The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "William Pitt"

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Your search for posts with tags containing William Pitt found 49 posts

The East India Company and Parliament’s Fateful Decision of 1767

India, the fabled land of rubies, diamonds, gold, tigers, and mystery, captured the imagination of the British people in the mid 1700s. Robert Clive... The post The East India Company and Parliament’s Fateful Decision of 1767 appeared first on Journal...

Britannia’s support of the conspirators defeated

“The Prince of Wales …, sword in hand, gallantly protects Britannia against the attack of three conspirators: Pitt raises a headsman’s axe in both hands; Grafton, holding a conspirator’s lantern, is about to strike her with a...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 20 Mar 2019

A select collection of the most interesting letters on the government, liberty…

Title: A select collection of the most interesting letters on the government, liberty, and constitution of England : which have appeared in the different news-papers from the elevation of Lord Bute, to the death of the Earl of Egremont. With several...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Feb 2019

The political blind-buff man, or, The minist-l expediency

“Four men stand on the sea-shore, in back view but looking to the right: the King of Prussia stands between Holland (left) and Pitt (right); he holds Holland by the ear and kicks Pitt behind, saying, “This is the balance of Europe”....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 15 Jan 2019

English coronet auction by K-, P- & Co.

In a large room French aristocrats crowd across a table from Pitt who is taking money while handing a pen to the man opposite who holds a crown in his left arm as he throws coins toward Pitt’s grasping hand. Above Pitt stands George III behind podium,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 7 Dec 2018

The golden image that Nebuchadnezzar the king had set up

“A sequel to British Museum Satires no. 6438. George III, seated on a balloon, points downwards with his sceptre to an image of Pitt (right) as a naked child, on a column which is inscribed ‘Family Presumption’. The king looks down at...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 4 Dec 2018

The political warrior mowing down the Russian trade

“Pitt runs forward (left to right) to the waterside, a large sabre raised above his head, saying, “The Russian trade down the first”; he threatens a number of stranded ships with broken masts. The blade of his sabre is inscribed: ‘General...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 21 Nov 2018

Thoughts on the Powdered Wig

When we picture Europe or its North American colonies in the 1700s, we usually think of men in white wigs. Such men appear in most of the images we have from that period (which of course lean toward showing the upper class as they wanted to appear).What’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jul 2018

“The most infamous and reproachful Invectives”

Talking about “The Liberty Song” and its parodies, all from the second half of 1768, gets us a little ahead of the Sestercentennial. Here’s what happened in Boston 250 years ago today. Back on 21 Dec 1767, John Mein and John Fleeming...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jan 2018

The Boston Chronicle “unbiassed by prejudice or party”?

When in October 1767 John Mein and John Fleeming circulated the proposal to publish a new weekly newspaper in Boston, their plan started with a long list of things “their friends” wanted to see in it.That list concluded by quoting those advance...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Dec 2017

“Destroying all party distinctions”

As stated in a passage I quoted a couple of days ago, soon after Charles Townshend died, his post as Chancellor of the Exchequer was offered to Lord North, who accepted it on 11 September. That quick succession made the British government of the time...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Sep 2017

“All those parts and fire are extinguished”

On 24 Aug 1767, the British politician Thomas Whatley wrote to former boss George Grenville about gossip he’d heard from yet another Member of Parliament, Grey Cooper:He told me that the Chancellor of the Exchequer [Charles Townshend, shown here]...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Sep 2017

A Rifleman in New York

When we left Sgt. Henry Bedinger in mid-March 1776 yesterday, he and his company of Virginia riflemen had been ordered to march from Boston to New York.He continued his diary, preserving information about how many miles the riflemen could cover in an...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Mar 2017

Caught out, or why expense fiddling is not a modern phenomenon

We are thrilled to welcome Dr Jacqueline Reiter who has written a guest blog for us about her first book The Late Lord: the life of John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham, which was published by Pen & Sword Books in January 2017. Jacqueline has a PhD...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Feb 2017

The First Snowman

This picture was published at the end of a chapter in the first volume of A History of British Birds, published in 1797 by the English engraver Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Bob Eckstein’s History of the Snowman says this was the first depiction of...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Feb 2017

September 3

GUEST CURATOR: Nicholas Commesso What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago today? Occasional Supplement to W. Weyman’s Gazette of Yesterday [New-York Gazette] (September 30, 1766).“LINENS and SHEETINGS, … Russia Iron,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Sep 2016

Arming John Bull to fight the buggoboos!!!

John Bull, a much overburdened soldier, looks up in angry dismay at a helmet inscribed ‘Glory’ which Pitt (left) is about to place on his head. He says, “O D—-n the Glory I shall never be able to bear it all!” Pitt stands...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 16 Sep 2016

The Flushing phantasmagoria, or, Kings conjurors amusing John Bull

“A ‘conjuror’ or magician displays to John Bull on a screen four scenes, one below the other, representing the expedition to Flushing. He wears a conical hat with a wide fur brim, and his magician’s robe resembles that of the Chancellor...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Sep 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.