The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Virginia"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Virginia found 233 posts

New Book: “Europa y la monarquia de Felipe V”

Europa y la Monarquía de Felipe V, ed. Virginia León Sanz (Silez Univesidad, 2019).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 5 Nov 2019

Guest Post: A (Pedagogically, Geographically, Historiographically) Vast Native History Course

  Today is the first day of Native American Heritage Month, and our guest post comes from Jessica Taylor, Assistant Professor of Oral and Public History, and Edward Polanco, Assistant Professor of Latin American History, both at Virginia Tech....
From: The Junto on 1 Nov 2019

The Unhealthy 17C Chesapeake - Desperate for Women

Life in the American wilderness was nasty, brutish, and short for the earliest Chesapeake settlers; malaria, dysentery, and typhoid took a cruel toll, cutting ten years off the life expectancy of newcomers (half of people born in early Virginia/Maryland...
From: 17th-century American Women on 2 Jun 2017

September 14

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Virginia Gazette [Purdie and Dixon] (September 14, 1769).“RUN away … a Mulatto slave.” The digitization of historical sources has made them much more widely accessible...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Sep 2019

1619 Letter on Tobacco not Slaves from John Pory, Secretary of Virginia

The London Company was an English joint-stock company established in 1606 by royal charter by King James I with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America.Letter on Tobacco not Slaves from John Pory, Secretary of Virginia (1619)John...
From: 17th-century American Women on 29 Aug 2019

The Beeline March: The Birth of the American Army

On a late spring afternoon in 1825, the two Bedinger brothers—Henry and Michael, old men now, seventy-four and sixty-nine respectively, proud immigrants from Alsace-Lorraine—commanded... The post The Beeline March: The Birth of the American...

Major Lawrence Washington of Mount Vernon

Much has been written about George Washington’s lack of formal education and his eager grasp of learning from other men, especially those of status... The post Major Lawrence Washington of Mount Vernon appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

George Mason: The Founding Father Who Gave Us the Bill of Rights

George Mason: The Founding Father Who Gave Us the Bill of Rights by William Hyland, Jr. (Regnery, 2019) Most people have never heard of George... The post George Mason: The Founding Father Who Gave Us the Bill of Rights appeared first on Journal...

Food and Friendship in Early Virginia

The final post in the Roundtable on Food and Hunger in Vast Early America is by Rachel Winchcombe, a cultural historian of early modern England and America. She joined the University of Manchester in September 2017 as a Lecturer in Early Modern History....
From: The Junto on 20 Jun 2019

Roundtable: Food and Hunger in Vast Early America

Dams that powered grain mills but choked off fish migrations. Cassava bread that replaced wheat. A breakfast that turned into an ambush. The lenses of food and scarcity can transform our views of familiar places in early American history—Massachusetts,...
From: The Junto on 17 Jun 2019

Decoding British ciphers used in the South, 1780-81

During the southern campaigns the British used two kinds of cipher, each kind being markedly different from the other.  The First Kind of Cipher: The... The post Decoding British ciphers used in the South, 1780-81 appeared first on Journal of...

Q&A: Kate Egner Gruber, Curator of “Tenacity: Women in Jamestown and Early Virginia”

Today at The Junto, Philippe Halbert interviews Katherine Egner Gruber, who is Special Exhibition Curator at the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, a state agency that operates two living history museums in Virginia. This Q&A focuses on her most...
From: The Junto on 20 May 2019

The Chesapeake Headright System Increases Numbers of Indentured Servants

Both Virginia and Maryland employed the “headright” system to encourage the importation of the servant workers, that they so desperately needed. Under its terms, whoever paid the passage of a laborer received the right to acquire fifty acres...
From: 17th-century American Women on 6 Jun 2017

May 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Virginia Gazette [Purdie and Dixon] (May 4, 1769).“Best HARD SOAP at 6d. by the box.” In the spring of 1769, Freer Armston,, a chandler and soap boiler in Norfolk,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 May 2019

April 27

GUEST CURATOR: Samantha Surowiec What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Virginia Gazette [Rind] (April 27, 1769).“To be SOLD … before Mr. Anthony Hay’s door, in Williamsburg … TWENTY LIKELY...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 Apr 2019

The Mystery of “The Alternative of Williams-burg”

According to the Virginia Gazette between 400 and 500 merchants gathered in Williamsburg in early November 1774 and “voluntarily and generally signed” the Continental... The post The Mystery of “The Alternative of Williams-burg”...

April 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Virginia Gazette [Purdie and Dixon] (April 20, 1769).“[illegible]” Working extensively with primary sources is one of the benefits of serving as a guest curator...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Apr 2019

James McCubbin Lingan, an American Story

Of the thousands of men and women who contributed to the Patriot cause during the American Revolution, James McCubbin Lingan (1751–1812) stands out with... The post James McCubbin Lingan, an American Story appeared first on Journal of the American...

Captain Sepitmus Noel: Ordnance Fleet Commodore

History occasionally provides a pleasant surprise by revealing the record of an ordinary person who, thrust into a unique role, performed extraordinary services for... The post Captain Sepitmus Noel: Ordnance Fleet Commodore appeared first on Journal...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.