The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Yellow Fever"

Your search for posts with tags containing Yellow Fever found 12 posts

Loyalist Slave-Owning Refugees in Postwar Jamaica

The two forces of paternalism and slavery shaped the lives of Loyalist slaveowners in the postwar British Empire. Historians rarely connect these forces in... The post Loyalist Slave-Owning Refugees in Postwar Jamaica appeared first on Journal of the...

Yellow Fever and Church Attendance

John Adams was certain he made a mistake by going to church. Philadelphia’s yellow fever outbreak only ended in November 1793. On Sunday, December... The post Yellow Fever and Church Attendance appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Did Yellow Fever Save the United States?

To Thomas Jefferson, great plagues were within the genus of republican antibodies. Like the occasional popular insurrection that warned rulers “the spirit of resistance”... The post Did Yellow Fever Save the United States? appeared first on...

This Week on Dispatches: Geoff Smock on the Influence of the Enlightenment on Thomas Jefferson

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews teacher and JAR contributor Geoff Smock on Thomas Jefferson’s enlightenment-influenced views of  pandemics, the French Revolution, Shays’... The post This Week on Dispatches:...

Thomas Jefferson and the Public Benefits of Epidemics

An epidemic that violently attacks public health—that sickens and takes lives; that cripples our economy; that forces us into our homes; that turns cities... The post Thomas Jefferson and the Public Benefits of Epidemics appeared first on Journal...

This Week on Dispatches: Brian Patrick O’Malley on Philadelphia’s Yellow Fever Epidemic

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor Brian Patrick O’Malley on the social and medical response to the Yellow Fever epidemic that ravaged... The post This Week on Dispatches: Brian Patrick O’Malley...

Quarantines in Salem

I’m pretty familiar with the origins of the quarantine, having taught classes on or in the era of the Black Death for twenty years: quaranta (40) days that ships were required to anchor in the harbor off Venice before they could unload their...
From: streets of salem on 31 Mar 2020

The Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1793: Nine Observations and Lessons

“I often thought that the situation of a people in a bombarded city, was not much worse, and on some accounts not so bad;... The post The Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1793: Nine Observations and Lessons appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Whitall Family and the Battle of Red Bank

James W. Whitall (1717-1808) was a prominent Quaker businessman and farmer in the southern region of New Jersey. In 1739 he married Ann Cooper... The post The Whitall Family and the Battle of Red Bank appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Roundtable: Q & A with Laurie Halse Anderson

"I kept looking for well-written books that would feed my hunger to understand earlier times. And then I decided to try to write a few of my own."--Laurie Halse Anderson, on writing #FoundingFiction
From: The Junto on 9 Jun 2017

The Week in Early American History

Ramadan in America, the last passenger pigeon, history at the Supreme Court, and an interactive story of Philadelphia's yellow fever outbreak—these and more links for your reading pleasure.
From: The Junto on 29 Jun 2014

Education at Home and Abroad

 Jan Steen (1625/1626–1679)  via Wikimedia Commons Much has been written about the failure of Jamaica to establish a self-sufficient and expanding white colony during the eighteenth century by comparison with the success of the rest of the North...
From: A Parcel of Ribbons on 7 Sep 2013