The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Women"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Women found 2253 posts

“Like a Collapsible Concertina”: Cosmetic Interventions in Fin-de-Siècle London

Jess Clark In the Fall of 2020, new reports revealed a marked increased in cosmetic procedures—surgery, injectables, and other dermatological treatments—over the course of the COVID pandemic. During the global crisis, some men and women of means have...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Sep 2021

10 Amazing Women of the Revolutionary War

 “I desire you would remember the ladies” -March 31, 1776, Abigail Adams to her husband, John Adams After reading the “Most Overrated Revolutionary” and the “Most Underrated Revolutionary,” and the amazing contributions by...

Regency “Privy” Matters: Feminine Hygiene, Bodily Functions, and Childbirth

After my previous article on Regency Women: Beauty Behind the Scenes, I realized that the things I really want to know more about concerning Jane Austen’s Regency women aren’t (and weren’t) discussed as much as other topics such as beauty regimes....
From: Jane Austen's World on 2 Sep 2021

Seventeenth-century Waistcoats for Women: Jacobean Fashions

Seventeenth-century Waistcoats for Women: An Evolution of Everyday Style The waistcoat is by far one of the most common pieces of clothing I have come across in the records of seventeenth-century women. While women did wear gowns – that is a coordinating...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 1 Sep 2021

Mushroom Summer

The combination of my absence and the tropical weather has turned my garden into a wild jungle: I tried to tame it the other day but succeeded merely in clearing out all the mushrooms. I’ve never seen so many in my small patch, and pretty much everywhere...
From: streets of salem on 30 Aug 2021

Mary Hockmore’s Lawyer: Marriage Breakdown and Women’s Rights in 17th Century England

Guest post by Tim Stretton, 14 August 2021. For centuries the English common law rules concerning married women’s rights—known by the shorthand ‘coverture’—restricted a wife’s ability to control real estate, own movable property, enter...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 14 Aug 2021

Canadian Women, War, and Wheat Bread

By Sarah Cavanagh While rustic sourdoughs and fancy homemade bagels have filled Canadian kitchens during the pandemic, another way to pass the time (and give even the dodgiest sourdough boule a respectable look and taste by comparison) is to recreate...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Jul 2021

Renaissance Refresh in Worcester

This past Wednesday was my stepson’s 20th birthday and lo and behold, instead of all the outdoorsy things we have done on birthdays past he wanted to go see the collection of armor and arms at the Worcester Art Museum, which absorbed the John Woodman...
From: streets of salem on 9 Jul 2021

One of Many Ways for Macanese Aluar

By Mukta Das Aluar de Anita Lei Tao 1 cate de farinha ½ cates de assucar pedra 6 taels de farinha pulu 3 cates de amendoas 5 cates de pinhao ½ cates de manteiga 3 cocos (metade para santem)[i] – Albertina Borges, M d C., Receitas culinárias macaenses,...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Jul 2021

Book Review: Running from Bondage: Enslaved Women and Their Remarkable Fight for Freedom in Revolutionary America

Running From Bondage: Enslaved Women and Their Remarkable Fight For Freedom In Revolutionary America by Karen Cook Bell (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2021) A... The post Book Review: Running from Bondage: Enslaved Women and Their Remarkable...

“My Daughter, which she really is, tho’ but an adopted one”

This story came up (in my head at least) during yesterday’s online presentation from King’s Chapel about how the Revolution affected members of that Anglican congregation. I realized I hadn’t shared it here before. The minister of that church was...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Jul 2021

The Mystery of “Our Old Friend”

Among the toasts at the Royal Welch Fusilier officers’ dinner on 1 Mar 1775 that I described back here was: “Our old friend.”Most of the toasts that day were to people or historical events. Though the allusions could be stark (“Plume of Feathers....
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jun 2021

Joanna Southcott (1750-1814), religious prophetess

Joanna was born in 1750 and presented for baptism at the local parish church, Ottery St Mary, Devon, by parents William and Hannah on 6th June 1750. If you look to the left of the entry in the baptismal register, you’ll see a faint, handwritten notation...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 Jun 2021

Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society

Please enjoy the recording of our second in the series of Table Talks, featuring children’s literature, labouring-class poetry, feminist polemic, creative life writing, Romantic poetry, and silver fork fiction: Thanks to Felicity James, Adam...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 21 Jun 2021

Mary Collyer and Salomon Gessner, The Death of Abel (1776)

By Dylan Lewis Fig. 1. Margaret Anne Dewes’s Her Book inscription in Mary Collyer and Salomon Gessner, The death of Abel. In five books. Attempted from the German of Mr. Gessner, 11th ed. (London, 1776). Eighteenth-Century Collections Online, link.gale.com/apps/doc/CW0111720250/ECCO?u=umd_um&sid=ECCO&xid=e6faa859....

Evening, or, The man of feeling

Three men sit by a supper-table, a grandfather-clock behind them points to XI. The man on the left is having his jack-boots pulled off by a small boy; the boy stands astride his right leg pulling hard, his back to the man, who is scowling and pushes his...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 11 Jun 2021

The Later Career of Henry DeBerniere

On 18–19 Apr 1775, Ens. Henry DeBerniere was in the column of British troops that marched to Concord and back. Having visited the town looking for cannon the month before, he was probably one of the main guides for his regimental commander, Lt. Col....
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jun 2021

Lady Godiva and Peeping Tom

It has largely been accepted that the story of Lady Godiva riding through the streets of Coventry was a myth. The legend dates back to around the 13th century when she was reputed to have ridden around Coventry naked, with just her long blonde hair covering...
From: All Things Georgian on 9 Jun 2021

“Stories of women hatching financial plans”

Sara T. Damiano, author of the new book To Her Credit: Women, Finance, and the Law in Eighteenth-Century New England Cities, shared some reflections on her research on the Johns Hopkins University Press blog: In places like colonial Boston, MA and Newport,...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jun 2021

Roman History and Modern Society

Ancient Roman history is alive and well, and newsworthy. An interview with Mary Beard, Professor of Classics at the University of Cambridge, in The New York Times highlights diverse ways in which Roman history is actively used in today’s society...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.