The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "baptism"

Your search for posts with tags containing baptism found 16 posts

The Tailor-King and the Anabaptists of Munster

The spire of the church of St Lambert in Münster has three unusual adornments: cages. They were first hung on 22 January 1536 to hold the mutilated bodies of Jan Bockelson, Bernard Krechting and Bernhard Knipperdolling, surviving leaders of the Anabaptist...
From: Mathew Lyons on 22 Feb 2021

‘Jane, yt God sent us by Cutler’s maid’: the baptismal register at St Botolph Bishopsgate in the later sixteenth century

The clerk at St Botolph Bishopsgate, a large suburban parish to the north-east of London’s walls, entered the baptism of Bennett, the ‘reput[ed]’ daughter of John Allen, in the parish register in July 1596. Allen had accompanied Sir...
From: We-hang-out-a-lot-in-cemeteries on 15 May 2019

Births, baptisms and burials

An Elizabethan baptism I wrote in 2014 about the documentary records of Shakespeare’s baptism at Holy Trinity Church on 26 April 1564. There’s a lot of confusion about the actual date of Shakespeare’s birth, but at the time it was the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 26 Apr 2019

The birth and beginnings of Madame d’Aulnoy

Marie-Catherine Le Jumel de Barneville, baronne d’Aulnoy, died in Paris on January 13, 1705 – this has been known for a long time. But when was she born? The traditional answer to this question is “1650 or 1651,” based on a statement...
From: Anecdota on 30 Mar 2019

A Glassmaker's Birthday

Relief portrait of Antonio Neri,artist unknown, La Specola Museum,Florence.Alchemist, Glassmaker, and Priest Antonio Neri was born in Florence, Italy on 29 February 1576. From his baptismal record, we know the exact time of birth: "three hours and...
From: Conciatore on 1 Mar 2019

A Baptismal Apron Embroidered by Mary Woodbury, c. 1735

I thought you might enjoy the story connected with this baptismal apron, c. 1735. Currently on view in Fashioning the New England Family at the Massachusetts Historical Society (10/2018-4/2019; www.masshist.org), it was embroidered by Mary Woodbury...
From: SilkDamask on 18 Nov 2018

A Glassmaker's Birthday

Relief portrait of Antonio Neri,artist unknown, La Specola Museum,Florence.Alchemist, Glassmaker, and Priest Antonio Neri was born in Florence, Italy on 29 February 1576. From his baptismal record, we know the exact time of birth: "three hours and...
From: Conciatore on 28 Feb 2018

Sam FennApostle Spoons were usually made of silver and depicted...

Sam FennApostle Spoons were usually made of silver and depicted either one of the twelve apostles or Christ on the end of the handle. Whilst obviously decorative they were also intended to be used, perhaps for special occasions. There are examples of...

North West Early Modern Seminar in Liverpool

I recently attended the latest meeting of the North West Early Modern Seminar Series, which was held at Liverpool University on 1 November.  It came at the end of a particularly busy few days for me, so I was really quite tired, but happily there...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 18 Nov 2017

Antonio Neri's Birthday

Relief portrait of Antonio Neri, artist unknown, La Specola Museum, Florence. Glassmaker Antonio Neri was born in Florence, Italy on 29 February 1576. Because he was a "leap year baby" we celebrate the actual day of his birth only every fourth...
From: Conciatore on 27 Feb 2017

Antonio Neri's Birthday

Relief portrait of Antonio Neri, artist unknown, La Specola Museum, Florence. Glassmaker Antonio Neri was born in Florence, Italy on 29 February 1576. Because he was a "leap year baby" we celebrate the actual day of his birth only every fourth...
From: Conciatore on 29 Feb 2016

Antonio Neri's Birthday

Relief portrait of Antonio Neri,artist unknown, La Specola Museum,Florence.Glassmaker Antonio Neri was born in Florence, Italy on 29 February 1576. Because he was a "leap year baby" we celebrate on 1 March in off years. From his baptismal record,...
From: Conciatore on 27 Feb 2015

Shakespeare’s baptism at 450

The medieval font in which Shakespeare was baptised in Holy Trinity Church Saturday 26 April 2014 is the 450th Anniversary of the baptism of William Shakespeare in Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon. Doubts may be cast over his exact birthday, but...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 26 Apr 2014

Midwife or Surgeon? The obstetric choices of Quaker women in eighteenth-century Leeds

You may remember that my last post used the letters of Frances Irwin, wealthy heiress and politician, to suggest that the hegemony of male midwifery practitioners in the eighteenth century was perhaps not as total as has been previously thought.  Today...
From: The History Fox on 14 Feb 2014

Archbishop Justin Welby on Baptism and Buddhism

From The Washington Post:Some day, Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge will become the leader of the Church of England.First, he needed to become a Christian.When the newest member of Great Britain’s royal family was christened on Wednesday,...

Some things in life are free

Example from the register of St Catherine’s parish taken from FamilySearch.org, showing the baptism of a daughter to John Lee (brother of Robert Cooper Lee) and Mary Lord. It also shows the baptism of a legitimate child, the ‘bastard’...
From: A Parcel of Ribbons on 17 Aug 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.