The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Widow"

Your search for posts with tags containing Widow found 18 posts

October 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “SARAH DAWSON, the Widow of JOSEPH DAWSON, Gardener.” Compared to their male counterparts, relatively few female entrepreneurs placed advertisements promoting their...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Oct 2020

September 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “To be sold one third Part cheaper than they can be purchased at any Place in Boston.” Abigail Davidson was one of several women in Boston who placed newspaper advertisements...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Sep 2020

The Widow Washington: The Life of Mary Washington

The Widow Washington: The Life of Mary Washington by Martha Saxton (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019) Historians who have studied Mary Ball Washington... The post The Widow Washington: The Life of Mary Washington appeared first on Journal...

The Colour of Mourning

I accidentally came across this trade card below, for a Matthias Otto of The Strand, London, and for those who are regular readers of All Things Georgian, you will no doubt be aware of my interest in trade cards, but something about this one specific...
From: All Things Georgian on 17 Jun 2020

February 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The Smith’s Shop is carried on … with the same Care and Dispatch as was in her Husband’s Lifetime.” When Thomas Williams, a blacksmith in Prince...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Feb 2020

July 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Newport Mercury (July 31, 1769). “The Shoe-making Business is still carried on at her Shop.” Elizabeth Mumford did not insert herself into the public prints until necessity...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Jul 2019

January 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (January 9, 1769). “The Business of Shoe-making is carried on as usual.” Mary Ogden likely never appeared in the public prints prior...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Jan 2019

Women, Power and Iron

This post comes from Niina Lehmusjärvi, MA, who is writing her PhD thesis in Cultural History in the University of Turku, Finland. She visited Centre for Gender History in the University of Glasgow in 2016. She… More

October 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Pennsylvania Gazette (October 1, 1767).“The mustard and chocolate business is carried on as usual.” Mary Crathorne, a widow, placed an advertisement in the Pennsylvania...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Oct 2017

Crowdfunding before the internet

A Victorian Workhouse (http://www.open.edu/) We think of crowdfunding as a modern phenomenon. When a family loses everything due to a fire in their home just before Christmas, thousands of people respond to an appeal by their friends on the internet,...
From: A Parcel of Ribbons on 25 Dec 2016

Day 3: Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World, 1400-18

Whilst looking for a suitable way to begin the chronicle of day 3 of our Domestic Devotions conference, a remark by Deborah Howard came to mind. During the roundup session, Deborah reminded the audience that our purpose was to mix up periods, geographical...
From: Domestic Devotions on 1 Sep 2015

Day 2: Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World, 1400-18

The primary goal of the conference, Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World, was to bring together friends and colleagues from around the world to discuss issues surrounding the practice of religion in the home in broad comparative perspectives....
From: Domestic Devotions on 1 Sep 2015

‘We must make haste, for when we home are come, We find again our work has just begun’

Today we welcome a fellow writer for Pen & Sword, the lovely Dr Sara Read, a lecturer in English at Loughborough University and a contributing editor for earlymodernmedicine.com. Sara has recently published a book entitled Maids, Wives,...
From: All Things Georgian on 4 Jun 2015

“it is truly distressing . . . to beg”

Wives who lose their soldier-husbands during a war are not usually considered casualties. But in a real sense they are and ought to be, especially during the American Revolution. American battle casualties in that war range from 4,435 to 6,824, some 90%...
From: In the Words of Women on 20 Nov 2014

A New Sort of Holyday for Husbands, or a warning to troublesome wives, 1733

Here is a particularly heartwarming (*cough*) report of one man’s enthusiastic embrace of widowhood in London in 1733. Yes folks, the ‘new holyday for husbands’ is to be enjoyed when your troublesome wife drops dead. Charming. (Although...
From: The History of Love on 3 Jul 2014

Trollope’s many widows: women in shades of black

Very first shot of Madame Max Goesler (Barbara Murray) (Pallisers 3:6) Dear friends and readers, On the list-serv, Victoria an interesting query: could people cite widows in Victorian novels and what were some attitudes towards them and/or their remarrying?...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 3 Feb 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.