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Search Results for "William Molineux"

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Your search for posts with tags containing William Molineux found 34 posts

“A number of Soldiers with their Baggage landed”

On Monday, 12 Mar 1770, Bostonians assembled for a town meeting to elect officers for the coming year and transact other business.In fact, there was so much other business that that meeting kept going by adjournment for over two weeks, with sessions starting:Monday,...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Mar 2020

“The Committee reserve all the printed Copies”

On Monday, 26 Mar 1770, 250 years ago today, the inhabitants of Boston once again gathered in Faneuil Hall for a town meeting. Technically, this was a continuation of the meeting they had adjourned the week before.To discourage various sorts of bad behavior,...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Mar 2020

The Town Meeting and the “Carrier of the Dispatches”

On Thursday, 22 Mar 1770, 250 years ago today, Boston began a new town meeting. It had been only three days since the end of the last meeting, which had spread over several days as inhabitants chose men for town offices and discussed how to respond to...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Mar 2020

The Misdating of William Molineu

Among the many interesting documents on the Massachusetts Historical Society’s webpage about the Boston Massacre is a letter from William Molineux, the Boston activist, to Robert Treat Paine, a lawyer practicing in Taunton.It says:Boston March 9...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Mar 2020

The Troops’ Schedule for “embarkation for the castle”

One of the great things about the Sestercentennial of the Boston Massacre earlier this month is that I got to hear questions and new perspectives I could investigate. In the coming days I’ll go back over some of those points, starting with the question...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Mar 2020

“The flashes of two guns fired from the Custom-house”

Soon after Charles Bourgate reaffirmed his earlier story of being made to shoot down at the crowd during the Boston Massacre, the Boston Whigs (William Molineux in particular) got the young servant in front of a magistrate.This time that magistrate was...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Mar 2020

When Mr. Molineux Visited Charles Bourgate in Jail

When we left Charles Bourgate, 250 years ago, the young French servant was locked up in the Boston jail for “profane Swearing.”Charles had told shopkeeper Elizabeth Waldron that he and his master had shot guns out of the Customs House at the...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Mar 2020

Charles Bourgate’s Massacre

Today, 5 March, is the Sestercentennial anniversary of the Boston Massacre. I’ve written a lot about the Massacre over the years, including this post from 2007 about how the trouble started and how easily people could have avoided it.So today I’m...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Mar 2020

“My Eyes never beheld such a funeral”

Yesterday I described how the Boston Whigs prepared for young Christopher Seider’s funeral procession on Monday, 26 Feb 1770. The first newspaper published after that date was the 1 March Boston News-Letter, and it reported on the event this way:a...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Feb 2020

“A youth, son to Captain John Gore”

The older boy wounded by Ebenezer Richardson’s shot on 22 Feb 1770 was nineteen-year-old Samuel Gore.He appears here in his early-1750s portrait by John Singleton Copley, a detail from a painting now at Winterthur. Of course, this when Sammy was...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Feb 2020

“The first thought was to hang him up at once”

When Ebenezer Richardson fired his musket out of window of his house on 22 Feb 1770, as recounted yesterday, that gun was loaded with “Swan shot.” Those were lead pellets ”about the bigness of large peas”—larger than “Goose...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Feb 2020

“Boys insulting Every body who went in”

We don’t have inside information on the protests in front of the shops of people who defied Boston’s non-importation agreement in February 1770. Instead, we have the reports of an unfriendly observer reporting to a Customs official. That person...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Feb 2020

The Great 1770 Quiz Answers, Part 4

Here are answers to the final questions from the Great 1770 Quiz.X. Match the following men to their experience of tarring and feathering in 1770.1) John Adams2) Robert Auchmuty3) Henry Barnes 4) Theophilus Lillie 5) Patrick McMaster6) William Molineux...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Feb 2020

The Great 1770 Quiz Answers, Part 3

Here are answers from the start of the second part of the Great 1770 Quiz.VII. What were the real names of people in Boston behind these nicknames or pseudonyms used in 1770?A) DeterminatusB) The Irish Infant C) Michael Johnson D) PaoliE) PhilanthropF)...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Feb 2020

“Pointing to Mr. Jacksons Shop”

On Thursday, 8 Feb 1770, two and half centuries ago today, the Boston Whigs tried a new tactic in their pressure campaign against shopkeepers who were still selling imported goods. According to the anonymous witness sending reports to Customs Collector...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Feb 2020

Confrontation at Governor Hutchinson’s House

When we left the “Body of the Trade” in Faneuil Hall yesterday, Whig leader William Molineux had just threatened to storm out of the meeting and kill himself.Molineux wanted to lead the body to Thomas Hutchinson’s mansion in the North...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Jan 2020

William Molineux and “the legality of the proceedings”

On the morning of 18 Jan 1770, Boston’s Whigs thought that Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s sons, Thomas, Jr., and Elisha, had agreed to put their inventory of imported tea into the hands of the committee enforcing the non-importation boycott.That...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Jan 2020

“The whole Body consisting of about 1000 Men”

On 16 Jan 1770, the Boston Whigs circulated handbills for a new public meeting about non-importation. In Faneuil Hall, no less.The town’s merchants had launched the non-importation boycott back in 1768, as a response to the Townshend duties, and...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jan 2020

Non-Importation in the New Year

At the end of 1769, the Boston merchants’ non-importation agreement ran out. But the Townshend duties were still in effect, so the Whigs insisted on maintaining that boycott into the new year. That required leaning on people who wanted to resume...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jan 2020

“All possible exertions to stem the current of the mob”

Richard Clarke and Sons weren’t the only merchants tapped by the East India Company to import tea into Boston in 1773. The others were:Business partners Benjamin Faneuil, Jr. (1730-1787) and Joshua Winslow (1737-1775).Thomas Hutchinson, Jr. (1740-1811),...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Dec 2019

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