The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "archaeology"

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Your search for posts with tags containing archaeology found 308 posts

The Head of a Roman

For the past few weeks, many news outlets have reported that the skull of Pliny the Elder (Gaius Plinius Secundus, ca. 23-79 CE), the Roman naturalist and statesman who died at Pompeii, has been identified.  The latest story, in the New York Times,...
From: Anita Guerrini on 24 Feb 2020

Tanning Hides to make Leather in the 18th Century.

Tanning Hides to make Leather in the 18th Century.The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Leatherworker in Eighteenth-CenturyWilliamsburg, by Thomas K. FordThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere in the United States andmost other parts of the world at...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 24 Feb 2020

Students learn life as 18th century child. Experimental Archaeology.

Students dressed in 18th century clothing making an apple Pomander Ball.More information here: https://www.victoriaadvocate.com/news/education/students-learn-life-as-th-century-child/article_3f315b26-193b-11ea-9cce-2bc03133f052.html
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 10 Dec 2019

Bottle gourds floated to the New World from Africa

Bottle gourds floated to the New World from Africa.For thousands of years, bottle gourds have been cultivated for use the world over as drinking vessels, medicine bottles and even fishing bobs. A new study looks at how they got to the Americas from their...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 26 Nov 2019

New Additions To My Equipment.

17th-century Jamestown settlers unwind silk fiber from cocoonsdetail of a painting by NPS artist Sydney KingI know, usually I am looking to remove things from my knapsack, but I had a reason to add some things recently. A long time ago a close friend...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 13 Nov 2019

Mudlarking on the Thames, Part 2: What can we do with Fragments and Waste?

In Rubbish Theory, Michael Thompson argues that there are three kinds of value categories: ‘transient’ or ‘here today, gone tomorrow’; ‘durable’ or ‘a joy forever’; and rubbish. Things can move between categories,...
From: Middling Culture on 16 Oct 2019

Mudlarking in the Thames, Part 1: An Immediate Reflection

In the second chapter of Orhan Pamuk’s The Black Book, the novel’s elusive journalist imagines what would be discovered when Istanbul’s Bosphorus dries up: “Amid the doomsday chaos, among toppled wrecks of old City Line ferries,...
From: Middling Culture on 4 Oct 2019

How to Make Snipe Hinges

My thanks to Gus over at The Minuteman forum for the heads up on this video. Much appreciated Gus.Keith.
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 19 Sep 2019

Upcoming Books and Exhibitions for June 2019

Books Here’s a book that I missed last month, but I had to include it because I’m so happy to see more work on Thomas Harriot, an overlooked scientist from the early era of modern astronomy. As some of you might recall, I have a degree in...
From: TudorHistory.org Blog on 2 Jun 2019

17th Century Hand made cold forged brass fish hook.

17th Century Hand made cold forged brass fish hook with a brass wire leader.http://museum.wa.gov.au/maritime-archaeology-db/artefacts/gt851-copperbrass;
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 31 May 2019

Leverett Family Petticoat Returns to Colonial Williamsburg

The Leverett family quilted petticoat, reproduced from a pattern created by pricking the design onto muslin, has been returned to the makers at the Margaret Hunter Shop, Milliners and Mantuamakers at Colonial Williamsburg. The pricking was in the...
From: SilkDamask on 27 May 2019

Instructions for a voyage, 1609

A few weeks ago I looked at some manuscripts of the French intellectual and antiquarian Nicolas-Fabri de Peiresc (1580-1637) at the Bibliothèque Méjanes in Aix-en-Provence, France.  I describe Peiresc as an “intellectual”;...
From: Anita Guerrini on 26 May 2019

A French and Indian War battle inside the walls of an old home

A scene depicting a battle, possibly during the French and Indian War, was found in the walls of a 18th-century home in East Hartford. (Hartford Courant).Art experts are confounded by the image of a large, colorful tree in the center of the drawing. Some...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 21 May 2019

For Your Medical Kit. A Natural Antibiotic & More.

www.myspicer.com/history-turmeric/Hannah Glasse’s 1747 cookbook, The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy. http://www.pbs.org/food/the-history-kitchen/turmeric-history/
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 9 May 2019

The Possibility of Giants

Various large bones, discovered across Europe from around 1500 onward, raised the possibility among Renaissance naturalists and intellectuals that very large humans – some five or even ten meters tall – once existed in the past.  The...
From: Anita Guerrini on 16 Mar 2019

The Nun with Blue Teeth

I’m always looking for skeleton stories.  But it’s not often that I come across an article in the scientific literature that includes references to the ancient Greek physician and herbalist Dioscorides (ca. 40-90 CE) or the medieval abbess...
From: Anita Guerrini on 22 Jan 2019

London Ice House Discovered.

More Images Here: https://gizmodo.com/enormous-18th-century-ice-house-re-discovered-under-lon-1831360390?IR=T
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Dec 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.