The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Women in Business"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Women in Business found 41 posts

February 27

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “HANNAH COLEMAN, … late apprentice to Mrs. Wish.” Hannah Coleman made mantuas.  These loose gowns worn by women first came into popularity in the late seventeenth...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 Feb 2020

18C American Women in Business - Women & Coffee Houses in Early Boston

Coffee had been popular in Boston for over a century, when the Revolutionary women of the town became patriotically incensed. Many women owned coffee houses, which traditionally had been frequented by men. Dorothy Jones had been issued a license to sell...
From: 18th-century American Women on 2 Feb 2019

January 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (January 9, 1769). “The Business of Shoe-making is carried on as usual.” Mary Ogden likely never appeared in the public prints prior...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Jan 2019

Betty Washington (Mrs Fielding Lewis) 1733-1797 George Washington's Sister & The Revolution

Rebecca A. Johnson, “Betty Washington Lewis,” The Digital Encyclopedia of George Washington,  Betty Washington Fielding Lewis 1733-1797Betty Washington Lewis was more than just the only sister of George Washington to survive to adulthood;...
From: 18th-century American Women on 6 Jun 2017

Deborah Read (1708–1774) the resourceful but unhappy wife of Ben Franklin

Deborah Read Franklin (1708–1774)Deborah Read Franklin (c. 1708-1774)  was born to John & Sarah Read, a well respected Quaker couple. John Read was a moderately prosperous building contractor & carpenter who died in 1724. Read had three...
From: 18th-century American Women on 1 Dec 2018

Another look at Mary Katharine Goddard, the Woman who Signed the Declaration of Independence

Mary Katharine Goddard (1738-1816), likely the United States’ first woman employee, this newspaper publisher was a key figure in promoting the ideas that fomented the RevolutionAn illustration of Mary Goddard (Brown Library)By Erick TrickeyNovember...
From: 18th-century American Women on 5 Nov 2018

18C Delicate Women in the Almshouse

A Woman Shopkeeper of the 1790s, by an Unknown Artist.A 1751 petition to Philadelphia's Overseers of the Poor conveyed the request of Mary Marrot and her daughter for more refined fare in the almshouse. Although they appreciated the plentiful...
From: 18th-century American Women on 10 Mar 2018

18C Women in Business - Commerce & Character

A Woman Shopkeeper of the 1790s, by an Unknown Artist.Earlier in the century, trade was often characterized in moral rather than political terms. Benjamin Franklin's fabricated letters to the editor on the behavior of a lying and cheating shopkeeper,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 6 Mar 2018

18C Women in Business in Nantucket

A Woman Shopkeeper of the 1790s, by an Unknown Artist.Descnbing the customs of eighteenth-century Nantucket, Hector St John de Crevecoeur praised the industnousness of the wives of the town, who, compelled by their seafanng husbands' long absences, were...
From: 18th-century American Women on 2 Mar 2018

18C Women in Business - Train in Accounting & Business

A Woman Shopkeeper of the 1790s, by an Unknown Artist.Author Daniel Defoe 1660-1731 argued for the necessity of women being trained in accounting and business skills, such training provided economic benefits to the family, particularly preservation...
From: 18th-century American Women on 26 Feb 2018

18C Women in Business - Leave Their Business to Daughters

A Woman Shopkeeper of the 1790s, by an Unknown Artist.Boston retailer Hannah Newman, who ran a shop with her daughter Susannah, bequeathed only paltry sums to her two sons In her will, Newman elaborated on the qualities her daughter possessed that earned...
From: 18th-century American Women on 22 Feb 2018

18C Women in Business - Wives of Mariners

A Woman Shopkeeper of the 1790s, by an Unknown Artist.A 1718 Pennsylvania law ordered that the wives of men who went to sea should be considered independent traders with legal rights in court. It was designed to protect women from unscrupulous and absent...
From: 18th-century American Women on 18 Feb 2018

18C Women in Business - Tavern Owner

A Woman Shopkeeper of the 1790s, by an Unknown Artist.In New York seven women retailers held tavern licenses for at least one year dunng the period 1757-65, Tavern Keeper's License Book, 1757-1766, New York City, Mayor's Office,New-York Historical...
From: 18th-century American Women on 14 Feb 2018

18C Women in Business - The Feme Sole Trader

A Woman Shopkeeper of the 1790s, by an Unknown Artist.Feme sole traders were married women who avoided coverture, a series of legal restrictions that usually accompanied marriage. According to historian Linda Kerber, "Feme sole status was ... a legal...
From: 18th-century American Women on 10 Feb 2018

18C Women in Business - Women Banking in Early America

 A Woman Shopkeeper of the 1790s, by an Unknown Artist.Sometime on July 9, 1797, Hannah Holland strode into her bank to get a loan. She learned the next day that her application had been successful but the news barely affected her busy day. The businesswoman...
From: 18th-century American Women on 6 Feb 2018

18C Women in Business - Historiography of Women's Economic Roles in Early America

A Woman Shopkeeper of the 1790s, by an Unknown Artist.Everything indicates that, should need arise, there was nothing in the social or economic code of the times to prevent a woman's supporting herself and her family in whatever way she best could. ......
From: 18th-century American Women on 2 Feb 2018

New York Business Woman Mary Alexander 1693-176

The Alexander Papers at the New-York Historical Society Library contain the records of the mercantile business of Mary Alexander and provide a glimpse into the life of a colonial NYC businesswomanFrom the New-York Historical Society LibraryMary Alexander’s...
From: 18th-century American Women on 17 Nov 2017

Female Apprentices in 18C Colonial America

Apprentice Female Tinsmith? Detail Ferblantier (Tin Plate Maker) Encycopedia of Diederot & d'Alembert 1765 Traveling through the English countryside in 1741, William Hutton happened upon a blacksmith's shop, where he saw "one or more females, stripped...
From: 18th-century American Women on 14 Nov 2017

18C Women Owning Millinery Shops

In the 1500s & 1600s, the millinery business involved shopkeepers who dealt in milanese (as in Milan, Italy) ware, like silks, ribbons, armor, swords & other Italian goods. Millinery, however, began to change its meaning as swords & armor...
From: 18th-century American Women on 11 Nov 2017

Colonial Women participate in Consumer Boycotts during the American Revolution

During the American Revolution, many women joined protests and boycotts of imported British goods voluntarily, while others succumbed to pressure from patriots.  The colonists first used nonimportation to protest the Sugar Act in 1764, and they turned...
From: 18th-century American Women on 5 Nov 2017

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.