The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Upper Canada"

Your search for posts with tags containing Upper Canada found 15 posts

Liberal-Whig History

Robert W. Passfield What has been termed ‘Whig History’ is a Liberal historiography that views history teleologically in terms of the progress of humanity towards enlightenment, rationalism, scientism, secularism, and the freedom of the individual....
From: Borealia on 6 Apr 2020

Jacksonian America and the Canadian Rebellion – A Review by Mark R. Cheathem

[This review, by an American-based scholar, is the second in a two-part series on Revolutions across Borders; a first, by a Canadian-based scholar, appeared on 13 January – Editors.] Mark R. Cheathem Maxime Dagenais and Julien Mauduit, eds., Revolutions...
From: Borealia on 20 Jan 2020

Jacksonian America and the Canadian Rebellion – A Review by Stephen R. I. Smith

[This review, by a Canadian-based scholar, is the first in a two-part series on Revolutions across Borders; a second, by an American-based scholar, will appear on 20 January – Editors.] Stephen R. I. Smith Maxime Dagenais and Julien Mauduit, eds.,...
From: Borealia on 13 Jan 2020

“Not one penny from an Irishman”: the religious and financial engagement of Irish workers with the Roman Catholic Church on the Rideau Canal, 1831

Laura J. Smith Buried within the papers of a World War One Chaplain is a remarkable record of the religious and financial engagement of Irish Catholic canal workers with the Roman Catholic Church in Upper Canada.[1] Meticulous notes penned by the Rev....
From: Borealia on 8 Apr 2019

Appraising Affect in the Transatlantic Correspondence of Richard Popham and John Large

Michael Borsk When the Irish merchant Richard Popham found that his fortunes in New York had turned sour during the fall of 1826, he penned a letter to his acquaintance living in Upper Canada, John Large. “My mind is in a dreadful state of agitation,”...
From: Borealia on 19 Nov 2018

Anguish in the Loyalist Archives, Part

Editor’s note: This is the second of two essays on working with online databases to research loyalist history in Upper Canada. They originally appeared in the Autumn of 2016 in a slightly different form as part of a longer series at the group history...
From: Borealia on 12 Jul 2017

Anguish in the Loyalist Archives, Part 1

Paula Dumas Editor’s note: This is the first of two essays on working with online databases to research Loyalist history in Upper Canada. They originally appeared in the Autumn of 2016 in a slightly different form as part of a longer series at the...
From: Borealia on 10 Jul 2017

Harriet Tubman and Andrew Jackson: A Match Made in the U.S. Treasury Department

dann j. Broyld & Matthew Warshauer Note: This essay, with its cross-border themes, is being jointly posted by Borealia and The Republic, the new blog of the Society of Historians of the Early American Republic (SHEAR). Borealia is grateful for The...
From: Borealia on 13 Jun 2016

Early Canadian Environmental History Series: Introduction & Essential Reading

Sean Kheraj and Denis McKim Welcome to a series on early Canadian environmental history, jointly hosted by Borealia and The Otter ~ La Loutre, the blog of The Network in Canadian History and Environment (NiCHE). This joint series...
From: Borealia on 16 May 2016

Settling Captain Rock: Transplanting the Irish Agrarian Rebellion in Upper Canada, 1823-4

Laura J. Smith In the summer of 1824 the British Colonial Office instructed the Upper Canadian government to give a soon-to-arrive Irish emigrant named John Dundon a “gratuitous” land grant of 200 acres and provisions for a year.[1] Such assistance...
From: Borealia on 4 Apr 2016

File M and the Straightness of the Settler State in Early Canada

Jarett Henderson Preserved among the Papers of the Executive Council of Upper Canada, themselves an archive of the settler colonial project in northern North America, is File M: “Correspondence re Markland Investigation.”[1] Compiled by an...
From: Borealia on 18 Jan 2016

La « Révolution canadienne », la république américaine, et … l’esclavage?

Maxime Dagenais Nous connaissons tous l’histoire des Rébellions de 1837-38 : l’histoire des Patriotes du Bas-Canada et des « reformers » du Haut-Canada, leurs victoires et leurs défaites, les expulsions,...
From: Borealia on 2 Nov 2015

The “Canadian Revolution,” the Early American Republic, and … Slavery?

Maxime Dagenais We all know the story of the Upper and Lower Canadian Rebellions: we know about the patriotes of Lower Canada and the reformers of Upper Canada; we know about the victories and defeats, expulsions and executions; we know about the social,...
From: Borealia on 2 Nov 2015

‘Déjà Vu All Over Again’? The Upper Canadian Election of 1836 and the Canadian Federal Election of 2015

Denis McKim Disappointing economic growth, especially in comparison to the United States; controversy surrounding immigration from a strife-plagued land; and a communications strategy designed to benefit conservative forces while discrediting their progressive...
From: Borealia on 5 Oct 2015

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.