The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "antimony"

Your search for posts with tags containing antimony found 16 posts

Witches Brew of Glass

 Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glassCourtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store.In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth...
From: Conciatore on 30 Oct 2020

Witch's Brew of Glass

Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glassCourtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store.In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth century,...
From: Conciatore on 30 Oct 2019

Deadly Fumes

Memento mori, 1605.Nikolaus Alexander  Mair von Landshut.17th century glassmaker and alchemist Antonio Neri handled very dangerous materials on a daily basis. He used strong acids, which if splattered could easily burn flesh, or cause blindness....
From: Conciatore on 22 May 2019

Tales from the Archives: ‘Infallible’ Missionary Cures

Everything seems to be unseasonably in bloom in England at the moment–blossom, daffodils, snowdrops, crocus… It is beautiful, to be sure, but horrible for us hayfever sufferers who are walking around with blossoming noses and eyes. The Recipes...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Mar 2019

Deadly Fumes

Memento mori, 1605.Nikolaus Alexander  Mair von Landshut.17th century glassmaker and alchemist Antonio Neri handled very dangerous materials on a daily basis. He used strong acids, which if splattered could easily burn flesh, or cause blindness....
From: Conciatore on 27 Jul 2018

Deadly Fumes

Memento mori, 1605.Nikolaus Alexander  Mair von Landshut. 17th century glassmaker and alchemist Antonio Neri handled very dangerous materials on a daily basis. He used strong acids, which if splattered could easily burn flesh, or cause blindness....
From: Conciatore on 1 Sep 2017

Witch's Brew of Glass

Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glass Courtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store. In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth century,...
From: Conciatore on 31 Oct 2016

Deadly Fumes

Memento mori, 1605.Nikolaus Alexander  Mair von Landshut. 17th century glassmaker and alchemist Antonio Neri handled very dangerous materials on a daily basis. He used strong acids, which if splattered could easily burn flesh, or cause blindness....
From: Conciatore on 12 Sep 2016

Witch’s Brew of Glass

Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glass Courtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store. In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth century,...
From: Conciatore on 30 Oct 2015

Deadly Fumes

  Memento mori, 1605. Nikolaus Alexander  Mair von Landshut. 17th century glassmaker and alchemist Antonio Neri handled very dangerous materials on a daily basis. He used strong acids, which if splattered could easily burn flesh,...
From: Conciatore on 18 Sep 2015

Strange glass: Vitrium Antimonii

Pure antimony During my research fellowship at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin I studied the overlap (or lack thereof) of knowledge about making coloured and stained glass in artisanal versus medical circles in the eighteenth...
From: The Medicine Chest on 26 Nov 2014

Two ‘Infallible’ Missionary Cures in Seventeenth-century Southeast Asia

Tara Alberts, University of York The life of a seventeenth-century Catholic missionary in Asia could be arduous. Many newly arrived missionaries documented their difficulties with the local climate, food, water, and troublesome insects. Above all they...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Nov 2014

Witch’s Brew of Glass

Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glassCourtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store.In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth century,...
From: Conciatore on 31 Oct 2014

Deadly Fumes Reprise

Antonio Neri handled very dangerous materials on a daily basis. He used strong acids, which if splattered could easily burn flesh, or cause blindness. He handled poisonous compounds containing arsenic, mercury and lead. If ingested, or inhaled as fumes...
From: Conciatore on 22 Sep 2014

A seventeenth-century miner’s brandy recipe

By Marieke Hendriksen Recently, I’ve been studying, amongst others, the works of a seventeenth-century Dutch bergwerker, freely translated a miner, or rather a mining specialist. Goossen van Vreeswijck (ca. 1626- after 1689) was an adventurous man,...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Apr 2014

Metallic cures: antimonial wine and mineral kermes

By Marieke Hendriksen In my previous post, I wrote about the ubiquity of mercurial drugs in the long eighteenth century. Mercury is a metal we are all quite familiar with, yet a variety of cures was based on metals and … Continue reading →
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Aug 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.