The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing bibliography found 103 posts

What else makes a critical edition?

Material constraints in publishing can sometimes have the beneficial effect of focusing attention anew on the importance of the intellectual content of the book. As has happened so many times over the years in bringing out the Œuvres complètes...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 4 Jul 2019

Samuel Girardet’s A.B.C

While Neuchâtel’s publishers counterfeited many editions, they were not immune from having their own original editions ripped-off elsewhere. The Le Locle bookseller Samuel Girardet’s school primer Nouvelle méthode d’enseigner...
From: Selling Enlightenment on 26 Feb 2019

Le ‘Voltaire de Beuchot’ à la lettre: sources d’une édition savante sous la Restauration

Œuvres de Voltaire, Beuchot (éd.), Paris, Lefèvre, t.1, 1834. BnF. Si elle n’égale celle du patriarche ni par son ampleur, ni par son lustre, ni par la célébrité de ses intervenants, la correspondance...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 3 Jul 2018

"Depth of Field: New Dimensions in the Study of Early Modern Books" #mla19

The deep bite of type on the recto of the title page of The Trial of Chivalry (1605), STC 24935a, Folger Shakespeare Library. It has been a while since I have posted anything here, but my writing...

The Game of Hope: a bibliography

This bibliography is the list of books and magazine articles I consulted in writing The Game of Hope. Some of them I consumed, others I simply scanned, looking for one particular fact. There are a number I’ve not listed — the annotated works...
From: Baroque Explorations on 30 Mar 2018

Stephen H. Grant on “Collecting Shakespeare”

Stephen H. Grant, distinguished member of and longtime contributor to the Blogging Shakespeare community talks about Henry and Emily Folger, and their lifelong engagement of collecting Shakespeare. The post Stephen H. Grant on “Collecting Shakespeare”...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 7 Mar 2018

Giants of the Grand Siècle

So what’s new in the world of EMEM historiography? The French are on the attack. Sure, English historians continue to dominate the fiscal-military side of the ledger, as well as war-and-society topics. And, yes, the Germans continue their...
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 25 Jan 2018

17 Publication Wrap-Up

For those still keeping score, there are a couple of EMEMH publications worth mentioning in the second half of 2017. In a particular order: Drévillon, Hervé, Bertrand Fonck and Jean-Philippe Cénat, eds. Les dernières...
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 28 Dec 2017

Information Networks in the Age of Revolutions Bibliography

“(In)forming Revolution: Information Networks in the Age of Revolutions” Bibliography As we bring this series to a close, we asked its participants which books and articles they would include in a brief bibliography on communication networks...
From: Age of Revolutions on 4 Oct 2017

The Flood continues

Anybody else notice the explosion in edited collections over the past X number of years? I assume it has to something to do with the publishing market, but I wouldn’t be surprised if changes in academia, namely the recent incentivization of...
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 21 May 2017

And the printing presses keep on churning

An early year bibliography review, including books soon-to-appear. Forssberg, Anna Maria. The Story of War: Church and Propaganda in France and Sweden 1610–1710. Lund, Sweden: Nordic Academic Press, 2017. Abstract: ”O God we thank thee”...
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 16 Jan 2017

Voltaire editor, edited and re-edited

The first posthumous edition of Voltaire’s complete works, printed in Kehl in 1784 and financed by Beaumarchais, was recently the subject of a 900-page thesis (Linda Gil, Paris-Sorbonne, 2014). The latest volume of the Œuvres complètes...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 7 Nov 2016

Catch up, Fall 2016 edition

Finished revisions for “More Honored in the Breach?” siege capitulation chapter? Check. Edited more chapters in World of the Siege collection? Check. Read through (half of) Gillian Rose’s Visual Methodologies (4th ed.)...
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 16 Sep 2016

Edward Phillips’s bio-bibliography of women in Theatrum Poetarum (1675)

Theatrum Poetarum (1675) is a bio-bibliography of classical, medieval, and early modern poets compiled by Edward Phillips and published by Charles Smith. Although the volume seems to have been printed only once, at least fifty copies are known to survive....
From: RECIRC on 2 Sep 2016

Late Summer Reading

As usual, us academics are in frantic end-of-summer research clean-up mode. So in the meantime I’ll mention some recent(ish) works of EMEMH interest. First up, the latest Journal of Military History has two articles of note: Tzoref-Ashkenazi, Chen....
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 5 Aug 2016

Doni Tondo Bibliography

This week I have put the latest version of my interpretation of Michelangelo's Doni Tondo on my website, MyGiorgione. Last year at Giorgione et al... I published an initial exploration of the famous painting but then followed it with four essays revising...
From: Giorgione et al... on 11 Jul 2016

Live-Tweeting The One King Lear

  Three weeks ago I had what seemed like a fun idea at the time: I’d live-tweet a steady stream of my responses to Brian Vickers’s — sorry: Sir Brian Vickers’s — new work of counter-revisionist literary/textual/theatre...
From: dispositio on 2 Jun 2016

Early Summer Reading

In case you need to add anything to your summer reading list, the following (recent and not-so-recent) publications are available for your perusal*: Hamilton, Douglas J., and Douglas Macinnes, eds. Jacobitism, Enlightenment and Empire, 1680-1820. London:...
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 2 Jun 2016

And the publications keep on coming

In case your “To Read” shelves (both real and virtual) have any empty space available. Doesn’t matter whether your inclinations are navally fiscal, memorably lowland, knowingly engineered, or absolutely official,...
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 9 Apr 2016

The social history of military technology

has a dedicated journal.   Or for a readable version, go here.
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 5 Apr 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.