The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "William Brown"

Your search for posts with tags containing William Brown found 17 posts

“Count Brown” of King William County, Virginia

In 1767, William Burnet Brown moved out of Massachusetts. He sold his father’s country house on Folly Hill, “Browne Hall,” to his cousin William Browne, by then one of Salem’s representatives on the Massachusetts General Court....
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Oct 2019

William Burnet Brown, Skinny Legs and All

Like his first cousin William Browne, William Burnet Brown was a wealthy man and therefore rather well documented in eighteenth-century sources and nineteenth-century accounts.However, almost none of those accounts connect him to the fight between John...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Oct 2019

William Browne: Justice, Councilor, but Not Coffee-House Brawler

Technical difficulties—i.e., a power outage after a storm, and attendant recovery work—threw off my posting schedule this week. I hope to catch up over the next few days.The last posting quoted merchant captain Mungo Mackay describing William...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Oct 2019

More Maneuvering about the Manufactory

Boston 1775 readers might remember the conflict over the Manufactory House that occurred in October 1768, soon after the British regiments arrived in Boston. The soldiers’ “siege” of the building was surprisingly short, given all the...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jan 2019

Nithsdale Martyrs’ Monument: A Guide to the Covenanters #History #Scotland

Who are the 57 Covenanters listed on the Nithsdale Martyrs’ Cross in Dalgarnock graveyard? Where did they come from and what happened to them? The monument erected in 1928 lies in Dalgarnock graveyard between Thornhill and Closeburn, not far off...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 28 Oct 2018

The Curious Case of Zacheus Holmes

The United States pension and land bounty records furnish us with a multitude of fascinating stories. It is important, however, to weight them against... The post The Curious Case of Zacheus Holmes appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

A Visit to Marlborough, 28 Nov.

On Tuesday, 28 November, I’ll speak about The Road to Concord to the Marlborough Historical Society. The town of Marlborough pops up multiple times in the story that book tells, starting with how it reportedly sent both infantry and mounted militia...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Nov 2017

“Concord Secrets” at the Concord Museum, 31 July

On the evening of Monday, 31 July, I’ll speak at the Concord Museum on the topic of “Concord Secrets of 1775.”Here’s the event description:In the early spring of 1775, Concord was full of secrets. One prominent farmer was collecting...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jul 2017

“All the Seals have been taken out of the Council Chamber”

Hace you seen the last royal seal of Massachusetts?At left is a picture of the impression the seal made. It shows the royal arms of Great Britain, with the lion and unicorn fighting for a crown, within a motto denoting the reign of George III.As the Massachusetts...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Jul 2017

The Covenanters’ Prison, Edinburgh, 1679 #History #Scotland

After the Covenanters were defeated in the battle of Bothwell Brig on 22 June, 1679, at least 1,184 prisoners were delivered to Edinburgh. They were held in Inner Greyfriars’ Yard. What is today called The Covenanters’ Prison in Greyfriars’...
1679 Alexander Balfour (Gilston) Andrew Newbigging Andrew Sword (d.1679) Andrew Thomson (Sauchie) Andrew Wallace (Irongray) Ayrshire Balmaghie parish Borders Borgue parish Bowden parish British History Captain Strachan Ceres parish Covenanters Covenanters' Prison Cranston parish Croune of London (1679) David Cunningham David Somerville Drummond parish East Calder parish Edinburgh Edinburgh Tolbooth Edinburghshire Fife Galashiels parish Galloway George Heriot's School George Lord Ross His Majesty's Regiment of Dragoons History Inverkeithing parish Irongray parish James Balfour (Gilston) James Corsan (Kirkcudbright) James Gray James Lileburn (Kinross) James Waddell (Monklands) James Wood (d.1679) John Blackadder John Clyde (d.1679) John Govan John Kid (d.1679) John King (d.1679) John Kirk (Ceres) John McBraickney John Scott (Ettrick Forest) John Thomson (Bothwellmuir) John Waddel (d.1679) Kelso parish Kilmarnock parish Kincardine parish Kinross Kinross parish Kirkcudbright parish Kirkcudbrightshire Linlithgowshire Livingston parish Loudoun parish Militia Old Monkland parish Orwell parish Patrick Keir Patrick Wilson Perthshire Robert Boig (Newbigging) Robert Garnock Robert Kirk (Burleigh) Robert McGill (Galashiels) Robert Miller (Pinclo) Robert Russell Robert Young (Galasheils) Roxburgh Sandy Bells Scotland Scottish History Selkirkshire St Ninians parish Stirlingshire Stow parish Strathmiglo parish Thomas Brown (d.1679) Thomas Crichton Thomas Miller (Ceres) Thomas Pringle Thomas Williamson (Over Cranstoun) Walter McKechnie West Port Gate William Brown William Grindlay William Hardie William Henderson William Younger
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 5 Dec 2016

Open House at the Golden Ball Tavern, 10 Jan.

On Sunday, 10 January, the Golden Ball Tavern in Weston will hold the first in a series of “Second Sunday” Open Houses running each month through June. From 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. this Sunday, guides will lead tours of the site and answer questions...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jan 2016

Sorting Out the Versions of Crispus Attucks

This is a view from the Crispus Attucks Footbridge in Framingham, built near the area where he was reportedly born and worked for William Brown. And it looks like a good place to pause and reflect about how to reconcile the conflicting traditions about...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 May 2015

The Last Relics of Crispus Attucks

William Cooper Nell wasn’t the only Boston author researching the Boston Massacre in the nineteenth century. Another was Frederic Kidder, who published his History of the Boston Massacre in 1870. In one footnote he wrote: Crispus Attucks is described...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 May 2015

More Information about the Attucks Family

In 1860 the historian and activist William C. Nell addressed a crowd at the ninetieth anniversary of the Boston Massacre. That event took place in an auditorium called the Meionaon, part of the Tremont Temple. [Why don’t we have a Meionaon anymore?]As...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 May 2015

The Brown Family Memories of Crispus Attucks

As I quoted yesterday, in 1857 the descendants of William Brown of Framingham published a claim that he had been the owner of Crispus Attucks, victim of the Boston Massacre.They made that statement in a small book published to celebrate a wedding anniversary;...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 May 2015

The Crispus Attucks Teapot

Among the artifacts in the “We Are One” exhibit at the Boston Public Library is a teapot linked to Crispus Attucks, now owned by Historic New England. (And shown here thanks to a Harvard course on material culture.)I read about this teapot...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 May 2015

Out of History: The Martyrs of Covenanting Tradition.

Allan’s Cairn © Leslie Barrie and licensed for reuse. This is a list of Covenanters who were allegedly martyred in the Killing Times of 1685. Some of them still appear on lists of martyrs, even though they are only known from traditions that were recorded...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 6 Mar 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.