The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Women in History"

Your search for posts with tags containing Women in History found 10 posts

Gin – definitely ‘mother’s ruin’ as far as Judith Defour was concerned.

Detail from Newton’s Samples of Sweethearts and Wives, via Lewis Walpole Library We all know about the eighteenth century gin craze: how men and women of ‘the lower orders’  got completely rat-arsed. As Hogarth put in his print...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 6 Dec 2020

Re-visiting Maria Cosway

Fake Or Fortune? Philip Mould and Fiona Bruce with the painting ‘Peniston Lamb II’, originally valued at £8,000 (Photo: Ben Fitzpatrick/BBC/PA Wire)   Last night the BBC aired the latest episode of ‘Fake or Fortune?’,...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 2 Aug 2019

Curl up with our two biographies: 30% off RRP for a limited time when bought together

As the nights start to draw in, it’s a perfect time to curl up in the warmth by your fireside with a book or two and so we’re delighted that our publisher, Pen & Sword, have chosen to offer both our current biographies as a discounted...
From: All Things Georgian on 19 Oct 2017

Amazing Grace Dalrymple Elliott: courtesan and spy

We are delighted to be featured on the fabulous Amazing Women in History website, with an article about Grace Dalrymple Elliott. We think that Grace certainly qualifies as an ‘amazing woman’ and we very much hope that you do too. Grace was...
From: All Things Georgian on 13 Sep 2016

Strangers in the House (of Commons, that is).

It is some years since I applied to my Member of Parliament for a ticket to enable me to sit in the Strangers Gallery (now known as the Visitors Gallery) to watch a debate in the House of Commons. I gather that  you can in fact still turn up without...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 10 Jun 2016

Saartjie Baartman – a reminder of a tragic life – and death – two hundred years ago today.

On 29 December 1815 a sad young girl died in Paris, thousands of miles from her South African homeland. She was just 25 years old, and her brief life speaks volumes about contemporary European attitudes towards race and ethnicity. Even in death she was...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 29 Dec 2015

Remembering Phoebe Hessel (1713 – 1821) – a long and varied life.

Thumbing through back numbers of the Gentleman’s Magazine as one does, (preferably online via the Hathi Trust Digital Library  here ) I came across the ever-readable section for 1821 entitled “Obituaries, with Anecdotes of Remarkable...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 21 Dec 2015

Elizabeth Chudleigh, bigamist, duchess, countess and exhibitionist.

The trial of the Duchess of Kingston (born Elizabeth Chudleigh in 1721) for the crime of bigamy was one of the sensations of the Georgian Age. The Press devoted endless column inches to the trial and its aftermath – to the lower orders it confirmed...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 17 Nov 2015

Hester Bateman – an extraordinary woman: a brilliant silversmith, clever in business.

This post owes everything to the information given to me by the award-winning author Lynne Connolly. As ‘Lynne Connolly’ she writes historical romance, and as ‘L.M. Connolly’ spicy contemporary and paranormal romance. From my point...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 1 Nov 2015

Nigella or Hannah – take your pick!

On the left, Nigella Lawson, she of the lip-smacking, finger-licking cookery programmes; and on the right, an Eighteenth Century kitchen heroine called Hannah who, it has to be said on the evidence of this picture, was never likely to get the male pulse...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 2 Aug 2013