The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Victoria"

Showing 1 - 20 of 398

Your search for posts with tags containing Victoria found 398 posts

History is Cool: 1890s Belle Epoque Linen Summer Blouse

Hi all! Well, during this crazy time in human history I managed to start and actually finish one (1) project, an 1890s summer shirtwaist made in lovely white linen.I've been wanting to make a leg o'mutton sleeve blouse (and jacket and sweater and...)...

Stephen Carver’s “Author Who Outsold Dickens” (2020): Biography of a Crime Novelist

By Stephen Basdeo When I was doing my MA dissertation on the cultural history of crime, my supervisor, Dr Heather Shore, advised me to read two now largely forgotten novels: Rookwood (1834) and Jack Sheppard (1839). The heroes of these two novels, respectively,...

Beard Sculpting in the 19th Century.

Over the course of the past four or five years or so, one of the biggest growth areas in the personal grooming industry has been in products for cleaning, styling, or beautifying the beard. A whole host of options are now available, including beard oils,...
From: DrAlun on 18 Mar 2020

Around the Table: Museum Exhibitions

By Sarah Peters Kernan The Christian liturgical season of Lent is upon us. Centuries ago, this was a long and difficult period of fasting in Europe. Some Christians still abstained from all meat and animal products for the forty days of Lent, others undertook...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Mar 2020

Waste Not, Want Not: Interpreting Thrift through Victorian Food Writing

By Lindsay Middleton When you use ‘thrift’ in conversations today, the word carries connotations of frugality and, perhaps, tightfistedness. In mid- to late-nineteenth century, however, the meaning of ‘thrift’ was being reinvigorated....
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Feb 2020

The Working Man’s Robin Hood: The Writings of Allan Cunningham (1784–1842)

By Stephen Basdeo In 1832, the publisher Charles Knight had a bright idea: every Saturday he would publish a new magazine which whose aim was to educate working-class readers about their world. It would not contain news, and would therefore be exempt...

Turkey Figs

I was researching the major tea importers and purveyors in Salem in light of the upcoming anniversary of the Boston Tea Party, but another commodity kept popping up in the sources: turkey figs. I didn’t look at any customs records, but...
From: streets of salem on 14 Dec 2019

The Nevada Statehood Ball - An Evening in 1864

The crew - Abby, Chrissy, me, and Caroline at the Nevada Statehood Ball, 2019 - photo by Chase Stevens.A few posts ago I shared how I refit my 1860s Aubergine evening gown, bringing it back to life for hopefully many more years of wear.Now it's time to...

A Spoopy Day in Virginia City, Nevada

The Spoop-Crew in Virginia City, NV. No actual buckets of blood were consumed, but we thought about it....Several weekends ago a group of friends came to visit us here in Reno.We all decided to invade Virginia City, our local mining-old-west-tourist town,...

Altering My 1860s Evening Gown

Currently on my sewing table is a "simple" alteration to my one-and-only 1860s evening gown. I made this gown, along with a matching day bodice, back in 2014 and over the years it's mysteriously shrunk in the closet.A quick try on to see if letting this...

The Singular Case of the Tiverton Barber

We all know the feeling of paying for something that doesn’t match up with our expectations, or not receiving the service or product we expect for our money. Many of us wouldn’t think twice of complaining, and getting a refund. But would we...
From: DrAlun on 15 Oct 2019

Photo Shoot: An Afternoon in the 1890s

Abby Cox in 1890s splendor in Virginia City, NevadaA little while back, Nicole and Abby got dressed up in late 19th century attire and we dashed up to Virginia City, our local olde westy historical towne, to take a few photos.The gorgeous costumes are...

Exhibition Review: “Food: Bigger than the Plate”

By Catherine Price The Food: Bigger than the Plate exhibition is taking place at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London from May until October 2019. The exhibition takes you on a journey through the four zones of Composting; Farming; Trading; and Eating....
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Aug 2019

Manly beauty: what can boxers tell us about 18th century masculinity? Part III

Boxers The other men in William Hogarth’s March of the Guards to Finchley (1750) that I want to talk about are the boxers. In the painting, so evocatively displayed at London Museum, a bare-knuckle prize-fight takes place in the middle-ground....
From: Joanne Begiato Muses on History on 7 Aug 2019

“The Vision” by Robin Hood (1841)

Everyone of course loves to investigate appearances of the name of Robin Hood in medieval court records. One of these days, it might finally be proven who the “real” Robin Hood was by combing through these patchy records of medieval England....

The scramble for a royal heir

Although George III had 15 children, and all but two of them survived to adulthood, grandchildren – at least legitimate ones – were thin on the ground. In 1817, when the Prince Regent’s daughter, Princess Charlotte of Wales died in childbirth...
From: All Things Georgian on 2 Jul 2019

The Awakening Conscience

By Stephen Basdeo William Holman Hunt’s The Awakening Conscience (1853) is one of my favourite Pre-Raphaelite paintings. Holman Hunt was a religious man and this was a companion piece to another painting of Jesus Christ entitled The Light of the...

Jack Harkaway: The Victorian Harry Potter

By Stephen Basdeo The Victorians in many ways were just like us: they enjoyed a good scandal whenever it was reported in the press, they liked both trashy and high-brow entertainment, and like today, they had their popular heroes adored by both adults...

Traces of Half-Timbering

I was running along the ocean on Lynn Shore Drive when I became progressively 1) tired; and 2) bored so I stopped running and started walking, into the adjacent “Diamond District” of Lynn. Yes, I’m embarrassed to admit that, after a...
From: streets of salem on 16 Jun 2019

Resplendent in 1835 - A Photoshoot

Nicole Rudolph in her c. 1835 ensemble.OK, so it's pretty obvious I'm obsessed with the 1830s now (though I will never stop loving the 18th century deeply). I've made two gowns and I'm just itching to make more, plus the wacky accessories that go with...

Page 1 of 20123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.