The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "US History"

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Your search for posts with tags containing US History found 200 posts

The Moravian Holy Spirit as Mother

The Holy Spirit as Mother Dr. Craig D. Atwood of the Moravian Theological Seminary"One of the least known & most intriguing parts of Zinzendorf’s theology is his use of the word "Mother" to describe the Holy Spirit. This was not just a passing...
From: 18th-century American Women on 28 Apr 2020

The Haube, a Simple Cap For 18tC Pennsylvania Moravian Sisters

Unknown Artist, Moravian Single Sister, Moravian Historical Society, Nazareth, PAThe head-covering worn is this painting is a Schwestern Haube, a sister's cap. A Haube is a simple, close-fitting cap worn by Moravian women, sometimes referred to as a Schneppel...
From: 18th-century American Women on 26 Apr 2020

Moravian Women during the 18C Century

Moravian Women during the 18C Century by Beverly Prior Smaby"A remarkable painting by Johann Valentin Haidt tells us a great deal about the roles of Moravian women during Zinzendorf's time. It depicts a session of the Moravian synod held at Herrnhut...
From: 18th-century American Women on 24 Apr 2020

Count Nicholas Ludwig von Zinzendorf & American Moravian Men & Women

Count Nicholas Ludwig von Zinzendorf by - Rev John Jackman"Nicholas Ludwig, Count Zinzendorf, was born in Dresden in 1700. He was very much a part of the Pietist movement in Germany, which emphasized personal piety & an emotional component to the...
From: 18th-century American Women on 22 Apr 2020

The Baptists in the 17C & 18C Carolinas - Hundreds of Converts

Paul Revere Print of Submersion BaptismThe Palmer Movement of Southern Free Will Baptists, 1685-1865Southern Free Will Baptists have generally traced their ancestry back to the ministry of Paul Palmer, who in 1727 established the first known Free...
From: 18th-century American Women on 18 Apr 2020

American Biography - 1733 Woman's hilarious tale of her husband & the healing powers of tea

1720s Joseph van Aken (1699-1749) Detail A Family at TeaThis story about the miraculous virtues of tea was printed in the 1733 Pennsylvania Gazette. Tea was reportedly introduced into the British American colonies in 1714. This hilarious...
From: 18th-century American Women on 14 Apr 2020

Abigail Smith Adams 1744-1818 At Home, Often Without Husband John

Abigail Smith was born on November 11, 1744, in Weymouth, Massachusetts, the 2nd child of Elizabeth Quincy Smith & the Reverend William Smith. Her father was pastor of Weymouth's North Parish Congregational Church.  Carrying out the practical...
From: 18th-century American Women on 12 Apr 2020

Abigail & John Adams disagreed about women's suffrage

Abigail Smith Adams (1744-1818) was a smart, independent woman who said what she believed. Although she had strong feelings about women having an equal voice in the new United States of America, women would not get the right to vote in national elections...
From: 18th-century American Women on 8 Apr 2020

1739 Tales about Older Women & Scoundrels in Benjamin Franklin's Pennsylvania Gazette

In the 18C American colonies, unmarried woman & widows could accumulate money & property in their names; but as soon as they married, all of their assets became the property of their husbands. 1739 Attributed to Pieter Vanderlyn (American colonial...
From: 18th-century American Women on 4 Apr 2020

Lady Washington - Martha 1731-18

1771-81 Lady Washington Attributed to Samuel Blyth (English, 1744-1795)As some of the British referred to her, Lady Washington - Martha Dandridge Custis Washington was born at Chestnut Grove in New Kent County, Virginia, June 2, 1731. Her father,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 31 Mar 2020

Quarantine in the Northwest: The Hudson’s Bay Company’s Measures to Stop the 1779-1783 Smallpox Epidemic

Scott Berthelette Near the end of the summer of 1782, Hudson’s Bay Company chief factor of York Factory, Matthew Cocking lamented: “Never has a Letter in Hudson’s Bay conveyed more doleful Tidings than this… Much the greatest...
From: Borealia on 30 Mar 2020

Ideas on Civility for Congress - Publisher’s wife, Margaret Bayard Smith had not met Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson by Thaddeus KosciuszkoI abhor the lack of civility in our recent political activities. I remember that Thomas Jefferson was concerned about decorum and process in our Congress, most especially the Senate, over which he presided as Vice...
From: 18th-century American Women on 29 Mar 2020

Slave Trader Muslim Ayuba Suleiman Diallo 1701-1773 - Stolen from Africa sent to Maryland to England & back to his wives & children in Africa

Portrait of Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, (1701-1773) by William Hoare (English artist, 1707-1792)  Ayuba Suleiman Diallo [Job Ben Solomon] (c.1701–1773), Muslim cleric & slave, was born about 1701 in Bundu, west Africa, the son of a prominent...
From: 18th-century American Women on 25 Mar 2020

Louisiana 18C - Race determined the Woma's place in the Social Hierarchy & even mandated Headwear

The tignon was the mandatory headwear for Creole women in Louisiana during the Spanish colonial period, and the style was adopted throughout the Caribbean island communities as well. This headdress was required by Louisiana laws in 1785. Called the...
From: 18th-century American Women on 23 Mar 2020

Portraits by the only known enslaved painter in colonial British America

Prince Demah Barnes 1773 William Duguid, Boston, Massachusetts. Metropolitan Museum of ArtThe Metropolitan Museum of Art tells us that William Duguid, a Scottish immigrant textile importer based in Boston, is the subject of this engaging portrait....
From: 18th-century American Women on 18 Mar 2020

November & December, 1765 - America Unites Against The Stamp Act - Taxation without Representation

Defense of the American colonies in the French and Indian War (1754-63) and Pontiac's Rebellion (1763-64) were costly affairs for Great Britain, and Prime Minister George Grenville hoped to recover some of these costs by taxing the colonists. On February...
From: 18th-century American Women on 16 Mar 2020

The Unquiet Hymnbook in the Early United States

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Christopher N. Phillips It’s not much to look at....
From: Age of Revolutions on 2 Mar 2020

St. Philomena(‘s) Remains: Religion, Sentiment, and Patriarchy Undermined in Post-Revolutionary France

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Jennifer Popiel The bones of Saint Philomena were discovered...
From: Age of Revolutions on 20 Jan 2020

Newberry Library Graduate Student Conference

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is hosting its annual Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference on 23-25 January 2020. Here is the announcement from the Center for Renaissance Studies: CRS announces the schedule for the...

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.