The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Trade"

Showing 1 - 20 of 381

Your search for posts with tags containing Trade found 381 posts

Shop tax, or no shop tax?

In support of Lord John Townshend against Lord Samuel Hood in the Westminster election of 1788   Author: Enemy to the Shop Tax. Title: Shop tax, or no shop tax? Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [1788] Catalog Record File 66 788...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 30 Aug 2021

Mrs. Edwards, Paragon, Black Heath

Date based on the February 1813 lease to Mrs. Rebecca Edwards of No. 12 ‘The Paragon’ Blackheath, which appears to have been acquired to open her school for ladies. Engraved throughout; with greek-key and hatchwork border. Text continues with itemized...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 17 Aug 2021

Chinese American Herbal Medicine: A History of Importation and Improvisation

By Tamara Venit Shelton “Chinese herbalists imported everything from China.” This is what I consistently heard from herbalists I interviewed when writing Herbs and Roots: A History of Chinese Doctors in the American Medical Marketplace. As far as...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Jul 2021

Observations on Several Acts of Parliament

The Townshend Revenue Act of 1767 awoke Americans to the fact that import duties for the purpose of revenue were taxes just as much... The post Observations on Several Acts of Parliament appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

June 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Estate of JANE EUSTIS, late of Boston, Shop-keeper.” For several weeks in the spring of 1771 the Massachusetts Spy carried a notice requesting “all those persons who...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Jun 2021

Unearthing a New Acadia

Hilary Doda This post begins an occasional series on Material Histories. Using artifacts as a lens, frameworks from archaeology and other fields of material history can be extremely helpful for historians seeking to incorporate different, often non-literate,...
From: Borealia on 31 May 2021

Observations on the tea and window act

Author: Twining, Richard, 1749-1824, author. Title: Observations on the tea and window act, and on the tea trade / by Richard Twining. Edition: The third edition. Publication: London : Printed for T. Cadell, in the Strand, MDCCLXXXV [1785] Catalog...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Apr 2021

Barbers and (the lack of!) Polite Advertising

Over the past few years, I have spent much time looking at ‘polite’ advertising in the 18th century. During this period, a whole range of retailers advertised their goods and services to appeal to ladies and gentlemen of taste. Without discussing...
From: DrAlun on 1 Apr 2021

Traders or Traitors? The New Jersey Shop License Law of 178

Following the campaign of 1776, New York City and environs were occupied by British forces. For the rest of the war, George Washington threatened,... The post Traders or Traitors? The New Jersey Shop License Law of 1780 appeared first on Journal of the...

The Circus Origins of Pink Lemonade

By Betsy Golden Kellem Few things whip up an appetite quite like the playground of cotton candy, popcorn, fried food and sweet drinks that accompanies a circus. Pink lemonade in particular has long been associated with the circus, which does not simply...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Feb 2021

Memories of Akara and Acaraje

By Ozoz Sokoh Kitchen Butterfly & Feast Afrique Taste Memories To this day, wherever I am, Nigeria or anywhere else in the world, I have a specific Saturday morning taste memory of bread, ogi and Akara lodged in my head, and heart I daresay. I spent...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Feb 2021

Transnational News and the Irish Free Trade Crisis of 1779

By Joel Herman The gravitational pull of the American Revolution has been given new focus by the transnational turn, as scholars have begun to uncover the influence of the revolution elsewhere in the world.[1] One place where the American revolutionary...
From: Age of Revolutions on 8 Feb 2021

Montesquieu, the Persian Rousseau, and Napoleon’s French Revolution in India

Soltan Hosayn, by Cornelis de Bruijn. (Rijksmuseum) The year 2021 marks the tercentenary of the publication of Montesquieu’s Lettres persanes and the two hundredth anniversary of the death of Napoleon Bonaparte. At first glance, the philosophe who...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 28 Jan 2021

Food Identity Standards and Recipes as Legislation

By Clare Gordon Bettencourt  In 1933, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) organized an exhibit that came to be known as the Chamber of Horrors. The horrors on display were examples of packaging intended to deceive consumers. The...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Jan 2021

4. Meals on Wheels: The “Kitchen Cars” and American Recipes for the Postwar Japanese Diet

By Nathan Hopson From 1956 to 1960, the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) sponsored a fleet of food demonstration buses in Japan (“kitchen cars”) to improve national nutrition and fuel the nation’s economic recovery with more “modern”...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Dec 2020

Jemmy Whittle, the Devil, St Dunstan and the Laughing Boy

The Laughing Boy c.1780 The name James Whittle (1757 – 1818) will no doubt be familiar to readers of The Printshop Window. Whittle and his partner Robert Laurie (1755-1836) co-owned one of eighteenth-century London’s most well-known printshops....
From: The Print Shop Window on 4 Dec 2020

At a Crossroads: Connections and Family Formation in Montréal, 1700-175

Alanna Loucks Montréal was always a crossroads. Located along the St. Lawrence River, the continental highway, the city developed as a space defined by mobility and fluidity. This connected and dynamic character influenced the diverse demographic...
From: Borealia on 30 Nov 2020

November 27

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “At the Sign of the Lion and Mortar.” In the fall of 1770, Philip Godfrid Kast, an apothecary, placed an advertisement in the Essex Gazette to inform potential customers...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 Nov 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.