The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Townshend Act"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Townshend Act found 42 posts

Preparing for the Political Season to Reopen

Back in May 1768, the Massachusetts General Court added seven Whig House members involved in the Circular Letter dispute to the Council, which functioned as the legislature’s upper house and an advisory board for the governor. Gov. Francis Bernard...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 May 2020

May 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “All American Manufactures.” Thomas Shute’s advertisement occupied a privileged place in the May 4, 1770, edition of the South-Carolina Gazette.  It appeared...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 May 2020

An Economist’s Solution to the War: Adam Smith and the Rebelling Colonies

Adam Smith, considered by many to be the Father of Modern Economics, was born in Kirkcaldy, Scotland, on June 16, 1723. His father, also... The post An Economist’s Solution to the War: Adam Smith and the Rebelling Colonies appeared first on Journal...

“The Committee reserve all the printed Copies”

On Monday, 26 Mar 1770, 250 years ago today, the inhabitants of Boston once again gathered in Faneuil Hall for a town meeting. Technically, this was a continuation of the meeting they had adjourned the week before.To discourage various sorts of bad behavior,...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Mar 2020

“A youth, son to Captain John Gore”

The older boy wounded by Ebenezer Richardson’s shot on 22 Feb 1770 was nineteen-year-old Samuel Gore.He appears here in his early-1750s portrait by John Singleton Copley, a detail from a painting now at Winterthur. Of course, this when Sammy was...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Feb 2020

The Grand Affray at Golden Hill: New York City, January 19, 177

Despite the rescission of the Stamp Act in 1766, many imperial controversies persisted in New York City. Leading among them were: The annual demands of... The post The Grand Affray at Golden Hill: New York City, January 19, 1770 appeared first on...

The Great 1770 Quiz Answers, Part 1

Thanks to everyone who puzzled over the Great 1770 Quiz, whether or not you entered answers in the comments!It looks like the competition is down to John and Kathy since they answered both parts. If I try this again I hope to remember the bunch all the...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Feb 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Dean Caivano on American Colonists’ Growing Resistance to Tyranny

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews Dean Caivano, Lecturer of Political Science at California State University, Stanislaus, on the growing resistance to tyranny as colonists... The post This Week on Dispatches:...

The Fear of Domination: Resistance Against Tyranny

The threat of continued oppression and an encroaching condition of slavery was central to the American colonists’ call for separation from Great Britain and... The post The Fear of Domination: Resistance Against Tyranny appeared first on Journal...

This Week on Dispatches: Steven Neill on the British East India Company and the American Revolution

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor Steven Neill on William Pitt’s 1767 proposal to tax the East India Company and strengthen trade... The post This Week on Dispatches: Steven Neill on the British...

October 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Pennsylvania Gazette (October 19, 1769). “AMERICAN PAPER HANGINGS, MANUFACTURED in Philadelphia.” Like many other advertisers, Plunket Fleeson, an upholsterer, launched...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Oct 2019

August 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Pennsylvania Gazette (August 10, 1769). “At present it seems peculiarly the interest of America to encourage her own manufactories.” In August 1769, Richard Wistar...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Aug 2019

“Why does not this Man make his Letters publick?”

Thomas Hutchinson wasn’t the first royal governor of Massachusetts to see his letters to officials in London published and pilloried back home. In fact, I think that precedent was a big part of the problem. One of my big ideas about the American...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Apr 2019

“The Indiscretion of a very few Persons of the lowest Class”

The burning of effigies in New York City on 14 Nov 1768 prompted a strong response from the royal governor of that colony, Sir Henry Moore. It came in the form of a message to the colony’s legislature one week later, delivered by a deputy secretary...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Feb 2019

January 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-Hampshire Gazette (January 6, 1769). “Printed on Paper made in New-England.” Daniel Fowle and Robert Fowle, the printers of the New-Hampshire Gazette, found themselves...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Jan 2019

The Sugar Act: A Brief History

The Sugar Act of 1764 levied taxes on imports to British colonies in North America. In doing so, the act marked a change in... The post The Sugar Act: A Brief History appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Talks to Take in about the Townshend Tariffs

This month’s Lowell Lecture Series at the Old South Meeting House, presented by the Paul Revere Memorial Association, focuses on how the new duties of 1767 roiled the British Empire. The series is titled “Lead, Glass, Paper, & Tea: The...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Sep 2018

Deerfield Symposium on “Fashion and Conflict,” 28-30 Sept.

On 28-30 September, Historic Deerfield will host its fall symposium on the topic of “Fashion and Conflict in Early America.”This event is designed to produce “an in-depth look at the broad meanings of conflict on clothing and textiles...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Aug 2018

Reviewing the “Townshend Moment”

A few weeks back, I attended a talk at the Colonial Society of Massachusetts by Prof. Patrick Griffin about his new book, The Townshend Moment: The Making of Empire and Revolution in the Eighteenth Century.Here’s a review of The Townshend Moment...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jul 2018

Behind Massachusetts’s Circular Letter

The story of the Massachusetts Circular Letter of 1768 starts with the previous year’s session of the Massachusetts General Court.That provincial legislature was supposed to reconvene after its spring session on 2 Sept 1767. But that summer Parliament...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jun 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.