The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Transcribing"

Your search for posts with tags containing Transcribing found 20 posts

Code Makers: The Hidden Labour Behind the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Recipe Book Corpus

By Elisa Tersigni Last week, EMROC published a blog post called “Code Breakers,” describing the efforts of our Before “Farm to Table” project volunteers, who – like EMROC – transcribe our recipe books. This week’s...
From: emroc on 17 Sep 2019

Code Breakers: The Hidden Labour Behind the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Recipe Book Transcriptions

By Elisa Tersigni As many EMROC readers know, a major component of the Folger Shakespeare Library’s three-year, $1.5M Mellon-funded Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures (BFT) project is the digitizing, transcribing,...
From: emroc on 10 Sep 2019

Cooking in the Baumfylde Kitchen

By Keri Sanburn Behre, Portland State University I had the opportunity to lead a directed study for a graduating student last summer. The student had been interested in taking my early modern literature class focused on early modern women’s writing,...
From: emroc on 31 Jul 2019

Medicine out of Mole-Hairs in Jane Dawson’s Manuscript

By Ashley Gonzalez Though all of Jane Dawson’s recipes are fascinating, perhaps one of the most curious ones involved the medical use of moles for hair loss and hair growth. This interest was noted by multiple people during the Fall … Continue...
From: emroc on 19 Dec 2018

Welcome to Transcribathon 2018!

Thank you for stopping by our transcribathon today. We’re so glad that you’ve decided to join us. We’re kicking things off at the wonderful Wellcome Library in London at 10:00 UK time. The Library is kindly allowing Heather Wolfe (Folger...
From: emroc on 18 Sep 2018

Teaching Transcribathons and Experiential Learning

By Liza Blake This post is one of seven scheduled to appear in The Recipes Project’s upcoming September Teaching Series, which focuses on new ideas and strategies for teaching with recipes. As we all prepare for the next EMROC Transcribathon …...
From: emroc on 21 Aug 2018

Undergraduate Recipe Research Wins PSU Abington Prize

By Marissa Nicosia EMROC member Marissa Nicosia was recognized for her teaching and mentorship of undergraduate researchers with the 2018 Abington College Faculty Senate Outstanding Teaching Award. At the Abington College Undergraduate Research Activities...
From: emroc on 10 Jul 2018

Jamming Out with Rosemary

By Samuel Fatzinger As I was transcribing a recipe manuscript by Elizabeth Bulckley, “A Booke of Hearbes and Receipts,” (compiled in 1627, Wellcome Library) I came across a page title “The Vertues of Rosemary.” While apparently...
From: emroc on 27 Nov 2017

Joining our Transcribathon without experience?

Thinking about joining in #EMROCtranscribes this year, but feeling nervous? Worried about tackling old handwriting? Please read on for some tips from other first-time transcribers, as well as practical guidance on how-to join in! What it is like to join...
From: emroc on 6 Nov 2017

What constitutes a diet drink?

Written by Solveig Roervik While transcribing the Ann Fanshawe manuscript, I came upon a drink called a diet drink. Because of the way the ingredients were suspended in liquid, the recipe resembled a modern herb tea, but in two other manuscripts...
From: emroc on 29 May 2017

To Make a Selebub

Written by Marissa Nicosia Reposted from Cooking in the Archives The day after Christmas I opened my laptop and started transcribing a page of Constance Hall’s recipe book, Folger Shakespeare Library MS V.a.20. I did this every day for twelve days...
From: emroc on 7 Feb 2017

Twelve Days of EMROC

Come join us for 12 celebratory days of transcriptions! From Boxing Day (Dec. 26) to Epiphany (Jan. 6), EMROC is hosting a transcription event in which we invite you to participate by transcribing Constance Hall Her Book of Receipts Anno Domini 1672,...
From: emroc on 7 Dec 2016

Transcribe, Cook, and Post for the Thankful Thanksgiving

For this Thanksgiving, why not try cooking from a seventeenth century recipe? EMROC is hosting a transcribe, cook, and post of FB party as its “Thankful Thanksgiving,” and we invite you to join us. We would like you to transcribe a recipe...
From: emroc on 22 Nov 2016

The Folger Report

Woman distilling. From The accomplished ladies rich closet of rarities, 1691. ImageCredit: Wellcome Library, London. We’ve had a great day at the Folger. It’s been amazingly productive. We’ve learned a lot about early modern chips,...
From: emroc on 9 Nov 2016

By Elaine Leong and Lisa Smith The Folger transcribers. Good morning and Welcome. First, a big shout-out...

By Elaine Leong and Lisa Smith The Folger transcribers. Good morning and Welcome. First, a big shout-out to all participants of the second annual EMROC transcribathon – Thank you for joining us today. At the Folger, the EMROC team (consisting...
From: emroc on 9 Nov 2016

Tips for Transcribing Castleton Today

From Lady Castleton’s book, Folger Shakespeare Library, V.a.600. We’re so pleased that you’ve decided to join us today. Here are some top tips for transcribing today. Just go log on at transcribe.folger.edu with whatever user name you...
From: emroc on 9 Nov 2016

A Summer Project

By Lisa Smith This summer, I had the pleasure of hosting Jessie Foreman as an Undergraduate Research Opportunity Programme student at the University of Essex. Over the summer, she worked on transcriptions for several manuscripts, tweeted occasionally...
From: emroc on 12 Oct 2016

Intern's Report: Getting "Up Close and Personal" With a Common Soldier

 Today's blogger, Erin Weinman, is a history major at Rutgers University.  This post is the story of her favorite project during her summer internship at the David Library of the American Revolution. By Erin Weinman           ...

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.