The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "aristotle"

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Your search for posts with tags containing aristotle found 39 posts

The Glassmaker's Salamander

From Michael Maier's 1617 book of emblems.The salamander was thought to be born of fire.If one can say that hot-glass workers have a mascot, it is without any doubt the salamander. Since ancient times, this lizard-like, poisonous skinned amphibian...
From: Conciatore on 21 Dec 2018

A Reluctant Glassmaker

The Sun, Robert Fluddfrom Utriusque Cosmi (1617),v. 2, p. 19.(alchemical symbol for gold)Today, Antonio Neri is best known for his 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, in which he exposes the secrets of the art of making glass. In publishing his...
From: Conciatore on 9 Nov 2018

Art and Science

Jacopo Ligozzi,1518,  fanciful glass vessels,ink and watercolor on paper.Antonio Neri's writing on glassmaking and alchemy was distinguished from that of many contemporary authors in that his work was all deeply rooted in hands-on experience. He...
From: Conciatore on 2 Jul 2018

Postcard from Harvard IV: a little witness to English humanist interest

The manuscripts I have discussed so far have all been easy on the eye (as they say). The subject of today is not. Indeed, seated on the shelves alongside gorgeously illuminated presentation manuscripts, this codex might feel embarrassed by its appearance....

The Glassmaker's Salamander

From Michael Maier's 1617 book of emblems.The salamander was thought to be born of fire.If one can say that hot-glass workers have a mascot, it is without any doubt the salamander. Since ancient times, this lizard-like, poisonous skinned amphibian...
From: Conciatore on 16 Feb 2018

The Reluctant Glassmaker

The Sun, Robert Fluddfrom Utriusque Cosmi (1617),v. 2, p. 19.(alchemical symbol for gold)Today, Antonio Neri is best known for his 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, in which he exposes the secrets of the art of making glass. In publishing his...
From: Conciatore on 29 Dec 2017

Art and Science

Jacopo Ligozzi,1518,  fanciful glass vessels, ink and watercolor on paper. Antonio Neri's writing on glassmaking and alchemy was distinguished from that of many contemporary authors in that his work was all deeply rooted in hands-on experience. He...
From: Conciatore on 15 Sep 2017

Art and Science

Jacopo Ligozzi,1518,  fanciful glass vessels, ink and watercolor on paper. Antonio Neri's writing on glassmaking and alchemy was distinguished from that of many contemporary authors in that his work was all deeply rooted in hands-on experience. He...
From: Conciatore on 11 Aug 2017

The Glassmaker's Salamander

From Michael Maier's 1617 book of emblems. The salamander was thought to be born of fire. If one can say that hot-glass workers have a mascot, it is without any doubt the salamander. Since ancient times, this lizard-like, poisonous skinned amphibian...
From: Conciatore on 7 Apr 2017

The Golden Sun

The Sun, Robert Fludd from Utriusque Cosmi (1617),v. 2, p. 19. Today, Antonio Neri is best known for his 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, in which he exposes the secrets of the art of making glass. In publishing his volume, he helped to fuel...
From: Conciatore on 23 Jan 2017

Art and Science

Jacopo Ligozzi,1518,  fanciful glass vessels, ink and watercolor on paper. Antonio Neri's writing on glassmaking and alchemy was distinguished from that of many contemporary authors in that his work was all deeply rooted in hands-on experience. He...
From: Conciatore on 26 Sep 2016

History in Fragments

Today deserves a little fanfare: the latest instalment of Lost Manuscripts has been made available this morning. There are only 32 new fragments, coming from 19 host volumes, so not a full drum-roll and brass band, please — but some piano trumpetting...

Blogging Utopia (5): Arriving in Utopia

After the dialogue of Book 1 of More’s Utopia, we come to the discourse of Book 2, in which Hythloday relates his impressions of Utopia. In this fifth post, Chloë Houston explores the opening of Book 2 and the way in which its depiction of...
From: SCEMS on 12 May 2016

Salamander

From Michael Maier's 1617 book of emblems. The salamander was thought to be born of fire. If one can say that hot-glass workers have a mascot, it is without any doubt the salamander. Since ancient times, this lizard-like, poisonous skinned amphibian...
From: Conciatore on 8 Apr 2016

The ‘metacatharsis’ of Richard II

Do you ever imagine your own funeral? I don’t mean where you want your ashes scattered or what songs you’d like sung at the ceremony or even the drunken “celebration of life” you hope your loved ones throw in your memory. I mean,...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 28 Mar 2016

The Curious History of Phyllis on Aristotle

The cover story on the latest edition of Distillations, the Chemical Heritage Foundation’s excellent magazine, traces the history of truth serums and related efforts to compel people to tell a truth they might want to keep secret. The section on...
From: Darin Hayton on 19 Feb 2016

The Golden Sun

The Sun, Robert Fludd from Utriusque Cosmi (1617),v. 2, p. 19. Today, Antonio Neri is best known for his 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, in which he exposes the secrets of the art of making glass. In publishing his volume, he helped to fuel...
From: Conciatore on 27 Jan 2016

Art and Science

Jacopo Ligozzi,1518,  fanciful glass vessels,ink and watercolor on paper. Antonio Neri's writing on glassmaking and alchemy was distinguished from that of many contemporary authors in that his work was all deeply rooted in hands-on experience. He...
From: Conciatore on 23 Sep 2015

International Research Symposium: Hearing the Voice, Hearing the Soul

5th June 2015, 9.30am-6.30pm at Warwick University, the Institute of Advanced Study (IAS), Millburn House, Millburn Hill Road, CoventrySymposium themeJust as music has fascinated scholars in the Western world continuously for thousands of years, so time...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 5 Jun 2015

Salamander

From Michael Maier's book of emblems.The salamander was thought to be born of fire. If one can say that hot-glass workers have a mascot, it is without any doubt the salamander. Since ancient times, this lizard-like, poisonous skinned amphibian was...
From: Conciatore on 22 Apr 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.