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Search Results for "William Brown"

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Your search for posts with tags containing William Brown found 24 posts

Concord “fit for ENCAMPMENTS”

When Capt. William Brown and Ens. Henry DeBerniere first ventured out into the Massachusetts countryside in civilian clothes, from 23 February to 2 March 1775, their focus was Worcester. Gen. Thomas Gage’s spy on the provincial congress’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Apr 2021

The Ensign’s Map of a Road to Concord

In 2016, Ed Redmond of the Library of Congress’s Geography and Map Division shared an interesting discovery about an item in that collection.Redmond wrote: Several years ago, I stumbled across an unsigned manuscript map with the supplied title...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Apr 2021

Evacuation Day Lecture Now Online

I’ve put “The End of Tory Row,” my Evacuation Day talk for Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters, online at YouTube. Because this was an online talk, I loaded my PowerPoint up with more graphics. I hope those survive...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Mar 2021

Ten Patriot Soldier Gravesites

A previous article featured ten graves of Americans who served in the Revolutionary War, chosen primarily because of their elaborate monuments. Most of them... The post Ten Patriot Soldier Gravesites appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Getting Out of Marlborough in 1775

When we left Capt. William Brown and Ens. Henry DeBerniere, they were in a back room of Henry Barnes’s house in Marlborough, listening as he tried to send away a member of the local committee of correspondence.Dr. Samuel Curtis had shown up that...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jul 2020

“Safe no where but in his house”

On the evening of Tuesday, 28 Feb 1775, Henry Barnes opened the door of his large house in Marlborough (shown above, even larger after nineteenth-century expansion). Two strangers from England stepped inside. They apologized to Barnes “for taking...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jul 2020

“As we intended to go to Mr. Barns’s”

On Sunday, 26 Feb 1775, Capt. William Brown, Ens. Henry DeBerniere, and their bodyservant were in Worcester. They were all soldiers in the British army, but undercover in civilian dress. Because New England colonies had laws against traveling from town...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Jul 2020

“Count Brown” of King William County, Virginia

In 1767, William Burnet Brown moved out of Massachusetts. He sold his father’s country house on Folly Hill, “Browne Hall,” to his cousin William Browne, by then one of Salem’s representatives on the Massachusetts General Court....
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Oct 2019

William Burnet Brown, Skinny Legs and All

Like his first cousin William Browne, William Burnet Brown was a wealthy man and therefore rather well documented in eighteenth-century sources and nineteenth-century accounts.However, almost none of those accounts connect him to the fight between John...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Oct 2019

William Browne: Justice, Councilor, but Not Coffee-House Brawler

Technical difficulties—i.e., a power outage after a storm, and attendant recovery work—threw off my posting schedule this week. I hope to catch up over the next few days.The last posting quoted merchant captain Mungo Mackay describing William...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Oct 2019

More Maneuvering about the Manufactory

Boston 1775 readers might remember the conflict over the Manufactory House that occurred in October 1768, soon after the British regiments arrived in Boston. The soldiers’ “siege” of the building was surprisingly short, given all the...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jan 2019

Nithsdale Martyrs’ Monument: A Guide to the Covenanters #History #Scotland

Who are the 57 Covenanters listed on the Nithsdale Martyrs’ Cross in Dalgarnock graveyard? Where did they come from and what happened to them? The monument erected in 1928 lies in Dalgarnock graveyard between Thornhill and Closeburn, not far off...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 28 Oct 2018

The Curious Case of Zacheus Holmes

The United States pension and land bounty records furnish us with a multitude of fascinating stories. It is important, however, to weight them against... The post The Curious Case of Zacheus Holmes appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

A Visit to Marlborough, 28 Nov.

On Tuesday, 28 November, I’ll speak about The Road to Concord to the Marlborough Historical Society. The town of Marlborough pops up multiple times in the story that book tells, starting with how it reportedly sent both infantry and mounted militia...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Nov 2017

“Concord Secrets” at the Concord Museum, 31 July

On the evening of Monday, 31 July, I’ll speak at the Concord Museum on the topic of “Concord Secrets of 1775.”Here’s the event description:In the early spring of 1775, Concord was full of secrets. One prominent farmer was collecting...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jul 2017

“All the Seals have been taken out of the Council Chamber”

Hace you seen the last royal seal of Massachusetts?At left is a picture of the impression the seal made. It shows the royal arms of Great Britain, with the lion and unicorn fighting for a crown, within a motto denoting the reign of George III.As the Massachusetts...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Jul 2017

The Covenanters’ Prison, Edinburgh, 1679 #History #Scotland

After the Covenanters were defeated in the battle of Bothwell Brig on 22 June, 1679, at least 1,184 prisoners were delivered to Edinburgh. They were held in Inner Greyfriars’ Yard. What is today called The Covenanters’ Prison in Greyfriars’...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 5 Dec 2016

Open House at the Golden Ball Tavern, 10 Jan.

On Sunday, 10 January, the Golden Ball Tavern in Weston will hold the first in a series of “Second Sunday” Open Houses running each month through June. From 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. this Sunday, guides will lead tours of the site and answer questions...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jan 2016

Sorting Out the Versions of Crispus Attucks

This is a view from the Crispus Attucks Footbridge in Framingham, built near the area where he was reportedly born and worked for William Brown. And it looks like a good place to pause and reflect about how to reconcile the conflicting traditions about...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 May 2015

The Last Relics of Crispus Attucks

William Cooper Nell wasn’t the only Boston author researching the Boston Massacre in the nineteenth century. Another was Frederic Kidder, who published his History of the Boston Massacre in 1870. In one footnote he wrote: Crispus Attucks is described...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 May 2015

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