The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Wine"

Showing 1 - 20 of 114

Your search for posts with tags containing Wine found 114 posts

Tartar Salt

So-called "wine diamonds," (harmless)Potassium bitartrate deposits which can accumulatein bottles and barrels of wineTartar salt is an example of an alchemist's chemical that is a byproduct of another process, in this case winemaking. In his...
From: Conciatore on 22 Apr 2020

Aggressive-Minded Gamblers: Washington, Howe, and the Days Between Battles, September 12–16, 1777

On Tuesday afternoon, September 16, 1777—five days after the Battle of Brandywine—George Washington and most of his 11,000-member Continental army stood atop the South... The post Aggressive-Minded Gamblers: Washington, Howe, and the Days...

The Legends of Sandy Flash Drive

The Philadelphia Inquirer just published an article about how two roads in the region—in areas where I’ve traveled, in fact—are named after a Revolutionary turncoat and highwayman. This circumstance raises interesting questions about...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Jan 2020

Tartar Salt

So-called "wine diamonds," (harmless)Potassium bitartrate deposits which can accumulatein bottles and barrels of wineTartar salt is an example of an alchemist's chemical that is a byproduct of another process, in this case winemaking. In his...
From: Conciatore on 11 Dec 2019

Of Astrolabes and Wine

Further evidence that astrolabes are infiltrating culture is the name of winery in New Zealand: Astrolabe. A winery in New Zealand has adopted the name “Astrolabe.” Unfortunately, this winery is not really named after the instrument. Instead,...
From: Darin Hayton on 15 Oct 2019

Rosichiero Glass

Sunset over Venice(click image to enlarge)The most famous glass recipe in Antonio Neri’s 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, is “#129 Transparent Red.” The reason for its notoriety is, of course, the pure gold used as a pigment. Gold-ruby,...
From: Conciatore on 26 Aug 2019

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of...
From: Conciatore on 21 Aug 2019

Benedict Arnold and James Wemyss: Similar Experiences Contrasting Legacies

Often, a person’s legacy is defined by decisions made at pivotal moments rather than a lifetime of previous accomplishments. The is especially true for... The post Benedict Arnold and James Wemyss: Similar Experiences Contrasting Legacies appeared...

The Use of Sealing Wax to Seal the Tops of Corked Wine Bottles in the 17th & 18th Centuries.

The Use of Sealing Wax to Seal the Tops of Corked Wine Bottles in the 17th& 18th Centuries.An early example, a wine bottle dating to 1727, is reported to have the cork covered with wax and cloth and held down by a string attached under the string...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 1 Jun 2019

17th Century Wine found in a Shipwreck.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/a27632499/17th-century-wine-discovered/; Interesting seals on the above 17th century wine bottles, my 18th century karaf came with the same type of seal.
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 31 May 2019

Operations of the Queen’s Rangers: Foraging in New Jersey, February–March 1778

“Of the forty or more battalions of Loyalists, which enlisted in the service of the Crown during the Revolutionary war, none has been so... The post Operations of the Queen’s Rangers: Foraging in New Jersey, February–March 1778 appeared...

Brandywine Weekend

I am just back from a long weekend spent in the Brandywine Valley spanning the border of Pennsylvania and Delaware. A few friends and I drove down principally to visit Winterthur, but I think we were blindsided by all the attractions of this beautiful...
From: streets of salem on 30 Apr 2019

Tartar Salt

So-called "wine diamonds," (harmless)Potassium bitartrate deposits which can accumulatein bottles and barrels of wineTartar salt is an example of an alchemist's chemical that is a byproduct of another process, in this case winemaking. In his...
From: Conciatore on 24 Apr 2019

This Week on Dispatches: Matthew Moss on the Ferguson Breech-Loading Rifle

In this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews British historian Matthew Moss and the story of Major Patrick Ferguson and the first breech-loading rifle adopted... The post This Week on Dispatches: Matthew Moss on the Ferguson Breech-Loading...

March 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette (March 30, 1769). “WINE To be Sold by ROSANNA MOORE.” On many occasions Rosanna Moore would have been the only female entrepreneur advertising...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Mar 2019

Protecting the Sabbath!!!, or, Coersion for England

A satire on the puritanical message of strictly observing the Sabbath. A puritan stands on a barrel marked ‘St. Andrew’, his arms held out making a cross. He cries: ‘Clear the Streets of all Evil doers – Remember ye keep Severely...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 13 Mar 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.