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Search Results for "Warwickshire"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Warwickshire found 23 posts

The Dugdale Society’s centenary

One hundred years ago this week, on 22 January 1920 to be exact, the Dugdale Society was formed with the aim of promoting the history of Warwickshire. Over the past century the Society has grown to be a significant force. It has now published fifty-two...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 24 Jan 2020

“This is the day!” Garrick’s Jubilee at 25

David Garrick 250 years ago today, on Weds 6 September 1769, David Garrick’s Shakespeare Jubilee began in Stratford-upon-Avon, the first Festival celebrating Shakespeare in the world. Even before it started there were many critics of the whole...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 6 Sep 2019

The Shakespeare Jubilee of 1769

Between the 6th and 8th of September 1769, the town of Stratford-upon-Avon held the first jubilee celebration commemorating the life of the great playwright, William Shakespeare. The event was organised by David Garrick, who was both an actor and the...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Sep 2017

ANSWERS

ANSWERS By Jillian Snyder Outside and in: St Swithun’s Church, Lower Quinton, Warwickshire. Outside and in: St Swithun’s Church, Lower Quinton, Warwickshire. Jillian Snyder is a Ph.D. student at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, and...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 19 Aug 2017

Mary Elizabeth Williams’ marriage to George Hammond Lucy of Charlecote Park, 1823

On 2nd December 1823, the young Mary Elizabeth Williams, fourth daughter of John Williams, Baronet of Bodelwyddan in north Wales, married George Hammond Lucy, the eligible new owner of the magnificent Charlecote Park in Warwickshire. Mary had been reluctant...
From: All Things Georgian on 27 Jun 2017

More female misers

We recently told you about the miser Mary Luhorne, that we came across in the book Lives and Anecdotes of Misers. Needless to say we unearthed a few more, but unfortunately, unlike Mary, we are unable to validate most of these, apart from to confirm that...
From: All Things Georgian on 21 Feb 2017

Guest author : Naomi Clifford – The Story of Rebecca Hodges

Today we return from our summer break and are delighted to welcome back to ‘All Things Georgian’ one of our previous guest authors, Naomi Clifford, author of the true life Regency mystery, The Disappearance of Maria Glenn. Naomi is presently researching...
From: All Things Georgian on 1 Sep 2016

Charlecote Park event, 7th September

Charlecote Park Wednesday, 7th September, 5.30-7.30 pm, Charlecote Park opens its doors to Shakespeare and hosts an evening with the playwright in Warwickshire. The house, completed by Thomas Lucy in 1558, the year Elizabeth I ascended the throne, was...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 19 Aug 2016

Ghostly evidence of murder

In our last blog we gave a tale of an eighteenth-century ghost who helped a girl find a hoard of buried coins beneath the stone flags on the floor of her cottage. Today we discuss another ghost who initially seemed equally as helpful, but this one was...
From: All Things Georgian on 29 Oct 2015

Shakespeare and the Book of Common Prayer

Archbishop Thomas Cranmer On Radio 4 on 26 August 2015 Quentin Letts asked “What’s the point of the Book of Common Prayer?” This little book, written by Archbishop Thomas Cranmer, was originally published in 1549 during the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 27 Aug 2015

Photos from the 2015 Symposium

Photographs taken at the Symposium on Saturday 16 May are now available online. Click on the image below to see the full gallery.
From: My-Parish.org on 28 May 2015

Christmas traditions: The Mummers’ Play

The Ilmington Mumming play at the Howard Arms Christmas Day itself may have passed, but today as in past centuries the Christmas season continues. In Shakespeare’s time the Christmas period was marked by more home-grown traditions including the burning...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 30 Dec 2014

Christmas under fire – extracts from Harry Fox’s war diary

Corporal Harry Fox describes a freezing December in 1914, serving with the Warwickshire Royal Horse Artillery in the First World War. This series of blogs supports a new exhibition at Hall’s Croft: ‘Cry Havoc! and let slip the dogs of war’...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 15 Dec 2014

Travelling to the Front – extracts from Harry Fox’s war diary

In his diary, Corporal Harry Fox of Stratford describes travelling to war in France with the Warwickshire Royal Horse Artillery. This series of blogs supports a new exhibition at Hall’s Croft: ‘Cry Havoc! and let slip the dogs of war’...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 11 Nov 2014

“Stratford-super-Avon”: Sir William Dugdale’s “Antiquities of Warwickshire”

Warwickshire is particularly fortunate to have Sir William Dugdale’s county history, Antiquities of Warwickshire, first published in one volume in 1656. The early seventeenth century was a time of increasing interest in local history studies, assisted...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 8 Oct 2014

Warwickshire farmers are faced with the ‘new woman’ in 1916

 With conscription beginning in 1916, a shortage of male workers meant Warwickshire farmers had to consider other options, including hiring women. This series of blogs supports a new exhibition at Hall’s Croft: ‘Cry Havoc! and let slip...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 2 Sep 2014

Going to War – extracts from Harry Fox’s diary

In his diary, Corporal Harry Fox describes the early days of the First World War, when soldiers were mobilising. This series of blogs supports a new exhibition at Hall’s Croft: ‘Cry Havoc! and let slip the dogs of war’ – The First...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 5 Aug 2014

Shakespeare’s World in 100 Objects: Number 94, an Empire in a book

Today’s post is by Alexandra Hewitt, who is studying for the MA in Renaissance, Reformation and Early Modern Studies at the University of Birmingham. A map of Warwickshire by John Speed, 1611 “They say he is already in the Forest of Arden, and a many...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 4 Mar 2014

Fact or fiction: Shakespeare at Charlecote

E W Haslehust’s painting of the gatehouse at Charlecote House There are many legends about Shakespeare’s life, but none is more compelling than that linking him with Charlecote Park, near Stratford-upon-Avon. Local historian Dr Robert Bearman...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 3 Mar 2014

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.