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Search Results for "Tim"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Tim found 624 posts

Home is Where Everything Is

I can’t get through the 2020 Year of Blogging on #SalemSuffrageSaturdays, historic houses, and the occasional book-inspired post alone: the most important place for everyone this year was the home, and so I need to show you more of mine to be true...
From: streets of salem on 20 Oct 2020

McBurney on “George Washington’s Nemesis,” 8 Oct.

On Thursday, 8 October, the Fraunces Tavern Museum in New York will share a talk by Christian McBurney on “George Washington’s Nemesis: The Outrageous Treason and Unfair Court-Martial of General Charles Lee.”The event description says:While...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Oct 2020

On Tour: A New Angle on HMS Victory

Time to resume (fairly) regular blogging! The recent hiatus has been due partly to various commitments, but also to a sense that I had nothing new to blog about. Recently, though, I’ve done a little travelling, the first in six months, and also...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 28 Sep 2020

New Research on Vikings

DNA studies are revealing new information on complicated ethnic backgrounds of Viking warriors and traders in medieval Europe. A research team led by a professor at the University of Copenhagen has analyzed the genomes of 443 bodies buried in Viking...

September 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Paper will then be one of the cheapest of its Size, printed in America.” Newspaper printers collected two revenue streams: subscriptions and advertising. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Sep 2020

Contributor Close-Up: Timothy Symington

What inspired you to start researching and writing about the Revolution? I have always had a desire to learn about history.  I was the... The post Contributor Close-Up: Timothy Symington appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

People in Motion Podcasts on the History of Pandemics

The People in Motion: Entangled Histories of Displacement across the Mediterranean (PIMo) network of historians is providing a series of podcasts on the history of pandemics to provide a deeper context for understanding on the current Covid-19 pandemic....

18th Century Boat Replica From Russia Stops in Sault Ste. Marie

https://www.9and10news.com/2020/08/24/18th-century-boat-replica-from-russia-stops-in-sault-ste-marie/
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 25 Aug 2020

“Two floating batteries came up Mystic River”

Back in June, we left the town of Malden worrying in mid-1775 about being attacked by British forces out of Charlestown, across the Mystic River.The town had ended up with two cannon from Newburyport. Locals built earthworks near the landing of the Penny...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Aug 2020

“Safe no where but in his house”

On the evening of Tuesday, 28 Feb 1775, Henry Barnes opened the door of his large house in Marlborough (shown above, even larger after nineteenth-century expansion). Two strangers from England stepped inside. They apologized to Barnes “for taking...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jul 2020

“As we intended to go to Mr. Barns’s”

On Sunday, 26 Feb 1775, Capt. William Brown, Ens. Henry DeBerniere, and their bodyservant were in Worcester. They were all soldiers in the British army, but undercover in civilian dress. Because New England colonies had laws against traveling from town...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Jul 2020

July 24

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “An Exhibition of modern Books, by AUCTION.” Robert Bell, one of the most influential booksellers and auctioneers in eighteenth-century America, toured New England in...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Jul 2020

Reticello Glass

Reticello by Aaron Tate (detail),Photo by David Lindes.In fine art of the early twentieth century, ‘cubist’ painters and sculptors caused a sensation by pioneering a style that was fluid and emotional yet rigorously geometric....
From: Conciatore on 24 Jul 2020

Filigrana Glass

Mezza Filigrana footed vase, circa 1950s,by Dino Martens (for Aureliano Toso).Filigrana is a classical glassmaking technique developed in the sixteenth century on the Venetian island of Murano. In the broadest sense, a piece of filigrana --...
From: Conciatore on 22 Jul 2020

An American Bolingbroke: John Taylor of Caroline’s Republican Opposition, 1792–1794, Part 2 of

Henry St. John, Viscount Bolingbroke, in the first half of the eighteenth century, and John Taylor of Caroline in the 1790s, both feared that... The post An American Bolingbroke: John Taylor of Caroline’s Republican Opposition, 1792–1794,...

The Pudding Pinching Heifer Heisters

Taylor Aucoin The Deposition Dramas blog series highlights some of the rich human stories preserved in early modern court depositions, the primary source material for the Forms of Labour Project. Each post in the series follows a different court case,...
From: Forms of Labour on 9 Jul 2020

Introducing Loyalist Migrations

Tim Compeau Loyalist Migrations is a collaboration between Huron University College’s Community History Centre, the United Empire Loyalist Association of Canada (UELAC), and Liz Sutherland at the Map and Data Centre at Western University. This will...
From: Borealia on 8 Jun 2020

Seven Women of Salem: the Preservationists

I’ve been rather depressed about the state of historic preservation in Salem: after a strong commitment in response to full scale urban renewal in the 1960s and early 1970s we seem to be awash in a sea of vinyl siding and shed dormers. I’m...
From: streets of salem on 23 May 2020

John Quincy Adams and the Characters of Harvard

I promised more cattiness from John Quincy Adams as a college student.In his diary for the year 1787, Adams inserted several profiles of his classmates and other people he met at Harvard. Often he was complimentary, understanding of people’s weaknesses...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 May 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.