The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "antiquity"

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Your search for posts with tags containing antiquity found 52 posts

Mis-Adventures in Textbooks

In June I ordered copies of textbooks I wanted to use in my seminar this fall. At the same time, I order “instructor” or “desk” copies for me so that I could design the syllabus and plan the readings. Most of them arrived as expected. One, however,...
From: Darin Hayton on 4 Oct 2021

The recipe for animal sacrifice in ancient Greece

By Flint Dibble We’re so used to modern, twenty-first century recipes. Everything is spelled out to a tee: ingredients, amounts, instructions. But, even if you look at earlier 20th century recipes, the detail is sparser. Techniques and amounts could...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Sep 2021

Lucretius’ Plague | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. He recommends that readers, if they have not done so already, read his short article on the cultural manifestations of the Athenian Plague before reading this article. The Founding of...

Conference Report: Traditions of Materia Medica: 300BCE–1300CE

By Sean Coughlin On 16–18 June 2021, members of the research group A03 at the DFG-funded SFB 980 ‘Episteme in Motion’ and the Institute of Classical Philology, Humboldt-Universität in Berlin (Sean Coughlin, Christine Salazar, Lisa Sherbakova, Kristiane...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Aug 2021

The Athenian Plague | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. Introduction The annals of history are littered with accounts of epidemics and pandemics. One of the earliest large-scale pandemics, which affected Ancient Greece and the Middle East...

Interview with the Editors: The Cultural History of Medicine

By Elaine Leong, Lisa Smith and Laurence Totelin The Cultural History of Medicine, a six-volume collection under the direction of Roger Cooter, was published in April 2020 by Bloomsbury. The editors of three of its volumes happen to be past or present...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Jun 2021

Eggs and Invisible Ink: George and Giovanni

By Sean Coughlin In a 2015 episode of Turn, a US Revolutionary War TV drama on AMC, George Washington’s spy Abraham Woodhull uses a special ink made with alum to write secret messages under the shells of hard-boiled eggs. The technique was also advertised...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Jun 2021

A valuable ancient commodity: Miltos of Kea

By Effie Photos-Jones The island of Kea in the North Cyclades is by some travel agents’ reckoning the (rich) Athenians’ ‘best-kept secret’, their beautifully-designed stone-built villas merging seamlessly with the barren landscape overlooking...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Jun 2021

A Roman Vegetarian Substitute for Fish Sauce

By Edith Evans Roman cookery has been one of my research interests since the 1980s; I’ve accumulated a large repertoire of ancient recipes and usually do at least one live demonstration a year.  Most of the recipes include garum or liquamen – fish...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 May 2021

Monetary Capacity: some background

New voxeu column and accompanying CEPR discussion paper, covering my work in co-authorship with Roberto Bonfatti, Adam Brzezinski, and K. Kivanç Karaman. The paper touches a number of themes across economic history, historical political economy,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 27 Sep 2020

Revisiting Laurence Totelin’s Fevers and the Dog Star in Antiquity

Well, the Dog Days of summer are upon us once again…To help us cope with the heat, we revisit Laurence Totelin’s wonderful post from 2018.  In “Fevers and the Dog Star in Antiquity”, Laurence tells us about the origins of...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Jul 2020

Basel Pharmacy Museum: An Interview

The Recipes Project heads to Basel, Switzerland, to learn about the collections of the Pharmacy Museum. Laurence Totelin spoke with Philippe Wanner,  Barbara Orland, Corinne Eichenberger and Martin Kluge. Could you give us a brief overview of your...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Nov 2019

What’s In an Ancient Egyptian Makeup Bag?

By Alana Martini, published as part of the Undergraduate Series I have been fascinated by the world of cosmetics for a very long time, and it appears that I am not the only one. Our love affair with cosmetics is almost as old as humanity itself. Large...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Oct 2019

Smelling of Roses in Ancient Rome

By Laurence Totelin as part of the perfume series The painter Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912) had a knack for depicting the — sometimes imaginary — luxurious excesses of the Romans. In The Roses of Heliogabalus, he depicted a banquet hosted...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 May 2019

Nit picking the Greek and Roman way

One of the ‘joys’ of parenthood is dealing with lice and nits. In the UK, the NHS helpfully states that ‘there’s nothing you can do to prevent head lice’. You can only prevent them from spreading like wild fire. This school...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Apr 2019

A Pain in the Backside: Ancient Remedies for Haemorrhoids

By: Glyn Muitjens Although haemorrhoids are not often talked about, as many seem to consider them a source of embarrassment, they are anything but a rare condition. In fact, the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland suspects one in...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Apr 2019

Cleopatra’s Eye: The Significance of Kohl in Ancient Egypt

By Hazel Lunn Elizabeth Taylor as Cleopatra in 1963 production of Cleopatra, portraying malachite and galena kohls used in Egyptian makeup. Courtesy of http://flavorwire.com/535384/the-fashions-of-cleopatra-in-cinema Kohl has been a popular...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Nov 2018

Apicius’ Pumpkins with Turkey

By Sean Coughlin Translation: [Cooked] gourds with fowl: [add] hard-fleshed peaches, truffles, pepper, caraway, cumin, silphium, green herbs – mint, celery, coriander, pennyroyal, mentuccia –,  honey, wine, liquamen, oil and vinegar....
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Nov 2018

Thanksgiving with Galen and Apicius

By Sean Coughlin For Thanksgiving, I thought I’d come up with a new English translation of a seasonal recipe from the Roman cook-book of Apicius. It comes from the third book of De re coquinaria. The Latin is cucurbitas cum gallina. In Joseph Vehling’s...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Nov 2018

Recreating Ancient Beauty

By Eboni John, published as part of the Undergraduate Series The society of ancient Rome was just as obsessed with cosmetics and beauty as we are today. Indulging in the use of items such as white lead foundation, ash-based eye-shadow and poppy petalled...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Nov 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.