The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "USA"

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Your search for posts with tags containing USA found 478 posts

The Frugal Houswife Available in America 177

.Pehr Hilleström (Swedish artist, 1732-1816) A Maid Taking Soup from a Cauldron A cookbook available in the early American republic wasSusannah CarterThe Frugal Housewife, or Complete Woman Cook;...Also The Making of English Wines. New York: G. &...
From: 18th-century American Women on 1 Feb 2020

Book Review: ‘Killing Beauties’ by Pete Langman

KILLING BEAUTIES is a gripping historical fiction novel set during the Protectorate of the 1650s and focuses on the underworld of espionage through the actions of the main character, Susan Hyde. Susan, sister to Edward Hyde (he who is best known for being...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 13 Jan 2020

‘The Perils of Being an Early-Modern Bottle-Blonde’ – A Guest Post by Pete Langman

It’s quite usual to compliment the author of a work of historical fiction on their research, even though this doesn’t mean much more than ‘we’ve read the same history books’, but there is something to be said for appropriating...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 10 Jan 2020

The Voyage of Nathaniel Balch

Earlier this year I introduced the figure of Nathaniel Balch, a hatter who was prominent in Boston society before and after the Revolutionary War. Balch was close to Revolutionary leaders, particularly John Hancock. In August 1769, Balch entertained at...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Dec 2019

The Last Crusade: Napoleon and the Knights Hospitaller

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Thomas Lecaque Knights on horseback, charging beneath...
From: Age of Revolutions on 16 Dec 2019

An Eighteenth-Century Crusade: The War Against Revolutionary France and the Origins of Modern Catholicism, 1789-99

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Glauco Schettini “Today is the day,” an alarmed...
From: Age of Revolutions on 11 Dec 2019

Lack of Foresight – Fortune Telling

We have previously written about fortune telling, a matter which was very popular during the Georgian era, so today we have a couple of short stories to share with you on the subject. In April 1801 John Rowe was indicted for defrauding Sarah Hall of the...
From: All Things Georgian on 19 Nov 2019

Reading Between the Lines of a Postal Card Henry Folger Sent in 1879

By Stephen Grant My first descent into the underground vault at the Folger Shakespeare Library took place in 2007 during a short-term Folger fellowship. With a tape measure stuffed into a side pocket, I trailed Betsy Walsh, head of reader services, as...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 19 Sep 2019

Making Musk Julep: Sugar Coating a Bitter Medicine

By Susan Brandt Popular eighteenth-century pharmacopoeias often included animal-based substances such as musk, which might seem nauseating to the modern palate. In The New Dispensatory Containing the Theory and Practice of Pharmacy (London, 1753),...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Jul 2019

Robin Hood the Angry Letter Writer

By Stephen Basdeo Many people have adopted the name of Robin Hood over the years. The most obvious ones which spring to mind are the men who appear in medieval court records, being criminals who adopted the alias. The press today even applies the name...

“My Poor Nerves”: Women of a Certain Age on the Page

Portrait of a Lady (1768), John Russell, 1745–1806, British. Oil on Canvas. Yale Center for British Art, Bequest of John N. and Dorothy C. Estabrook. When Mrs. Bennet complains of her “poor nerves” and her husband sardonically replies...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 6 Jun 2019

No Longer a “Dark Age”: Susan Oosthuizen’s “The Emergence of the English” (2019)

By Stephen Basdeo Professor Susan Oosthuizen’s The Emergence of the English (2019) is a lively and engaging book which takes aim at many widely and long-held assumptions about the emergence of an “English” people in the British Isles...

Paying for Shakespeare: Henry Folger’s Checks

By Stephen H. Grant On the Ides of March five years ago, Johns Hopkins University Press released Collecting Shakespeare: The Story of Henry and Emily Folger, the first biography written about the founders of the Folger Shakespeare Library. During the...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 5 Apr 2019

March 28

GUEST CURATOR: Sean Duda What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Essex Gazette (March 28, 1769). “A fresh Assortment of Garden Seeds.” In this advertisement for seeds Benjamin Coats mentioned beans, peas,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Mar 2019

Eighteenth-century wedding cakes

As it’s Valentine’s day we thought we would have a romantic post, however, this has become a confusing one instead and one for which we don’t as yet has a conclusive answer. Everywhere we have looked to find out more about tiered wedding...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 Feb 2019

“The fire was fast approaching the building”

Returning to The Saga of the Brazen Head, I’ll share some Bostonians’ experiences of the Great Fire of 20 Mar 1760, which began after dark in that brazier’s shop.At that time David Mason was a decorative painter four days short of his...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Feb 2019

The Mayflower's Only Surviving Gun.

The Mayflower Wheellock.http://www.nramuseum.org/guns/the-galleries/ancient-firearms-1350-to-1700/case-3-old-guns-in-the-new-world/mayflower-wheellock-carbine.aspxhttp://www.beretta.com/en-us/mayflower-gun/
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 4 Jan 2019

Turtles, Turtles, Turtles - Food & Drink at 18C American New Year's gatherings

In 1774 John Adams recorded in his diary on several special occasions enjoying the turtle on the dinner table, while visiting Philadelphia for the First Continental Congress. 1774 Septr. 11. "Dined at Mr. Willings, who is a Judge of the Supream Court...
From: 18th-century American Women on 1 Jan 2019

New Book: De Sousa, “The Portuguese Slave Trade in Early Modern Japan”

Lúcio De Sousa, The Portuguese Slave Trade in Early Modern Japan: Merchants, Jesuits, and Japanese, Chinese, and Korean Slaves (Brill, 2018).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 12 Dec 2018

No point in legalizing weed for recreational use

By Adam Ramos Adam Ramos delves into the recent past to see if the promised benefits from legalizing marijuana for recreational use in some parts of the United States have been realized. Marijuana has never been a controversy in the United States until...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.