The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "america"

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Your search for posts with tags containing america found 2044 posts

The Militia and Civic Community in Colonial New Brunswick: Part I, 1786-1816

Service militaire, citoyenneté et culture politique : études des milices au Canada atlantique Nous vous présentons le premier texte d’une série de contributions qui seront publiées au cours des prochaines...
From: Borealia on 18 May 2020

Why did Latin America fall behind and what explains its human geography?

Leticia Abad and I recently released a new paper, avaliable here, and which is going to be published as a chapter in an edited volume, Globalization and the Early Modern Era: An Iberian Perspective (eds. R. Doblado and A. Garcia-Hiernaux), Palgrave (forthcoming...
From: Economic Growth in History on 14 May 2020

May 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “WATT’S PSALMS … with a PREFACE of twenty four pages.” John Mein and John Fleeming, printers of the Boston Chronicle, also printed and sold “WATT’S...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 May 2020

May 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “May be had … till Capt. Schermerhorn’s Sloop sails.” The colophon for the South-Carolina and American General Gazette indicated that it was published by...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 May 2020

Big debates and economic history: the case of World War II

Economic history matters for big debates. This can be true of even historical national accounting work which to some observers can appear to be as dry a topic as any can be. Here’s an example of why it matters. In this interview with Tyler Cowen,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 11 May 2020

Women Also Know Loyalists

Rebecca Brannon, Lauren Duval, and Kacy Tillman [Welcome to part two of a conversation among three historians of the American Revolution, focusing on new directions in loyalist studies. In the first part, Professors Brannon, Duval, and Tillman discussed...
From: Borealia on 6 May 2020

Early American Women Unmasked

A special edition of #ColonialCouture, a Junto roundtable on fashion as history in early American life.  Protective face coverings have emerged as a potent, multifaceted metaphor for the Covid-19 pandemic. Despite inconsistent examples set by elected...
From: The Junto on 5 May 2020

May 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “All American Manufactures.” Thomas Shute’s advertisement occupied a privileged place in the May 4, 1770, edition of the South-Carolina Gazette.  It appeared...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 May 2020

Women Also Know Revolution

Rebecca Brannon, Lauren Duval, and Kacy Tillman [Welcome to part one of a conversation among three historians of the American Revolution, focusing on the political agency and experiences of women. In the second part, Brannon, Duval, and Tillman turn their...
From: Borealia on 4 May 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Eric Sterner on the Siege of Fort Henry

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor and writer Eric Sterner on the Siege of Fort Henry on the Virginia frontier in 1782.... The post This Week on Dispatches: Eric Sterner on the Siege of Fort Henry appeared...

Will the Real George Washington Please Stand Up?

By Andrew R. Detch Misunderstanding the American Revolution, misapplying its lessons, and misappropriating its symbols and figures is an American tradition as old as the nation itself. Jill Lepore reminded the nation of this reality years ago during the...
From: Age of Revolutions on 28 Apr 2020

April 27

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “It is impossible to carry on Business without Money.” Printers, like members of other occupations, frequently extended credit to their customers in early America. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 Apr 2020

Give Me Liberty or Give Me COVID-19: A History

By Robin Wright At the Washington state capitol in Olympia, a man wrapped in an American flag jacket held a home-made sign boldly proclaiming, “Give me liberty or give me COVID 19.” He joined thousands of protestors who came out to denounce...
From: Age of Revolutions on 27 Apr 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Andrew Zellers-Frederick on the Military Occupation of Easton

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews historian and JAR contributor Andrew Zellers-Frederick on the 0ccupation of Easton, Pennsylvania, by Continental forces gathering for... The post This Week on Dispatches: Andrew Zellers-Frederick...

It was Her Shop

Looking through classified advertisements in eighteenth-century Salem newspapers is one of my favorite pastimes: I can’t think of a better way to gain insights into the public lives of people at that time, though their private lives are,...
From: streets of salem on 18 Apr 2020

April 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Copper-Plate PRINT, containing a View of Part of the Town of Boston in New-England, and British Ships of War landing their Troops in the Year 1768.” The simultaneous...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Apr 2020

NEW ENGLANDS PROSPECT. A Gutenberg File.

The South part of New-England, as it isPlanted this yeare, 1634.A true, lively, and experimentalldescription of that part of America,commonly called New England:discovering the state of that Countrie,both as it stands to our new-comeEnglish Planters;...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 14 Apr 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.