The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Tobacco"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Tobacco found 50 posts

CFP: Intoxicating Spaces: Global and Comparative Perspectives

An international conference organised and funded by the HERA research project Intoxicating Spaces: The Impact of New Intoxicants in Europe, 1600–1850, a collaboration between the University of Sheffield, the University of Oldenburg, the University...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 28 Aug 2020

August 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “He hopes this will be an additional recommendation to every sincere lover of AMERICA.” In the summer of 1770, Dennis McReady, a tobacconist on Horse and Cart Street...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Aug 2020

Intoxicating Spaces in the Time of Plague

In this brief vlog I discuss how our project has responded to the challenges posed by COVID-19 and lockdown, and reflect on the historical relationship between pandemic, intoxicants, and public spaces. The film was shot in a safe and socially distanced...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 8 Jul 2020

‘It Is Forbidden’: Tobacco Bans and Public Space in Eighteenth-Century Stockholm

At 9pm on 24 November 1793, two policemen called Dickman and Bergström arrested an unknown man on the Högbergsgatan for smoking tobacco and being drunk. Called to the police chamber in Stockholm the following day, the man was fined five riksdaler,...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 3 Jul 2020

Revisiting Katherine Allen’s Tobacco Smoke Enemas in Eighteenth-Century Domestic Medicine

Editor’s note: Today, we revisit a post from 2013 on the myriad and curious uses of tobacco in early modern England.  European imperialism turned the New World domesticate used primarily in ritual into a global commodity of leisure and health. ...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Jun 2020

New Intoxicants and Epidemics: Sugar and Tobacco in Hamburg’s Plague Medicine

In these trying times interest in past pestilences is booming, in particular in plague (and the Spanish flu), not least because there appear to be so many parallels between these diseases and COVID-19: home quarantine, face masks, and the Johns Hopkins...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 19 May 2020

Plague Time: Intoxicating Spaces and Pestilence in Seventeenth-Century London

One of the most challenging aspects of the lockdown and social distancing measures necessitated by COVID–19 are the restrictions placed on the intoxicating spaces of everyday life. The inability to visit coffee shops, pubs, restaurants and tea bars...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 22 Apr 2020

April 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “NEW Bourdeaux RAPPEE.” In an effort to launch a new product Henry Margue inserted an advertisement in the supplement that accompanied the April 17, 1770, edition of...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Apr 2020

Smoke Signals: Tobacco, Spirits, and Disaster in Late Seventeenth-Century Stockholm

One evening in 1695, the retired non-commissioned officer Lars Ekroth sat down in his home in Stockholm to smoke a pipe. While he was smoking, he received a vision he was sure came from the Holy Spirit. What was revealed to him was that the whole city,...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 15 Apr 2020

April 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “He purposes to pack it in Country made Pots.” Richard Thompson, “the Manufacturer of TOBACCO and SNUFF at Blackensburg,” placed an advertisement for his...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Apr 2020

Intoxicating Pharmacies? Apothecary Shops and New Intoxicants in Amsterdam, 1600–185

Thinking about intoxicating spaces, apothecary shops are probably not what first springs to mind. Yet, these places are very relevant in discussing the assimilation of new intoxicants into European diets. It may seem strange to us today, but they virtually...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 6 Mar 2020

A Matter of Measure: Tobacco in Seventeenth-Century German Satire

A German broadside published in 1658. Eight vignette etchings and a poem recount the story of tobacco’s arrival in Europe, and its ‘praiseworthy use by some German heroes/as well as the same’s real power and effect’. In the first...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 28 Feb 2020

8 Intoxicating Objects from Nordiska Museet

A key part of the Intoxicating Spaces project is our work with schools in the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Back in October, a group of 30 pupils from our Stockholm partner school Nacka Gymnasium joined our Swedish research team at Nordiska...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 29 Jan 2020

Addictive Cinema: 17 Intoxicating Films for the Holiday Season

One of the central and most rewarding aspects of the Intoxicating Spaces project is our work with sixth formers from schools in Utrecht, Oldenburg, Sheffield, and Stockholm. We’re all film-lovers, so Stephen suggested we assemble for our participating...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 16 Dec 2019

Smoke on the Water: Tobacco, Pirates, and Seafaring in the Early Modern World

In the 1990s, maritime archaeologists started to excavate the remains of a shipwreck in Beaufort Inlet on the North Carolina coast, excavations that continue (you can follow their progress on this website). It’s now generally accepted that the ship...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 9 Dec 2019

1619 Letter on Tobacco not Slaves from John Pory, Secretary of Virginia

The London Company was an English joint-stock company established in 1606 by royal charter by King James I with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America.Letter on Tobacco not Slaves from John Pory, Secretary of Virginia (1619)John...
From: 17th-century American Women on 29 Aug 2019

August 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (August 21, 1769). “These are Manufactures America can have within herself.” When George Traile advertised his “Manufactory...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Aug 2019

A New Tavern Opened in Brunswick Town

Archeologists from East Carolina University announced that they are exploring the site of an eighteenth-century tavern in Brunswick Town, North Carolina, once capital of that colony. The building was located by a student using ground-penetrating radar....
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jul 2019

April 7

GUEST CURATOR: Bryant Halpin What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (April 7, 1769).“TOBACCO PIPES.” In this advertisement John Allman and Company sold tobacco pipes. Also in...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Apr 2019

Tales from the Archives: Tobacco Smoke Enemas in Eighteenth-Century Domestic Medicine

In September 2018, The Recipes Project will be six years old. We’ve had a whole lotta blogging over the years. Today, I’m pleased to present our 675th post — a revisit of our most popular posts: Katherine Allen’s reflections on…...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Jun 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.