The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Welsh"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Welsh found 104 posts

A Satire on The Cameronian Tooth #History #Literature #Scotland

The following poem is a satire of the Cameronians, which was probably composed by Alexander Pennecuik shortly before his death in 1730. He was the nephew of Dr. Alexander Pennecuik who wrote about the Gypsies’ Field of Blood at Romanno. It vividly...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 2 Jun 2019

The Evans Brothers and the ‘Cardigan Cancer Cure’.

It’s the start of a new year, and the start of what I hope will be a sustained revival for my blog. 2018 was a bit of a busy year, one which saw me writing and researching for my project on the history of facial hair, busy with lots of fab and fun...
From: DrAlun on 3 Jan 2019

Act of Remembrance

This post is due to be published on 3 September 2018. (Apologies for the delay – there was a glitch in scheduling it.) On that date, I’ll actually be in France, and specifically at the Saint-Sever military cemetery, on the outskirts of...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 3 Sep 2018

We Have Impact

Apologies again for the ongoing blogging hiatus in recent weeks – I’m still working hard on finishing off the first book in my new Tudor naval trilogy, and have also been working on the book on naval ideology, 1500-1815, that I’m co-editing...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 23 Jul 2018

The Calm Before the Storm: Ayrshire in 1679 #History #Scotland

In the weeks before the Presbyterian Rising of 1679, Captain James Murray of His Majesty’s Regiment of Dragoons was busy in Ayrshire pursuing those suspected of assisting the field preacher, John Welsh, to evade capture. Murray was responding to...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 21 Jul 2018

Letters on 17th and 18th Century Welsh life to be digitised.

Three thousand rare letters written in the 17th and 18th centuries in Wales are to be digitised for people to read for generations to come.https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-north-west-wales-44779127http://emlo.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/home
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 11 Jul 2018

John Welsh’s Secret Meeting in Edinburgh in 1679 #History #Scotland

Alexander Hamilton of Kinkell was a intimate of John Welsh, the former minister of Irongray who was one of the main leaders of Presbyterian Rising in 1679. Kinkell was imprisoned between July, 1679, and the end of February, 1680, on suspicion of his role...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 27 Jun 2018

Slide Carrs & Drag Carts.

From some accounts the slide carr or drag cart was one of the earliest known forms of transport. These were certainly in use in Europe, Ireland, Scotland & Wales from roughly the 16th century to the early 20th century. These carts or carrs could be...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Apr 2018

“One Year of the Sea! There’s Only One Year of the Sea!”

A version of this post would have been my first of the year, and would have been published some weeks ago, had not more pressing matters intervened. *** So it’s 2018, the Wales Year of the Sea. Or so the marketing gurus who came up with the concept...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 19 Feb 2018

The Offpeak Day Return of the King

A bit of an oddity for this week’s second blog. (And anybody thinking ‘the blogger’s a bit of an oddity anyway’ is toast.) Last week’s trip to Galloway – see the previous post – provided me with lots of inspiration...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 30 Nov 2017

The Top Ten

I’m not tweeting very much at the moment, as I’m largely keeping my head down and working on my new Tudor project, but the other day, I had a bit of a brainwave, and tweeted a ‘top ten’ of the most popular posts ever (in terms...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 9 Oct 2017

Shakespeare’s Richard III: @RWCMD Cardiff

The Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama consistently provide thought-provoking and engaging stagings of Shakespeare’s plays – well worth going to check this out: Thursday 19 October – Saturday 28 October 7.15pm Matinee Wednesday 25...
From: Cardiff Shakespeare on 25 Sep 2017

James Skene’s Missing Martyrs’ Testimony of 1680 #History #Scotland

The martyrs’ testimony of James Skene is truly remarkable for the insight that it gives into the mind set of militant presbyterians at a moment of crisis for them in late 1680. At that time, key figures in the core of the network that was protecting...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 24 Jul 2017

Carmarthenshire Archives: the End of the Beginning?

Last Thursday, I attended a two-hour consultation meeting in Carmarthen on the proposed new record office for the county, following the closure of the previous one after the discovery of mould in the storerooms. Now, regular readers of this blog will...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 29 May 2017

Ancient Wreck

To Wales for the weekend for my ‘big birthday’ (clue: I won’t see my twenties again – or several other decades, either). While there, we went for a bracing walk along Cefn Sidan beach, one of the relatively lesser known treasures...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 3 Apr 2017

Finding Shakespeare Blog Round-up: March 2017

Take a look at the latest blog posts from the collections team at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Hapus! (1 Mar) Hamlet in Welsh The earliest translation that the SBT archives hold is the 1864 translation of Hamlet by D Griffiths;...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 1 Apr 2017

Carmarthenshire Archives (and more) Revisited

Regular readers will remember that, some eighteen months ago, this site built up quite a head of steam about the dire state of Carmarthenshire’s county archives. To cut a long story short, a serious outbreak of mould was discovered in the strongrooms,...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 13 Mar 2017

The Preaching Howe in Penninghame Parish, Galloway #History #Scotland

By Ring Knowes in Penninghame parish, Galloway, is the ‘Preaching Howe’, which may be were John Welsh field preached at Barnkirk in the late 1670s. William Kennedy in Barnkirk, who lived very close by, was a fugitive. According to the OS name...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 24 Jan 2017

Sick Servants in Early Modern Britain

Historians have done lots of work in recent years on health and medical care in the family in early modern Britain. As such we know much more about what life was like for the sick in the early modern home, how patients were cared for and by whom. The...
From: DrAlun on 11 Jan 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.