The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Thomas Cushing"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Thomas Cushing found 22 posts

“I wish for a happy Harmony in the Legislature”

As the Boston Whigs held a simulation of Election Day ceremonies on 30 May 1770, the real thing was going on across the river in Cambridge.At nine o’clock the recently elected members of the Massachusetts General Court met in the chapel of Harvard...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 May 2020

Non-Importation in the New Year

At the end of 1769, the Boston merchants’ non-importation agreement ran out. But the Townshend duties were still in effect, so the Whigs insisted on maintaining that boycott into the new year. That required leaning on people who wanted to resume...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jan 2020

John Adams and “the important Secret”

John Adams’s diary offers a case study of how well the Massachusetts Whigs kept the secrets that Benjamin Franklin asked Thomas Cushing to keep. Adams received the “Collection of Seventeen Letters” on 22 March 1773. Since he was no longer...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Apr 2019

“It was Impossible to prevent the Letters being made public”

On 14 June 1773, Massachusetts speaker of the house Thomas Cushing wrote a letter to Benjamin Franklin in London. He had a thorny topic to address. Franklin had sent Cushing a bundle of letters written by royal officials and supporters in New England...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Apr 2019

“A person in the street had put into his hands a number of papers”?

In his 9 June 1773 response to the Massachusetts house about his letters, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson insisted he hadn’t written anything secret or oppressive. He then went on:I am at a Loss for what Purpose you desire the Copies of my Letters the Originals...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Apr 2019

“The Tendency and Design of the Letters”

On 2 June 1773, the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court listened to a reading of the bundle of letters that Benjamin Franklin had sent from London. The record doesn’t show whether Samuel Adams did the reading as the assembly’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Mar 2019

“Letters of an extraordinary Nature”

When the Massachusetts General Court convened in Boston’s Town House in May 1773, one of the first substantial pieces of business the house did was to respond to a letter from the House of Burgesses in Virginia suggesting a committee to trade information...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Mar 2019

“No Copies of the whole or any Part to be taken”

On 24 Mar 1773, as described yesterday, Thomas Cushing promised Benjamin Franklin that he and other Massachusetts Whig legislators wouldn’t make any copies of the letters Franklin had sent from London with his approval.Franklin had also specified...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Mar 2019

“I have engag’d that it shall not be printed”

In the spring of 1773, the Boston Whigs had an incendiary document that they wanted to share with the public. But the person who supplied that document had asked them not to make copies or circulate it widely. The document was a collection of letters...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Mar 2019

Opening Day for the Massachusetts Convention of 1768

On Thursday, 22 Sept 1768, 250 years ago today, the Massachusetts Convention met for the first time in Faneuil Hall. Participants were dubbed to be “committees” from their respective towns.Gov. Francis Bernard sent a strongly worded message...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Sep 2018

“A pretence for arming the Town”

We pick up the proceedings of Boston’s town meeting on 13 Sept 1768 after the voters present unanimously approved a call for a Convention of representatives from all of Massachusetts’s towns.According to Gov. Francis Bernard’s report...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Sep 2018

“Such a prudent and proper Use of this Letter”

On 29 Feb 1768, as I described yesterday, the passengers on the Abigail finally made it to solid ground in Boston after a terrible fourteen-week voyage from London.Among those passengers was a new Customs officer named Thomas Irving, who carried a letter...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Jun 2018

Voting Against and For the Circular Letter

It’s hard to know exactly what happened when James Otis, Jr., Samuel Adams, and the rest of their committee presented the Massachusetts General Court with the first draft of a circular letter to other colonial assemblies on 21 Jan 1768. Legislative...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jun 2018

Behind Massachusetts’s Circular Letter

The story of the Massachusetts Circular Letter of 1768 starts with the previous year’s session of the Massachusetts General Court.That provincial legislature was supposed to reconvene after its spring session on 2 Sept 1767. But that summer Parliament...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jun 2018

Going through the Motions on Election Day

On 25 May 1768, 250 years ago today, Election Day finally arrived in Boston. At 9:00 A.M. the towns’ representatives to the Massachusetts General Court gathered in the Town House and took their oaths of office. They unanimously reelected Thomas...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 May 2018

“Sent you one of phillis whetleys books”

Yesterday I quoted from a letter that Deborah Cushing sent her husband Thomas in September 1774 when he was serving in the First Continental Congress.When that letter is cited today, it’s usually because Cushing mentioned the poet Phillis Wheatley....
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Apr 2017

“The peopel hear gott 2 of mr Paddocks cannon one night”

Here’s another report of the removal of cannon from Charlestown and Boston in September 1774 which I came across only last week. It’s a letter from Deborah Cushing to her husband Thomas Cushing (shown here), speaker of the Massachusetts House....
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Apr 2017

A Split in the Merchants’ Club in 1771

On Tuesday, 13 Aug 1771, John Adams went into Boston for a weekly meeting of one of his gentlemen’s clubs and discovered that most of the club wasn’t there. He wrote in his diary:Spent the Evening at [Hannah] Cordis’s, the British Coffee...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Aug 2016

Poking through the Joseph Hawley Papers

Harvard University isn’t the only institution digitizing Revolutionary-era documents, of course.The New York Public Library ended up with a bunch of significant papers from Massachusetts, including Samuel Adams’s papers and the correspondence...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Nov 2015

Gov. Bernard’s Instructions to the General Court

As soon as the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court reported that it had a quorum on 25 Sept 1765, Gov. Francis Bernard summoned that body up to the Council Chamber in the Town House (now the Old State House) for a serious talk.Since Bernard...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Sep 2015

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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This is the basic structure:

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.