The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "USA"

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Your search for posts with tags containing USA found 493 posts

Jane Austen’s Influence on Georgette Heyer by Susannah Fullerton

Inquiring Readers, I discovered that Susanna Fullerton, President of the Jane Austen Society of Australia and Austen author is as much of a fan of Georgette Heyer as I am, perhaps more. This delightful article compares and contrasts the writings of Jane...
From: Jane Austen's World on 6 Sep 2020

Murder in Lausanne: The Death of an English Regicide in Exile

The Reformed Church of St François in Lausanne in the 19th century. On Thursday, 11 August 1664 the Englishman John Lisle was shot dead in bright daylight on his way to church in Lausanne. His killers had been observing his moves. They knew his...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 5 Sep 2020

New Book: “Representing Women’s Political Identity”

Representing Women’s Political Identity in the Early Modern Iberian World, Jeremy Roe and Jean Andrews, eds (Routledge, 2020). Introduction by Jeremy Roe and Jean Andrews Part I: The politics of non-elite devotional identities in textual,...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 3 Sep 2020

A Painter Abroad: John Singleton Copley Writes to His Wife

It may have been Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s patriotic paean that belatedly canonized a heroic horseman as a key figure of the American Revolution, but... The post A Painter Abroad: John Singleton Copley Writes to His Wife appeared first on Journal...

Lines Written by a New York Homeless Woman

By Stephen Basdeo I recently came across a fascinating book titled Darkness and Daylight; or, Lights and Shadows of New York Life (1891), which formed the basis of another post on this blog. Inspired by books such as Henry Mayhew’s London Labour...

Jack’s Story: The True Story of a Poor Boy in 19th-Century New York

By Stephen Basdeo I recently came across a fascinating book titled Darkness and Daylight; or, Lights and Shadows of New York Life (1891). Inspired by books such as Henry Mayhew’s London Labour and the London Poor (1851), Andrew Mearns The Bitter...

Jennifer Ehle Reads Pride & Prejudice and More

Thank you, Ellen Moody, for posting this information on my Jane Austen and Her Regency World Facebook group page.  Isolation has just become a little better. Jennifer is still my favorite Lizzie Bennet. Armchair Travelers: In other news, visit Chawton...
From: Jane Austen's World on 24 Apr 2020

A Trip to Chawton Cottage by Susan Branch

Inquiring readers, During the Covid-19 lock down, I’ve missed traveling around my country. I intended to go abroad as well, but had to lay those plans aside. The internet affords me a way to satisfy my wanderlust. Today as I e-searched Jane Austen’s...
From: Jane Austen's World on 23 Apr 2020

“The Doctor proposes to Inoculate our little Fellow”

SUSAN LIVINGSTON (1748-1840) was the oldest daughter of William Livingston and Susannah French. (The couple had thirteen children.) Her father was the governor of New Jersey, a member of the Continental Congresses, and a brigadier general in the New Jersey...
From: In the Words of Women on 15 Apr 2020

Thomas More, Utopia (1685), translated by Gilbert Burnet

As this blogging site indicates the vast majority of discoveries tend to be inscriptions of a single owner. Yet bibliophilism was not always an individual hobby and book ownership was certainly not a private matter. Collective ownership involving women...

April 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Seeds.” It was a sign of spring.  Just as advertisements for almanacs told readers of colonial newspapers that fall had arrived and the new year was coming, advertisements...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Apr 2020

March 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “All sorts of English Goods, imported before the Non-importation Agreement took place.” Richard Draper, printer of the Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News-Letter,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Mar 2020

March 5

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Large Marrowfats, early Charlston.” Susanna Renken and Abigail Davidson were the first in 1770.  Spring was on the way.  Newspaper advertisements for garden...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 5 Mar 2020

The Frugal Houswife Available in America 177

.Pehr Hilleström (Swedish artist, 1732-1816) A Maid Taking Soup from a Cauldron A cookbook available in the early American republic wasSusannah CarterThe Frugal Housewife, or Complete Woman Cook;...Also The Making of English Wines. New York: G. &...
From: 18th-century American Women on 1 Feb 2020

Book Review: ‘Killing Beauties’ by Pete Langman

KILLING BEAUTIES is a gripping historical fiction novel set during the Protectorate of the 1650s and focuses on the underworld of espionage through the actions of the main character, Susan Hyde. Susan, sister to Edward Hyde (he who is best known for being...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 13 Jan 2020

‘The Perils of Being an Early-Modern Bottle-Blonde’ – A Guest Post by Pete Langman

It’s quite usual to compliment the author of a work of historical fiction on their research, even though this doesn’t mean much more than ‘we’ve read the same history books’, but there is something to be said for appropriating...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 10 Jan 2020

The Voyage of Nathaniel Balch

Earlier this year I introduced the figure of Nathaniel Balch, a hatter who was prominent in Boston society before and after the Revolutionary War. Balch was close to Revolutionary leaders, particularly John Hancock. In August 1769, Balch entertained at...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Dec 2019

The Last Crusade: Napoleon and the Knights Hospitaller

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Thomas Lecaque Knights on horseback, charging beneath...
From: Age of Revolutions on 16 Dec 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.