The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "William Jackson"

Your search for posts with tags containing William Jackson found 16 posts

Sufferers from the Great Boston Fire of 176

The scope of the Boston fire of 20 Mar 1760 really comes out in the list of victims that the newspapers published in the following week. The list was actually a guess, based on November 1759 property assessment records. The printers acknowledged that...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jan 2019

“A most terrible Fire” Starting at the Brazen Head

The 21 Mar 1760 Boston News-Letter reported two significant fires in Boston in the preceding week and then proceeded to this hastily composed yet lengthy report:Since the above Accounts were compos’d, for this Paper, a most terrible Fire happened...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Jan 2019

A Firmer for Molding Your Square Butts

The Jackson family of the Brazen Head advertised a lot of hardware that was unfamiliar to me—not that I do much metalworking or woodworking. I looked up a bunch of those terms while confirming my transcription and got curious about others. So here’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Jan 2019

The Brazen Head and a Bridge in Newbury

An item one could buy at the Sign of the Brazen Head in 1759, but which Mary Jackson didn’t list in her advertising, was a lottery ticket. We know that from an ad that appeared in the Boston Evening-Post on 30 April:The Drawing of Newbury Lottery(the...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Jan 2019

“To be sold by Wholesale and Retail, By James Jackson”

As I research Mary Jackson and her family, I must say it would be a lot easier if they weren’t named Jackson. And if they hadn’t kept choosing first names like James, William, and Mary. But of course they weren’t the only family in eighteenth-century...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jan 2019

A New Owner at the Brazen Head

By 1756, Mary Jackson had been running her shop at the Sign of the Brazen Head in central Boston for over twenty years.She had started as a suddenly widowed mother of two young children and for a few years had a male business partner, but then he died,...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jan 2019

“At the Brazen Head in Cornhill Boston”

One of the landmarks of pre-Revolutionary Boston was the Brazen Head—a carved head covered in bronze. It hung outside a shop near the center of town, right across from the Town House.Earlier this year I found that several histories say the Sign...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Dec 2018

Who Picked the Committees at the Constitutional Convention?

Through four months in the summer of 1787, passionate arguments over political principles filled the Pennsylvania State House while hard-nosed political horse-trading buzzed in... The post Who Picked the Committees at the Constitutional Convention? appeared...

April 1

GUEST CURATOR: Shannon Dewar What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette (April 10, 1767).“Wm Jackson at the Brazen Head.” Bang Bang: Bad Business in Boston! In reading this advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Apr 2017

March 19

GUEST CURATOR: Ceara Morse What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette (March 19, 1767).“To be sold by WILLIAM JACKSON, at his Shop at the Brazen Head.” This advertisement made me curious...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Mar 2017

Three Covenanters Banished to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, in 1685 #History #Scotland

Three of the prisoners tried for treason on 6 August, 1685, were banished on the ‘Henry & Francis’ to Perth Amboy, for the Scots’ Colony of East Jersey. 22 August, 1685: ‘I James Baird ane of the serjants to Collonell [James]...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 17 Nov 2016

Schoolboy Views of President Washington in 1789

When President George Washington finally reached Boston on 24 Oct 1789, he found that the town had planned a huge celebration for him. Huge.The young architect Charles Bulfinch had designed a triumphal arch, shown above. (For more about that structure,...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Jan 2015

Kimberly Alexander on Shoes in Lynn, 15 May

Alonzo Lewis’s 1829 History of Lynn says proudly:The principal business of Lynn is the manufacture of Ladies’ shoes. For the first hundred years from the settlement of the town, this business was very limited. Few persons followed it constantly, and...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 May 2014

Eighteenth Century Aphorisms

I like this quote from Gainsborough’s friend William Jackson of Exeter. Jackson (1730-1803) was the organist at Exeter Cathedral and late in life published a book called The Four Ages, which also included essays on various subjects, including one...
From: Kirby and his world on 11 Sep 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.