The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Victor Hugo"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Victor Hugo found 47 posts

Victor Hugo’s Early Modern Outlaw Play: “Hernani” (1830)

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and lecturer based in Leeds, UK. He researches the life and works of several British and French ‘mysteries’ authors including George W.M. Reynolds, Pierce Egan the Younger, Eugene Sue, and Victor Hugo. He is also currently...

Victor Hugo’s “Ninety-Three” (1874) | Stephen Basdeo

Thus the guillotine had a right to say to the tower: “I am thy daughter.”[1] …So wrote Victor Hugo in Ninety-Three (1874). By the time that Hugo had published Ninety-Three—his final novel—he had been witness to some of the defining events...

Mocking Louis Phillippe in Exile (1848) | Victor Hugo

After Victor Hugo’s death, and before the publication of his letters (many of which remain unpublished), Paul Maurice published Memoirs of Victor Hugo. This was not chronological autobiography but was, as Maurice remarked, “A sort of haphazard...

Louis XVI’s Execution: An Eyewitness Account | Leboucher

After Victor Hugo’s death, and before the publication of his letters (many of which remain unpublished), Paul Maurice published Memoirs of Victor Hugo. This was not chronological autobiography but was, as Maurice remarked, “A sort of haphazard...

The Morning of Life (1822) | Victor Hugo

The mist of the morning is torn by the peaks, Old towers gleam white in the ray, And already the glory so joyously seeks The lark that’s saluting the day. Then smile away, man, at the heavens so fair, Though, were you swept hence in the...

Suicide of Antonin Moyne (1849) | Victor Hugo

After Victor Hugo’s death, and before the publication of his letters (many of which remain unpublished), Paul Maurice published Memoirs of Victor Hugo. This was not chronological autobiography but was, as Maurice remarked, “A sort of haphazard...

Angel or Demon (1835) | Victor Hugo

Angel or demon! thou,—whether of light The minister, or darkness—still dost sway This age of ours; thine eagle’s soaring flight Bears us, all breathless, after it away. The eye that from thy presence fain would stray, Shuns thee in...

To the Man Who Betrayed a Woman to her Foes (1832) | Victor Hugo

The following poem was written by Victor Hugo in 1832 and related the misfortunes of the Duchess of Berri. It was published in Hugo’s Songs of Twilight (1836) collection, translated by G.W.M. Reynolds. Of the poem Reynolds said The Political notions...

Poland (1833) | Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo‘s poem ‘Poland‘ was originally written in 1833 and published in Les Chants des Crepuscules. It was later translated into English by George W.M. Reynolds in Songs of Twilight (1836), which has recently been published as a single volume,...

Ball at the Hotel-de-Ville (1833) | Victor Hugo

‘Lines Written on a Ball at the Hotel-de-Ville‘ was written by Victor Hugo in 1833 and published in Les Chants du Crepuscule (1835). It was then translated by George W.M. Reynolds and published in Songs of Twilight (1836). Songs of Twilight has recently...

New Edition of Victor Hugo’s Songs of Twilight | Stephen Basdeo and Jessica Elizabeth Thomas

Stephen Basdeo and Jessica Elizabeth Thomas Since the re-branding of this website back in May 2021, its inclusion by Google in its Newsstand app, and this month’s decision by the British Library to officially archive this website’s content...

Napoleon II (1832) | Victor Hugo

The following poem appeared in Victor Hugo’s Chants des Crepuscules (1835) and was translated by G.W.M. Reynolds. It celebrates Napoleon’s son, Napoleon, who died too young and had no contact with father after the emperor was exiled to St Helena....

Bridal Festivity (1832) | Victor Hugo

‘Bridal Festivity’ was written by Victor Hugo in August 1832 and published in his Chants des Crepuscules (1835). This short collection of poetry was then translated by George W.M. Reynolds and published as Songs of Twilight in 1836. The poem itself...

To Some Birds Flown Away (1837) | Victor Hugo

The following poem was written by Victor Hugo in 1837 and translated by Mrs Newton Crossland. (“Enfants! Oh! revenez!”) {XXII, April, 1837}      Children, come back—come back, I say—      You whom my folly chased away ...

The Sacking of the City (1825) | Victor Hugo

The following poem was written by Victor Hugo in 1825 and translated by John Sullivan. It has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo. (“La flamme par ton ordre, O roi!”) {XXIII., November, 1825.} Thy will, O King, is done! Lighting but to...

Three Glorious Days | Victor Hugo

  The following poem, written by Victor Hugo to celebrate the French Revolution of 1830, was translated by Elizabeth Collins. Youth of France, sons of the bold,      Your oak-leaf victor-wreaths behold!      Our civic-laurels—honored...

The Scourge of Heaven (1828) | Victor Hugo

The following poem was written by Victor Hugo and translated by J.N. Fazakerley. It has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo. (“Là, voyez-vous passer, la nuée.”)      {I., November, 1828.}      I.      Hast seen it pass,...

Ode to the Column of Napoleon (1835) | Victor Hugo

The following poem appeared in G.W.M. Reynolds’s translation of Victor Hugo’s Songs of Twilight (1835). It has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo. On the foundation that his glory laid, With indestructible materials made, Alike secure...

Madelaine (1825) | Victor Hugo

The following poem was written by Victor Hugo in 1825 and has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo. (“Ecoute-moi, Madeline.”) (IX., September, 1825). List to me, O Madelaine! Now the snows have left the plain,          Which...

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