The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "ballads"

Showing 1 - 20 of 73

Your search for posts with tags containing ballads found 73 posts

Poetry: The Rebellion of Wat Tyler and Jack Straw (c.1612)

Unlike that other medieval hero and man of the people, Robin Hood, Wat Tyler does not enjoy an extensive ballad “afterlife.” This song, first published in The Garland of Delight (1612), is perhaps the first proper ballad which features the...

“The Truth and Nothing But the Truth”: Its first use in popular culture

By Stephen Basdeo ‘The truth and nothing but the truth’—it’s a well-known phrase used in courts of law and most of us have probably heard it in some police procedural drama. The principle that one should not lie in a court of law...

Corpus Linguistics Course Week 1

This week I started a FutureLearn/Lancaster University course on Corpus Linguistics (CL). It runs for 8 weeks and is much more work than any of the previous FutureLearn courses that I have undertaken, so whether I’ll get to the end of it remains...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 20 Sep 2019

New Starts part

Last week I wrote about the first of my two small research projects, so this week I want to introduce the second: Fake News and Facts in Topical Ballads. This will be a digital humanities project which will use corpus data analysis to look at the links...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 13 Sep 2019

Robin Hood of the Anti-Corn Law League

By Stephen Basdeo While physical archival research remains the “bread and butter” of the work of any historian, the rise of online repositories of primary sources have proved to be of invaluable use to many a historian over the years. This...

The Female Vagrant

By Stephen Basdeo English authorities always seems to have had a harsh attitude towards its destitute and homeless people, or vagrants. At the height of the Black Death in medieval England, when labour was becoming scarce and many people, understandably,...

EFDSS Broadside Day Part 1

At the end of February, I travelled up to Glasgow to speak at the English Folk Dance and Song Society’s Broadside Day at the Unviersity of Strathclyde. This is the first in a short series of posts about the day. On Cathdral Street, Glasgow ...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 1 Mar 2019

The day I nearly be-headed the department…

by Gerrit van Honthorst, oil on canvas, 1628 It was great fun to teach on the Edge Hill Summer Residential this year.  It’s aimed at students between years 12 and 13 who are thinking of applying to do history at university (it’s one strand...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 20 Sep 2018

Review: Folk Songs in Nineteenth-Century Britain and America

David Atkinson & Steve Roud (eds.) Street Ballads in Nineteenth-Century Britain, Ireland, and North America: The Interface between Print and Oral Traditions (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2014), i-xi, 290pp. £70 (hb) ISBN 978-1-4724-2741-0. The study...

Performing Reformation Ballads in Manchester

The end of October was very busy, what with several Historical Association meetings in London as well as two public engagements.  The first of these was a speaking engagement at Ewecross, but the second was something a bit different – a 45...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 14 Dec 2017

Singing the News at Ewecross

I was delighted earlier this year to be asked to give my talk on Singing the News in mid-Tudor England at Ewecross Historical Society which meets in High Bentham on the top edge of the Forest of Bowland (being a forest, there’s no direct route there...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 6 Dec 2017

Archive work in the British Library – the way I work

At the end of September I went down to London to hear a paper by Chris Marsh at the Royal Historical Society, so I took the opportunity to travel down a bit ahead of time and spend the afternoon in the British Library.  This is something I haven’t...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 1 Dec 2017

Chris Marsh on Gender Roles in Popular Ballads

At the end of September I killed several birds with one stone by taking a short trip to London.  As well as attending a Historical Association committee meeting, I spent an afternoon in the British Library and an evening at the Royal Historical Society...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 9 Nov 2017

Back to the book

Since my children returned to school the push has been on to complete the final stages of my book manuscript.  It’s due to go to the publisher at the end of September, so I’ve been doing all the tedious things that come with completion. ...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 8 Sep 2017

Embodiment and New Materialism Part

Over the weekend of 25-26 February 2017, I attended a conference in Lancaster which looked at new materialist approaches to the pre-modern  period: ‘Embodiment and New Materialism in Premodern Literature and Culture 1350-1700’. ...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 2 Apr 2017

Turning over the pages in a ballad volume, 4o Rawl. 566

The Bodleian volume 4º Rawl. 566 is a bound set of 217 broadside ballads printed in the seventeenth century. The broadsides, half-folio sheets typical of ballad publications at the time, are attached by their left-hand edges and thus form an oblong...
From: The Conveyor on 24 Feb 2017

Anthony Wood’s annotations in Bodleian Wood 401

The antiquary, author and bibliophile Anthony Wood (1632-1695) left, among other collections, several volumes of broadside ballads to the University of Oxford. These were bequeathed to the Ashmolean Museum and transferred in 1858 to the Bodleian Library....
From: The Conveyor on 24 Feb 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.