The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Thomas and John Fleet"

Your search for posts with tags containing Thomas and John Fleet found 13 posts

“Soon after the fire broke out, he caused his wind to blow”

Given Boston’s religious heritage, the Great Fire of 1760 naturally caused people to ask what God meant by it. On 23 March, the Sunday after the fire, the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew preached about the calamity at the West Meetinghouse. That sermon said...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Feb 2019

Sufferers from the Great Boston Fire of 176

The scope of the Boston fire of 20 Mar 1760 really comes out in the list of victims that the newspapers published in the following week. The list was actually a guess, based on November 1759 property assessment records. The printers acknowledged that...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jan 2019

“Then was beheld a perfect torrent of fire”

The 24 Mar 1760 Boston Evening-Post, the first issue after the great fire that started in the Brazen Head, reprinted the Boston News-Letter’s account of how the flames spread. The Fleet brothers then tried to communicate the emotional experience...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jan 2019

January 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (January 5, 1769).“Most of these Papers will, probably, be irrevocably lost in a few Years, unless they be preserved by Printing.”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Jan 2019

“Pre-Revolutionary Newspaper Wars” in Jamaica Plain, 4 Dec.

On Tuesday, 4 December, I’ll speak at the Loring-Greenough House in Jamaica Plain on the topic of “Boston’s Pre-Revolutionary Newspaper Wars (and What They May Tell Us About Today’s News Media).”This is part of the site’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Nov 2018

Boston’s Well-Regulated Militia

From the 26 Sept 1768 Boston Evening-Post.Whereas a Person belonging to the Militia in this Town did, on Thursday last [i.e., 22 September], about 2 o’Clock P.M. designedly and maliciously, as appeared to several By-standers, discharge his Musket...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Oct 2018

“The Liberty Song” with a “Set of Notes”

Last month I wrote a few postings about “The Liberty Song” appearing in 1768 and quickly becoming popular among American Whigs.I also wrote a series about how John Mein and John Fleeming’s Boston Chronicle, launched in late 1767, was...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Feb 2018

“He shall not be tho’t disagreeable by any Lady”

In Customs and Fashions in Old New England (1894), Alice Morse Earle wrote that this advertisement appeared in the Boston Evening-Post on 23 Feb 1759:To the LADIES. ANY young Lady, between the Age of Eighteen and Twenty-three of a middling Stature; brown...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Jan 2016

The Mysterious Constitutional Courant

Yesterday’s posting introduced Lawrence Sweeny, a New York newspaper carrier. He played a small but significant role in promoting resistance to the Stamp Act in 1765.In September of that year, after protests against the Stamp Act had erupted in...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Jan 2016

The Art of Peter Fleet

Finally I’m getting back to the family of enslaved printers in pre-Revolutionary Boston, Peter Fleet and his sons Pompey and Caesar.In his history of printing, Isaiah Thomas mentioned the last two by name, so when scholars spotted the initials “P.F”...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Apr 2014

The Other Fleet Brothers: “brought up to work at press and case”

Last week I spoke to the Freedom Trail Foundation guides as they were preparing for a new season leading people around Boston.I talked about newspapers and the people who printed them—a group that included not only white men but women (Margaret Draper),...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Apr 2014

The Legend of the Long Room Club

Yesterday I quoted Samuel A. Drake’s 1873 description of the “Long Room Club” of pre-Revolutionary Boston and asked what was missing. My answer is that Drake didn’t mention any source(s) for his information. He stated that a hundred years earlier...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Nov 2013

“Boston’s Newspaper Wars” at the B.P.L., 6 Nov.

Next week on Wednesday, 6 November, I’ll speak in the Boston Public Library’s Local and Family History Series on “Boston’s Pre-Revolutionary Newspaper Wars.”During that period, Bostonians had several newspapers to choose from:...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Oct 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.