The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing ale found 3941 posts

A Georgian ‘Trip Advisor’ – Part Two

Today we’re following on from the previous article by R. M Healey with some more places in London to enjoy dining in the 18th century. August 1788  Windsor Castle, Richmond.  Long has this house been in estimation. Rigby, who often formerly used...
From: All Things Georgian on 25 May 2022

Monro, Sermons Preached upon Several Occasions (1693)

Alexander Monro was a Presbyter of the Church of Scotland and Principal of the College of Edinburgh who published a number of polemical religious works between 1691 and 1696. The title page of this particular publication tells us that most of the aforesaid...

A Georgian Trip Advisor – Part One

When we’re looking for somewhere to dine out, we often use a website, such as Trip Advisor (others available, of course), but did you know that something similar existed in the 18th century? Well, today’s guest, who I am delighted to welcome, is historian...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 May 2022

May

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Mrs. SMITH takes this Method to acquaint the Ladies, That she makes up all Kind of Millenary.” When Joseph Smith relocated from New York to New Haven, he took to the pages...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 22 May 2022

May 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “New, New, New GOODS!” Less is more.  Caleb Bull, Jr., adopted that theory for his advertisement in the May 19, 1772, edition of the Connecticut Courant.  Extending only four...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 May 2022

May 18

GUEST CURATOR:  Alex Ruston What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “UMBRILLOES.” This advertisement features an item that many of us probably take for granted in the twenty-first century.  Umbrellas first appeared...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 May 2022

Welcome, Guest Curator Alex Ruston

Alex Ruston is a junior pursuing a double major in History and Theology at Assumption University in Worcester, Massachusetts.  He is originally from Syracuse, New York, where he attended Liverpool High School.  On campus Alex is actively involved in...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 May 2022

“The Chiefs Now in This City:” Indians and the Urban Frontier in Early America

“The Chiefs Now in This City:” Indians and the Urban Frontier in Early America by Colin G. Calloway (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2021) BOOK... The post “The Chiefs Now in This City:” Indians and the Urban Frontier in Early America...

May 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Acquaints the LADIES, That he has just received … A great Variety of Articles of the latest Fashions.” When William Gale received a new shipment of goods from London in the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 May 2022

Colloque international du GRHAM : “Art et amitié aux XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles en Europe” // “Art and friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe” (Paris, 14-15 juin 2022)

Colloque international du GRHAM : “Art et amitié aux XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles en Europe” // “Art and friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe” (Paris, 14-15 juin 2022) Type : colloque international. Dates de l’événement : 14 et...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 11 May 2022

Ariosto, Orlando Furioso (1634)

Still in print today, Italian poet Ludovico Ariosto’s epic poem Orlando Furioso has remained one of the most popular works of literature since its first publication in 1516. The poem continued Matteo Maria Boiardo’s unfinished multi-part Orlando Innamorato,...

William Goforth: A Life of Patriotism, Courage, and Honor

William Goforth played significant roles in New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio in the age of the American Revolution and the Early Republic and he... The post William Goforth: A Life of Patriotism, Courage, and Honor appeared first on Journal of the American...

Skirting Witches and Pirates in Salem

Walking is my preferred form of transportation in Salem, but I tread carefully: I want my path to be lined with beautiful old houses, colorful shops and lovely green (or white) spaces. Attractions exploiting the terrible tragedy of 1692 and out-of-town-yet-territorial...
From: streets of salem on 3 May 2022

The Assassination of the Czar: A Course Project Examining US Newspaper Editorials, March 1881

By E. Thomas Ewing, Stratis Bohle, Justin Noel, Tim Pfeifer, Chris Porter, and Taylor Wentzel On March 1, 1881, assassins killed Emperor Alexander II of Russia in St. Petersburg. On the following day, March 14, 1881 (in the Western calendar), newspapers...
From: Age of Revolutions on 2 May 2022

News: Not Just The Tudors

I’m delighted to have recorded another episode for Suzannah Lipscomb’s brilliant podcast, Not Just the Tudors, this time on Sir Walter Ralegh and the tragic fantasy of El Dorado. It’s available to listen to here. My previous episode, in which we...
From: Mathew Lyons on 2 May 2022

The Eminent Antiquarian

I have been meaning to post on the most eminent of Salem’s antiquarians, Henry FitzGilbert Waters (1833-1913) for a while, but I kept finding more information about him and thought I’d wait until I had the total picture: but clearly he is one of those...
From: streets of salem on 28 Apr 2022

Salem as Historyland

For the most part, this blog has been an academic release for me rather than academic engagement: I consider most of the history I’ve offered up here more pop-up than professional. But there is one academic field with which I have been engaging (mostly...
From: streets of salem on 22 Apr 2022

Summer School : « The Stones of Palermo. Cultures of Marble at the Mediterranean Crossroads » » (Palerme, 10-16 juillet 2022)

Summer School : « The Stones of Palermo. Cultures of Marble at the Mediterranean Crossroads » » (Palerme, 10-16 juillet 2022) Summer School, Palerme, 10 – 16 juillet 2022 Organisation: Université de Zurich / Institut suisse de Rome Délai pour...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 22 Apr 2022

Cyrano de Bergerac, The Comical History (1687)

By Sophie Floate In my work cataloguing the rare books of several Oxford College libraries, I come across many interesting clues as to the provenance of the books. Though some books were bought directly from the booksellers by the colleges, others...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.