The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Titus"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Titus found 50 posts

October 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Essex Gazette (October 31, 1769). “RAN-away … a Negro Man named Titus.” Titus was determined to make his escape from Thomas Jaques, the man who enslaved him....
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Oct 2019

August 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Essex Gazette (August 1, 1769). “Said Negro is the same that ran away from me the first of June.” As white colonists fretted about their figurative enslavement by Parliament...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 1 Aug 2019

Seeing Ninagawa: Macbeth and Titus

  This week at the Shakespeare Institute was a particularly exciting one. A delegation of colleagues from Waseda University in Tokyo came to see us and speak about the late, great theatre director, Yukio Ninagawa. Their visit coincided with the Ninagawa...
From: Digital Shakespeares on 8 Oct 2017

CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 3: Metre and Repertory

by Romola Nuttall Disclaimer: this post will be a grossly incomplete summary of a tremendously rich and engaging panel “Metre and Repertory”, which was so full of fascinating facts and questions that I cannot do them justice here. Robert Stagg’s...
From: Before Shakespeare on 26 Aug 2017

Working on John Hall at The Shakespeare Centre.

By Oscar Lake Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes, 1633.   This following post was written by fifteen-year-old Oscar Lake, who was on a work experience placement with Dr Paul Edmondson, Head of Research. He was based in Library and Archives...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 3 Aug 2017

“Absconded”

My friend Louise North sent me a note in regard to the last post on Titus Kaphar’s painting of George Washington, specifically the title of the painting “Absconded.” She reported: “Finally got a chance to look the word (absconded)...
From: In the Words of Women on 13 May 2017

“Dismantling History” —Titus Kaphar

My friend and colleague Louise North recently commended to my attention an American artist named TITUS KAPHAR. Indeed, upon examination, I find his work fascinating as it frequently deals with history—myth and misremembered—often focusing...
From: In the Words of Women on 5 May 2017

Illustrating Shakespeare: A History of Roman Representations in Printed Texts

By Ella Hawkins, SBT Research Advocate Ella Hawkins is currently completing a Midlands3Cities-funded placement with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust as part of her PhD studies in design for Shakespeare. In the coming weeks, Ella will be publishing...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 7 Mar 2017

Shakespeare in Padua

A view of Padua Just recently we’ve been experiencing cold, grey, depressing weather in the UK and we must all be thinking longingly of long, warm days spent somewhere exotic. It’s just the time, of course, for planning a summer holiday and...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 27 Jan 2017

“An Intimation of the Bombardment of Boston”

Today is the anniversary of the militia uprising in 1774 that Richard Frothingham dubbed the “Powder Alarm” in his biography of Dr. Joseph Warren.On 2 Sept 1774 up to five thousand Massachusetts militiamen crowded into Cambridge, forcing every...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Sep 2016

Blessed Richard Langhorne

Blessed Richard Langhorne (c. 1624 – 14 July 1679) was a barrister executed as part of the Popish Plot. He was admitted to the Inner Temple in May 1647 and called to the bar in November 1654. He provided legal and financial advice for the Jesuits.His...

Exeunt with bodies: Titus Andronicus

The late afternoon sun washed the Italian cypresses and eucalyptus trees in gold. A light wind made a lazy melody in the chimes. From a neighboring yard somewhere over the rolling, low-desert hills, a horse occasionally neighed. Except for the dogs, twitching...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 29 Apr 2016

The rain it raineth every day

The 2007 flood Over the last few weeks the news has been dominated by the dreadful and repeated flooding in parts of northern England and Scotland as a series of storms have swept across the UK. Cities have been swamped and ancient bridges swept away....
From: The Shakespeare blog on 4 Jan 2016

The Popish Plot and The Howard Family

The Howard family boasts two martyrs: St. Philip Howard who died in the Tower of London during Queen Elizabeth I's reign (denied the opportunity to see his son before he died unless he denied his Catholicism and professed to be a Protestant!) and his...

Performing a “chopped” ‘Titus Andronicus’ on the New Fortune Theatre Stage

By Dr Steve Chinna (The University of Western Australia) In what follows I address a student production of a condensed version of William Shakespeare’s visceral revenge tragedy Titus Andronicus on the New Fortune Theatre stage at The University...
From: Histories of Emotion on 17 Dec 2015

The First Popish Plot Victim

Blessed Edward Coleman was the first victim of the Popish Plot (except for truth and justice):A controversialist, politician, and secretary of the Duchess of York, date of birth unknown; executed at Tyburn, 3 December, 1678. He was the...

Five Jesuit Victims of the Popish Plot

The Jesuits in Britain website gives some background to the Popish Plot, specifically how intra-Catholic conflict contributed to the anti-Jesuit, anti-Catholic conspiracy dreamed up by Titus Oates:There were two separate forces behind the Popish Plot...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.