The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "book history"

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Your search for posts with tags containing book history found 156 posts

VIDEO: Early Modern Typography / Race / Gender (Bibliographical Society of America)

In 2021, the Bibliographical Society of America graciously hosted a conversation about the intersection of typography (specifically, how typography was/is described, discussed, and understood to function culturally and politically) with discourses of...

VIDEO: Wing Foundation Lecture on the History of the Book (Newberry Library)

I was honored to deliver the Wing Foundation Lecture on the History of the Book at the Newberry Library on March 3, 2022. The event took place in person after two years of virtual events. I’m grateful to Jill Gage, Custodian of the John M. Wing Foundation...

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Cambridge Elements in Shakespeare and Text

Image courtesy of Aaron T. Pratt, Harry Ransom Center (University of Texas at Austin). Along with my co-editor Rory Loughnane (University of Kent), I am delighted to invite proposals for Cambridge...

SHAKESPEARE / TEXT: Contemporary Readings in Textual Studies, Editing, & Performance

One of the great highlights of the difficult last few years was editing Shakespeare / Text, a collection of twenty agenda-setting essays about the study and use of the Shakespearean text over time and in our time. The collection was published in 2021...

OUT NOW! Typographies of Performance in Early Modern England

My first monograph Typographies of Performance in Early Modern England was published by Oxford University Press in 2020. It is the first book-length study of early modern English playbook typography and tells a new history of drama from the period by...

Renaissance science – XXXV

Whether they were introducing materia medica into the medical curriculum at the universities, going out into the countryside to search for and study plants for themselves, leading students on field trips to do the same, establishing and developing botanical...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 18 May 2022

Roughing It in the Bush: The Politics of the Book in Early Canada

Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy In Imagined Communities, the seminal study of the emergence of national feeling, Benedict Anderson devoted a chapter to the case of creole nationalism. He linked the rise of nationalism and republicanism with the rise of a literate...
From: Borealia on 7 Feb 2022

Renaissance Science – XXI

One of the products of the Republic of Letters during the Humanist Renaissance was the beginning or the foundation of the modern European library. Naturally they didn’t invent libraries; the concept of the library goes back quite a long way into antiquity....
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 20 Oct 2021

Renaissance Science – XIX

The publication of Vesalius’ De fabrica certainly marks a major change in the study and teaching of anatomy at the medieval university, but, as I hope is clear, that change did not come out of thin air but was the result of a couple of centuries of...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 22 Sep 2021

Renaissance Science – XVIII

One area of knowledge that changed substantially during the Renaissance was the study of medicine and the branch of medicine that probably changed the most was anatomy. This change has produced two notable myths that need to be quickly dealt with before...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 8 Sep 2021

Renaissance Science – XIV

In the previous episode we saw how the Renaissance rediscovery of Vitruvius’ De architectura influenced the development of architecture during the Renaissance and dissolved the boundary between the intellectual theoreticians and the practical artisans....
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 14 Jul 2021

Renaissance Science – VII

In the last post we looked at the European re-invention of moveable-type and the advent of the printed book, which played a highly significant role in the history of science in general and in Renaissance science in particular. I also emphasised the various...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 7 Apr 2021

Renaissance Science – VI

There is no doubt that the fifteenth and sixteenth century introduction of print technologies in Europe, making possible the advent of the printed book, was one of the most important developments in the history of not just Renaissance science, but the...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 24 Mar 2021

Renaissance Science – II

The so-called Scientific Renaissance at the beginning of the High Middle Ages was truly a renaissance in the sense of the rediscovery or re-emergence of the, predominantly Greek, intellectual culture of antiquity albeit, much of it in this case,...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 27 Jan 2021

The man who printed the world of plants

Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598) is justifiably famous for having produced the world’s first modern atlas, that is a bound, printed, uniform collection of maps, his Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. Ortelius was a wealthy businessman and paid for the publication...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 20 Jan 2021

The Readers called Methodists: A Review of Pulpit, Press, and Politics

Todd Webb Scott McLaren, Pulpit, Press, and Politics: Methodists and the Market for Books in Upper Canada (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019) By the early 1860s, Methodism had become the largest Protestant denomination in the future provinces...
From: Borealia on 14 Sep 2020

VIDEO: Re-Reading Milton Re-Reading Shakespeare (SRS • June 30, 2020)

Yesterday, Jason Scott-Warren (Cambridge University) and I presented some updated findings about—and readings of—the marked up copy of Mr William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies (1623), aka the First Folio, housed in the Rare...

The Unquiet Hymnbook in the Early United States

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Christopher N. Phillips It’s not much to look at....
From: Age of Revolutions on 2 Mar 2020

Winter School: Archival Research Skills and Book History, 2-3rd December, University of Limerick

The Centre for Early Modern Studies, Limerick, presents the 2nd Winter School in Archival Research Skills & Book History 2nd – 3rd December 2019 Supported by the AHSS Teaching Board   Venue: University of Limerick, Glucksman Library...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 12 Nov 2019

Milton's Shakespeare: A Digest of Media Coverage

Suggested emendations to the text of ‘Romeo & Juliet’ in the Free Library of Philadelphia’s First Folio. [Reproduced with kind permission of the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Rare Book Department.] ...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.