The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Urban History"

Showing 1 - 20 of 23

Your search for posts with tags containing Urban History found 23 posts

Diversity in Historical Re-enactments

Colonial Williamsburg, one of the most important sites for historical re-enactment in the United States, is increasingly stressing diversity issues in its historical interpretations of colonial American society. The community of Williamsburg, Virginia,...

Remembering the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921

The New York Times has published an interactive reconstruction of the predominantly African American neighborhood of Greenwood and mapped the brutal violence of the armed White crowd that destroyed it during the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921. This...

New Research at Cahokia Mounds Site in Illinois

New archaeological excavations at Cahokia, Illinois, have been investigating evidence of deforestation and flooding at the site of a major indigenous urban center. The New York Times reports that “A thousand years ago, a city rose on the banks...

“Lost Golden City” Discovered in Egypt

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of an important ancient Egyptian city near the modern city of Luxor. The archaeological excavations began in September 2020 and seem to be revealing the “lost golden city” of Akhenaten. National...

Digital Humanities Confronts Cubism

Digital Humanities methods are increasingly used in humanities research, teaching, and presentation through a myriad of techniques. Digital tools and methods offer possibilities of analyzing texts, images, objects, and artifacts in different ways...

At a Crossroads: Connections and Family Formation in Montréal, 1700-175

Alanna Loucks Montréal was always a crossroads. Located along the St. Lawrence River, the continental highway, the city developed as a space defined by mobility and fluidity. This connected and dynamic character influenced the diverse demographic...
From: Borealia on 30 Nov 2020

WFH 2: Tradesmen and Tools for Working from Home, Chapter 1

For this second instalment of ‘Working from Home’ in early modern England, I’m going to take a look at some of the tools and materials urban individuals used as part of their trade in two posts. The first looks at the wider uses of tools...
From: Middling Culture on 21 Apr 2020

Occupation of Paris after the Napoleonic Wars

My French history colleague and friend, Christine Haynes, discusses her new book on the occupation of Paris at the end of the Napoleonic Wars in a podcast of The Siècle. Christine Haynes’s book is entitled, Our Friends the Enemies: The Occupation...

Golden Hill Roundtable: Retracing Mr. Smith’s Steps Through Eighteenth-Century Manhattan

Today, Katy Lasdow uses digital maps to retrace Mr. Smith's steps through eighteenth-century Manhattan in our Golden Hill roundtable.
From: The Junto on 5 Jul 2018

Voices of Authority: Towards a history from below in patchwork

This post is intended to very briefly describe a project I am about halfway through - that seeks to experiment with the new permeability that digital technologies seem to make possible - to create a more usable 'history from below', made up of lives knowable...
From: Historyonics on 27 Apr 2015

Urbanism Kolkata Style

I recently spent a week at a workshop in Kolkata organised by the British Library and the National Library of India, designed to lay the foundations for a project to digitise early Bengali Books (1778-1914).  In many respects it was a wonderful experience,...
From: Historyonics on 20 Jan 2017

A Revolution Within the Revolución: Global Labor Politics in Mexico City

By Stephan Fender On May 25 1911, long-standing dictator Porfirio Díaz famously conceded defeat to his challenger Francisco I. Madero. This event marked the beginning of a long and bloody national power struggle in Mexico that lasted at least...
From: Age of Revolutions on 25 Jul 2016

Urbanités: Geography, culture, and urban spaces at IHAF 2015

Daniel Simeone The theme of the 2015 annual meeting of the Institut d’histoire amérique française (Institute for the History of French North America), the principal French-language conference for historians of Quebec and French-speaking...
From: Borealia on 4 Nov 2015

African Americans, Mobility, and the Law

Robert Gamble argues that the recent protests over the death of Freddie Gray are part of a long trajectory of questions about mobility for African Americans in American cities, in particular Baltimore.
From: The Junto on 11 May 2015

Paris, Ville de Cour ?

Conférence de Caroline zum Kolk will present a lecture on “Paris, Ville de Cour ?” as part of the “Les Mardis de Lauzun” lecture series at the Institut d’Études Avancées de Paris. Mardi 03 Février 2015, 18h00 –...

Seneca Village Memory: The Problem of Forgetting

In today's guest post, Alexander Manevitz considers the way New York has remembered—or forgotten—Seneca Village, a vibrant antebellum black community in what is now Central Park.
From: The Junto on 28 Jul 2014

Using Local History in the Survey: City Streets

Jonathan Wilson discusses a writing assignment that invites students to write the history of their neighborhoods.
From: The Junto on 22 Jan 2014

Next AHRC workshop announced – Museum of London Cheapside Hoard Exhibition

It’s time to register for the next workshop! Come and join us to continue the discussion about the relationship between different kinds of pre-modern materiality and how we analyse and display them… Following on from the first two in the series...
From: Material Histories on 24 Oct 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.