The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Theater"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Theater found 233 posts

“See the Court cheat the injurd people With a Shew of Justice”

It should be no surprise that Bostonians continued to wrangle over the Boston Massacre trials even after they ended with two manslaughter convictions and eleven acquittals. One response was recounted by Thomas Hutchinson in the last volume of his history...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Dec 2020

Historic Holiday Presentations

Lots of local historical organizations are offering special online events to make staying healthy at home this season more interesting. Here’s a selection that caught my eye.Sunday, 6 December, 5:00 P.M.Virtual Traditions of the SeasonPaul Revere...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Dec 2020

“Dr. Lincoln and his Lady”

Earlier this month I discussed how John Adams, the Rev. Anthony Wibird, and Dr. Bela Lincoln of Hingham competed for the attention of Hannah Quincy in north Braintree.Sometime in the spring of 1759 John wrote that he almost proposed to Hannah, only to...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Oct 2020

Copley’s Theatrical Nun at the Huntington

The Huntington Library in California just announced that it had acquired this “newly discovered painting by John Singleton Copley (1738–1815) depicting celebrated 18th-century British actress Mary Robinson.”According to the institution:Mrs....
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Oct 2020

Online Discussions of Revolutionary Theater and Civil War Statuary

Here are a couple of online historical events coming up this week.The Massachusetts Historical Society hosts the next session of the Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar on Tuesday, 6 October. Prof. Heather S. Nathans of Tufts University has shared...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Oct 2020

“A TRAGEDY (Not acted here these seventy-eight years)”

On 1 Feb 1770, a curious notice appeared in the Boston Chronicle, the twice-weekly newspaper published by Scottish immigrants John Mein and John Fleeming.It read:Intended speedily to be actedBy a Company of young Tragedians,A TRAGEDY(Not acted here these...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Apr 2020

Michael Angelo Warwell, Bit Player in the Boston Massacre

In 1741, in the English market town of Totnes, a baby was baptized with the name Michael Angelo Warwell. The reason for such a baroque name was that the boy’s parents, John and Maria Warwell, were artists. According to the Rev. Samuel Reynolds,...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Mar 2020

The First and Ongoing Pauline Maier Seminar Series

The Boston Area Early American History Seminar has changed its name to the Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, honoring the late M.I.T. professor who was an enthusiast for these discussion and many other ways of delving into the national past.The...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Sep 2019

Miss Lloyd, or the Third Mrs. Wilson?

Yesterday I noted the London Stage Database’s reference to an actress called “Mrs. Lloyd” (formerly “Mrs. C——we”), who had performed in Boston’s “military theatre” a few years before 1779.Another...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Jul 2019

Taking in the London Stage Database

The London Stage Database is an online resource that went live this summer. The website explains its origins:The London Stage Database is the latest in a long line of projects that aim to capture and present the rich array of information available on...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Jul 2019

The fair in an uproar

With a large woodcut below the title and preceding the letterpress text: Madamoiselle Javellot is shown on stage flanked on either side by chandeliers wtih her performing dogs in costumes in front and a musician in the background, left, behind the curtain....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 21 Jun 2019

The stage medley

“Satire on the popularity of the Beggar’s Opera in the form of a medley print.” Title: The stage medley [graphic] : representing the polite tast [sic] of the Town & the matchless merits of Poet G- Polly Peachum and Captn. Macheath....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 8 May 2019

August Wilson’s American Century Cycle

August Wilson writing Friends and readers, Over the course of the last nine to ten weeks I’ve read 8 out of the 10 plays August Wilson wrote in an endeavor to realize through poetic and realistic enough drama on the stage the African-American experience...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 5 May 2019

The Mysterious Mother: Staged Reading and Mini-Conference Program

As part of Walpolooza, a mini-conference was held on May 3, 2018 after the staged reading of The Mysterious Mother.  The full program for the staged reading and the mini-conference can be read below (hover over bottom portion of page to get arrows...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 29 Apr 2019

The Director’s Reflection on Staging The Mysterious Mother

When Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints at the Lewis Walpole Library asked me if I would be willing to stage Horace Walpole’s 1768 The Mysterious Mother as part of the year’s “Walpolooza” events, I hesitated at first. Like Walpole...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 29 Apr 2019

Digital Scenery for The Mysterious Mother

The digital scenery for the staged reading of The Mysterious Mother was designed by Alice Trent and projected onto the concrete walls of auditorium in the Yale Center for British Art. https://www.18thcenturycommon.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/MM-Clip-Wide.mp4...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 29 Apr 2019

The Mysterious Mother , A Staged Reading

The mini-conference on The Mysteroius Mother presented by The Lewis Walpole Library and the Yale Center for British Art began with a staged reading on May 2, 2018.  Watch the complete staged reading here: The post <em> The Mysterious Mother...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 26 Apr 2019

Abridging Walpole’s The Mysterious Mother

Having been the one who abridged Walpole’s five-act semi-Shakespearian play down to a c.45-50 minute running time for this staged reading, I was amazed at the underlying economy of Walpole’s dramatic writing. Those familiar with...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 22 Apr 2019

Playing Walpole’s Adeliza

Chelsea Phillips playing Adeliza and Georgina Lock playing the Countess of Narbonne in Walpole’s play The Mysterious Mother. May 2, 2018. Being involved in a workshop staging of Walpole’s The Mysterious Mother was both a joy and...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 22 Apr 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.