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Search Results for "Writing"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Writing found 1002 posts

Programme: Hakluyt Society Symposium 2021 – Decolonising Travel Studies: Sources and Approaches

10-12 November 2021University of Warwick (online via Zoom) Programme (pdf) (All times are GMT+0/UTC) The Hakluyt Society, the Global History and Culture Centre (GHCC) at the University of Warwick, and Medieval and Early Modern Orients (MEMOs),...
From: Richard who? on 13 Sep 2021

On daily writing

 In her essay "On Keeping a Notebook," Joan Didion explains that "I think we are well advised to keep on nodding terms with the people we used to be whether we find them attractive company or not." She later suggests -- of knowing her past selves through...
From: The Seacoast of Bohemia on 6 Sep 2021

Gathering Rosebuds

I’ve decided to practice what I teach (<–nope, not a typo). When I teach writing, I harp endlessly on the need to write often, to keep the muscle memory of writing flexed and supple. It’s like playing an instrument, I say, or practicing a...
From: Out of Time on 31 Aug 2021

Biography, Reclaimed: Looking Back at the Abbé Grégoire and the French Revolution

By Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall The history of the world is but the biography of great men. –Thomas Carlyle (1841) The biographies of the great men of the past… are generally useless. They are idle and incredible panegyrics, with the features...
From: Age of Revolutions on 9 Aug 2021

Harlequin and Mother Goose, or, The golden egg

A writing sheet illustrated with scenes from Thomas Dibdin’s pantomime, first performed at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, on Boxing Day 1806, a few months before this sheet was issued. There were at least twelve different scenes in Dibdin’s work,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 9 Jul 2021

Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society

Please enjoy the recording of our second in the series of Table Talks, featuring children’s literature, labouring-class poetry, feminist polemic, creative life writing, Romantic poetry, and silver fork fiction: Thanks to Felicity James, Adam...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 21 Jun 2021

Journal of a tour in the year 1745

An anonymous journal of a tour that begins on May 14th in Warrington, Lancashire and passes through Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Lincoln, Leicester, Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge, Huntingdon, Northampton, Buckingham, Oxon, Berkshire, Hampshire, Wiltshire,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 18 Jun 2021

Cambodia’s Genocide Museum, Cambodia

Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum. Please note: You may find the story and images presented in this article deeply upsetting. Thus I wouldn’t blame you for sitting this one out. For those of you who do proceed, I’m guessing this is going to be as difficult...

The Baroness: A Novel (Part II)

By George W.M. Reynolds Originally reprinted in The Monthly Magazine, then incorporated into Master Timothy’s Bookcase. Read Part I. Chapter Three: The Notary The breakfast was at length concluded. The priest retired to his study; the two young...

The Baroness: A Novel (Part I)

By George W.M. Reynolds Chapter One: The Calais Mail It was in the middle of August, 1822, that the epoch of our tale commences.[1] The clock of the General Post Office in Paris had struck the hour of five in the afternoon, and the passengers, who...

CFP – The Hakluyt Society Symposium 2021: Decolonising Travel Studies

The Hakluyt Society Symposium 2021 Decolonising Travel Studies: Sources and Approaches 11-12 November 2021 University of Warwick (online) Deadline for submissions: 1 July 2021 Keynote: Nanjala Nyabola, Author of Travelling While...
From: Richard who? on 17 May 2021

Gay’s Fables

An engraved writing sheet illustrated with seven scenes from Gay’s Fables, each with rhyming couplet below. At head, and the largest scene, is ‘The Shepherd and the Philosopher’; six smaller scenes form the right and left borders below....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 6 May 2021

Figuring out what works

I’ve come to understand that if I don’t spend at least some time early morning with my WIP (with mug of coffee), it’s quite likely not to happen at all that day.  I have a “Cup ‘o Work” habit first thing—usually...
From: Baroque Explorations on 3 May 2021

“Flaneuring” through a morning: more research joys

It has been so long since I posted here I couldn’t figure out how to do it. My last post was at the end of October of last year, so close to six months ago. It feels more like a year to me, in part because of our molassas-slow new reality. That...
From: Baroque Explorations on 27 Apr 2021

The accomplished letter-writer; or, Universal correspondent

Title: The accomplished letter-writer; or, Universal correspondent. : Containing familiar letters on the most common occasions in life. Also a variety of more elegant letters for examples and improvement of style, from the best modern authors, together...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 7 Apr 2021

Around the Table: Publisher Chat

Welcome to the latest Around the Table! I recently had the pleasure of chatting with Karen Merikangas Darling, an Executive Editor in the Books Division at the University of Chicago Press, about the process of publishing recipes-related research. Thank...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 Apr 2021

Homework for Table Talks II

Texts and Rationales for Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society The first Table Talks event went with a bang before Christmas. You can still check out the recording here. Our next event in June promises to be just as exciting...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 31 Mar 2021

Around the Table: Museum Chat

Welcome to the latest Around the Table! Today we have a chat about the recipes-related collections at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., especially the National Museum of American History (NMAH)! I am delighted to speak with Ashley Rose...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Mar 2021

Jane Austen Made Me Do It

 It's my pleasure to welcome Zoe Wheddon, with a charming tale of Jane Austen's best friend.---oOo---‘Jane Austen made me do it’ is a refrain that we may have heard before, but in my case, it really is true. In the summer of 2017, the...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.