The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Women's History"

Showing 1 - 20 of 281

Your search for posts with tags containing Women's History found 281 posts

Mushroom Summer

The combination of my absence and the tropical weather has turned my garden into a wild jungle: I tried to tame it the other day but succeeded merely in clearing out all the mushrooms. I’ve never seen so many in my small patch, and pretty much everywhere...
From: streets of salem on 30 Aug 2021

Renaissance Refresh in Worcester

This past Wednesday was my stepson’s 20th birthday and lo and behold, instead of all the outdoorsy things we have done on birthdays past he wanted to go see the collection of armor and arms at the Worcester Art Museum, which absorbed the John Woodman...
From: streets of salem on 9 Jul 2021

Joanna Southcott (1750-1814), religious prophetess

Joanna was born in 1750 and presented for baptism at the local parish church, Ottery St Mary, Devon, by parents William and Hannah on 6th June 1750. If you look to the left of the entry in the baptismal register, you’ll see a faint, handwritten notation...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 Jun 2021

The Pious Mary Anne Deane (1718-1807)

Mary  Anne Deane was born about 1718 and was believed to be the daughter of John Deane, Governor of India, who died about 1752. Sadly, it’s proving difficult to find anything about this lady’s early life. Teapot with Lid and Cup Inscribed with the...
From: All Things Georgian on 26 May 2021

Sullivan, “Infanticide & Reproductive Agency in Reformation Spain,” WHR Oct

Nazanin Sullivan, “‘Performing Public Piety:’ Infanticide and Reproducitve Agency in Reformation Spain,” Women’s History Review, October 2020.
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 20 May 2021

Mary Edwards a single minded woman (1705-1743)

On 12 July 1704, at Christ Church, Newgate Street, London, Francis Edwards married Anna Margaretta Vernatti and almost nine months to the day their daughter, Mary was born.  On 25 May 1705, Francis and Anna presented their daughter, Mary to be baptised...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 May 2021

Gendered Violence in Colonial Latin America, JWH, Summer 2019

The Journal of Women’s History put out a special issue on “Colonial Intimacies and Gendered Violence,” 31/2, Summer 2019, and it featured two articles on colonial Latin America: Tamara J. Walker, “‘That Is How Whores Get...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 28 Apr 2021

Campbell, “Transatlantic Histories of Iberian Women,” JWH, Fall 2018

Jodi Campbell, “Transatlantic Histories of Iberian Women and Families,” Journal of Women’s History 30/3 (2018). Reviews Jane E. Mangan, Transatlantic Obligations, Allyson M. Poska, Gendered Crossings, and Sarah E. Owens and Jane E....
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 27 Apr 2021

The Friends of Lydiard Park

The Good Gentlewoman blog has found a new (and very fitting) home on the Friends of Lydiard Park website. The Friends of Lydiard Park is a charitable organisation, which supports and promotes interest in Lydiard House, its beautiful grounds and the St....
From: Good Gentlewoman on 23 Apr 2021

The Ladies of Lydiard

This week I am thrilled to announce the publication of my book The Ladies of Lydiard, which has been my work in progress for several years. The St. John family who owned Lydiard House and Park for more than 500 years were an extraordinary family. Related...
From: Good Gentlewoman on 31 Mar 2021

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu – a ‘bad mother’

I am delighted to welcome fellow author,  the lovely Jo Willet, to tell us about her book ‘The Pioneering Life of Mary Wortley Montagu: Scientist and Feminist‘ which has just been published by Pen and Sword Books. Jo has been an award-winning...
From: All Things Georgian on 31 Mar 2021

Tibby Tinkler, bookseller of Richmond, Yorkshire

What an amazing aquatint of a woman I would love to have met. It was produced after her death, but it’s full of such character, but who was she?  Her name was of Isabella, known to all as Tibby Tinkler. Isabella Tinkler bookseller Richmond...
From: All Things Georgian on 17 Mar 2021

Lady Elizabeth Mary Murray

To date, along with guest writers, I have written quite a few articles about Dido Elizabeth Belle, but suddenly realised that I have largely ignored the co-sitter in the famous portrait, her cousin, Lady Elizabeth Mary Murray, so it’s time to rectify...
From: All Things Georgian on 10 Mar 2021

The portrait of Lady Brisco (1755-1822) by Gainsborough

This portrait caught my eye recently whilst looking at portraits by Gainsborough and I was curious to know a little more about her, especially as she was sporting the high hair fashion of the day. Gainsborough, Thomas; Lady Brisco; English Heritage, Kenwood...
From: All Things Georgian on 3 Mar 2021

A Hosier near Hungerford Market: Ann Hodgson and her Partnership in Trade

On 15 October 1718, Ann Hodgson ‘next the one Ton Tavern near Hungerford Market in the Strand’ took out an insurance policy for her goods and merchandise as a hosier.[1] No specific value for her stock was recorded but Sun Fire Office insurance...
From: A Fashionable Business on 1 Mar 2021

Bold Bling, Romantic Posies and Star-Set Jewels, Georgian Jewellery That Would Even Make Even the Cast of Bridgerton Jealous!

Today I’m thrilled to welcome a new guest to All Things Georgian,  Molly Chatterton of Lillicoco, antique and vintage jewellers, to talk about a subject close to my heart – 18th century jewellery, so without any further ado I’ll...
From: All Things Georgian on 17 Feb 2021

The Early Modern Precariat: Women in the Precarious Household Middling

*Trigger Warning: mentions of coercive control and financial abuse* Women in early modern England occupied positions across the “middling” scale.  There was no singular “female experience” in this period, but a rich and varied...
From: Middling Culture on 8 Feb 2021

The Persistent Legend of Princess Elizabeth (1770-1840) and the mysterious George Ramus

Well, this certainly was not a proverbial rabbit hole I expected to find myself down when this beautiful portrait caught my eye. I simply wanted to know more about the young lady whose beauty had been captured by George Romney. The portrait is of ‘Elizabeth...
From: All Things Georgian on 3 Feb 2021

Caroline Remond Putnam

Faithful readers of this blog will know that I am captivated by the Remonds, an African-American family of ten who lead exemplary lives of advocacy, activism and entrepreneurialism in Salem in the nineteenth-century, often centered around Hamilton Hall,...
From: streets of salem on 26 Dec 2020

The Disposition of a Directress

Well I have to admit that I’m feeling pleased with myself this week as I have finished a challenging on-line semester of four courses while writing a book, my blog has reached its 10th anniversary, and I’m wrapping up my #SalemSuffrage Saturdays!...
From: streets of salem on 19 Dec 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.