The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "US Art"

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Your search for posts with tags containing US Art found 44 posts

History Today: Hans Holbein: The Artist in a Changing World by Jeanne Nuechterlein

In Augsburg’s Staatsgalerie Altdeutsche Meister there is a three-paneled painting illustrating the life of St Paul, painted by local artist Hans Holbein the Elder in 1504. Commissioned for the city’s Dominican convent of St Katherine, it includes,...
From: Mathew Lyons on 30 Sep 2020

Wife Selling in 17C-19C Britain & her American colonies

Sale of a Wife in Smithfield MarketNow is your time gemmen; here's my Fat Heifer and ten pounds worth of bad Halfpence, all for half a Guinea, why her Hide's worth more to a Tanner; I'll warrant She's Beef to the Heels, and tho' her Horns ben't Wisible,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 10 May 2020

The Haube, a Simple Cap For 18tC Pennsylvania Moravian Sisters

Unknown Artist, Moravian Single Sister, Moravian Historical Society, Nazareth, PAThe head-covering worn is this painting is a Schwestern Haube, a sister's cap. A Haube is a simple, close-fitting cap worn by Moravian women, sometimes referred to as a Schneppel...
From: 18th-century American Women on 26 Apr 2020

Abigail Smith Adams 1744-1818 At Home, Often Without Husband John

Abigail Smith was born on November 11, 1744, in Weymouth, Massachusetts, the 2nd child of Elizabeth Quincy Smith & the Reverend William Smith. Her father was pastor of Weymouth's North Parish Congregational Church.  Carrying out the practical...
From: 18th-century American Women on 12 Apr 2020

First Lady Abigail Adams hung the wash in the unfinished East Room

Abigail Adams Supervises the Hanging of the Laundry in the Unfinished East Room of the White House, painting by Gordon Phillips sometime around 1950.When the 2nd US President John Adams family moved into the White House, First Lady Abigail Adams hung...
From: 18th-century American Women on 1 Jul 2018

Waterside in 18C America

American Fireboard, 1790 Comtemplation by the Shore Probably Massachusetts Artist Unknown
From: 18th-century American Women on 6 Apr 2020

1739 Tales about Older Women & Scoundrels in Benjamin Franklin's Pennsylvania Gazette

In the 18C American colonies, unmarried woman & widows could accumulate money & property in their names; but as soon as they married, all of their assets became the property of their husbands. 1739 Attributed to Pieter Vanderlyn (American colonial...
From: 18th-century American Women on 4 Apr 2020

Portrait of 18C American Woman by a Garden Fountain

;1763 John Singleton Copley (Colonial American artist, 1738-1815). Mary Turner (Mrs. Daniel Sargent).By the 18C in colonial America, artists sometimes portrayed women & girls, often the eligible daughters of the patrons commissioning the portraits,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 28 Mar 2020

18C American Women & Children

1726 John Watson (1685-1768). Thysje (Mrs James Henderson) with Margaret, Tessie and James II.1729 John Smibert (1688-1751). Mrs Francis Brinley & son Francis. The Metropolitan Museum of Art tells us that Deborah Lyde, Mrs. Francis Brinley...
From: 18th-century American Women on 26 Mar 2020

1752 Portrait of a New York Girl by an Unknown Artist

Catherina Elmendorf 1752 Artist UnknownThe Metropolitan Museum of Art tells us that Catherina Elmendorf (b. 1747) was a daughter of Petrus Edmundus Elmendorf (1715–1765) & Mary Crooke (b. 1721) of Kingston, New York. The artist, who remains...
From: 18th-century American Women on 24 Mar 2020

Louisiana 18C - Race determined the Woma's place in the Social Hierarchy & even mandated Headwear

The tignon was the mandatory headwear for Creole women in Louisiana during the Spanish colonial period, and the style was adopted throughout the Caribbean island communities as well. This headdress was required by Louisiana laws in 1785. Called the...
From: 18th-century American Women on 23 Mar 2020

18C American Women - Henrietta Johnston 1674-1729

1711 Henrietta Johnston (1674-1729) Henriette Charlotte de Chastaigner (Mrs Nathaniel Broughton) Early in the 18C, many of the portraits of Southern colonial gentle ladies were done by Henrietta Johnston (1675-1729). She was the first identified pastelist...
From: 18th-century American Women on 22 Mar 2020

Portraits by the only known enslaved painter in colonial British America

Prince Demah Barnes 1773 William Duguid, Boston, Massachusetts. Metropolitan Museum of ArtThe Metropolitan Museum of Art tells us that William Duguid, a Scottish immigrant textile importer based in Boston, is the subject of this engaging portrait....
From: 18th-century American Women on 18 Mar 2020

1729 Portrait of an American Family

1729 John Smibert (American colonial era artist, 1688-1751). The Bermuda GroupFamily portraits are rare in the early 18C British American colonies, perhaps because they were expensive & usually so large, that they required a sizable public parlor...
From: 18th-century American Women on 3 Jan 2020

Portrait of 18C American Woman

Anna Maria Lawatsch. Johann Valentin Haidt (1700-1780) Moravian Archives, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
From: 18th-century American Women on 14 Aug 2019

Portrait of 18C American Woman

Widow Catharina Huber. Johann Valentin Haidt (1700-1780) Moravian Archives, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.Moravian women, whose chief duty was to their community & God, not to their family, husband, or self, worked jobs benefiting the larger community....
From: 18th-century American Women on 8 Aug 2019

Portrait of 18C American Woman

Mrs. Gertraut Graff. Johann Valentin Haidt (1700-1780) Moravian Archives, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.Moravian women, whose chief duty was to their community & God, not to their family, husband, or self, worked jobs benefiting the larger community. They...
From: 18th-century American Women on 31 Jul 2019

Portrait of 18C American Woman

Miss Anna Rosina Anders. Johann Valentin Haidt (1700-1780) Moravian Archives, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.Moravian women, whose chief duty was to their community & God, not to their family, husband, or self, worked jobs benefiting the larger community....
From: 18th-century American Women on 25 Jul 2019

18C Portrait of an American Woman

Mrs. John Winthrop 1773 John Singleton Copley (American, Boston, Massachusetts 1738–1815 London) The Metropolitan Museum of Art tells us that Hannah Fayerweather (1727–1790) was the daughter of Thomas and Hannah Waldo Fayerweather. She was...
From: 18th-century American Women on 9 Jan 2017

Portrait of 18C American Woman

Miss Anna Nitschmann. Johann Valentin Haidt (1700-1780) Moravian Archives, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.Moravian women, whose chief duty was to their community & God, not to their family, husband, or self, worked jobs benefiting the larger community. They...
From: 18th-century American Women on 15 Jul 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.