quite fond of the history of animals, and most especially that of dogs. They have been our loyal and loving companions for thousands of years, and in eighteenth-century...
From: The History of Love on 4 Feb 2015

A New Sort of Holyday for Husbands, or a warning to troublesome wives, 1733

Here is a particularly heartwarming (*cough*) report of one man’s enthusiastic embrace of widowhood in London in 1733. Yes folks, the ‘new holyday for husbands’ is to be enjoyed when your troublesome wife drops dead. Charming. (Although...
From: The History of Love on 3 Jul 2014

Old Maids & Old Bachelors: An Assembly of Undateables, 1743

These two companion prints, published in 1743, illustrate the wares on offer for those who have found it difficult to find a match, whether owing to their age, vulgar behaviour, illness – or simply the unfortunate arrangement of their facial features. In...
From: The History of Love on 20 Feb 2014

Some familiar c18th New Year’s Resolutions

Struggling to come up with some New Year’s Resolutions for 2014? Here is some eighteenth-century inspiration (and some of them seem terribly familiar…) 1. To sort out your love life (whatever form that may take) Resolv’d to be Married!!...
From: The History of Love on 31 Dec 2013

Learning to love yourself… it is the greatest love of all (1775)

And I think this bloke has got it covered. - Print probably from The Matrimonial Magazine, c.1775. Courtesy of the Lewis Walpole Library
From: The History of Love on 11 Dec 2013

If Georgian England’s single ladies were in charge… (1800)

Knowing how consumed most single ladies were with the mission of securing a husband, just imagine what harassment England’s bachelors might have been subjected to if the women were given charge of romantic proceedings. The Leap Year tradition of...
From: The History of Love on 1 Dec 2013

A peep inside a bachelor pad, 1752

I once had the pleasure of living in a house with 5 boys. It was an eye-opening, stomach-turning sort of experience.* The bachelor pad – rarely lauded as a palace of hygiene and grace – has horrified genteel ladies (such as myself, *cough*) for...
From: The History of Love on 2 Oct 2013

The Ruined Girl, 1786

THE RUINED GIRL. ‘Oh! fatal Day when to my Virtues wrong, I fondly listen’d to his flattering Tongue, But oh! more fatal Moment when he gain’d, That vile Consent which all my Glory staind.’ In this print of 1786, a young woman...
From: The History of Love on 17 Sep 2013

Nottingham: overrun with giggling, gambling spinsters?

It is almost three years now since I bid a fond farewell to Nottinghamshire, in favour of what most would deem the more sophisticated climes of Oxford. [In defence of this statement I remind you that the county is possibly named after a Saxon leader...
From: The History of Love on 8 Sep 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.