The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "book reviews"

Showing 1 - 20 of 424

Your search for posts with tags containing book reviews found 424 posts

A Critical Review in The Critical Review

In 1764 James Otis, Jr., published The Rights of the British Colonies Asserted and Proved, which based the campaign against Parliament’s new colonial revenue laws on the ideas of natural rights and (though this term wouldn’t be formulated...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Nov 2020

Atlas of Boston History Wins Historic New England Book Prize

Historic New England (formerly the Society for the Protection of New England Antiquities) has awarded its 2020 Book Prize to The Atlas of Boston History, edited by Nancy S. Seasholes and written by her and a bevy of contributors, including me. The society...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Nov 2020

You can con all of the people some of the time, and some of the people all of the time, but you can’t con all of the people all of the time. However, you can con enough people long enough to cause a financial crisis.

  The name Isaac Newton evokes for most people the discovery of the law of gravity[1] and if they remember enough of their school physics his three laws of motion. For those with some knowledge of the history of mathematics his name is also connected...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 11 Nov 2020

A London View of the Electoral College Controversy

At the London School of Economics blog, Kyle Scott reviewed Prof. Alexander Keyssar’s new book, Why Do We Still Have the Electoral College?Dr. Scott wrote: Throughout the book, Keyssar draws upon congressional testimony, third party research and...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Nov 2020

A book or many books?

If you count mathematics as one of the sciences, and I do, then without any doubt the most often reissued science textbook of all time has to be The Elements of Euclid. As B L van der Waerden wrote in his Encyclopaedia Britannica article on Euclid:...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 14 Oct 2020

Book Review: ‘Mistresses’ by Linda Porter

Mistresses: Sex and Scandal at the Court of Charles II, written by historian Linda Porter and published by Picador in 2020, is the second book on the Stuarts of the seventeenth century by Dr Porter, the first being, Royal Renegades: The Children of Charles...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 9 Oct 2020

A Different Royal Society

What do the Penny Post, the Great Exhibition of 1851, the Albert & Victoria Museum, GCSEs, the iMac and the art works on the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square all have in common? Their origins are all in someway connected to the Royal Society for...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 16 Sep 2020

The Readers called Methodists: A Review of Pulpit, Press, and Politics

Todd Webb Scott McLaren, Pulpit, Press, and Politics: Methodists and the Market for Books in Upper Canada (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019) By the early 1860s, Methodism had become the largest Protestant denomination in the future provinces...
From: Borealia on 14 Sep 2020

A scientific Dutchman

For many decades the popular narrative version of the scientific revolution started in Poland/Germany with Copernicus moving on through Tycho in Denmark, Kepler in Germany/Austria, Galileo et al in Northern Italy, Descartes, Pascal, Mersenne etc., in...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 20 Aug 2020

Book Review: ‘The Bitter Trade’ by Piers Alexander

I came across a Facebook post by historical fiction author Kate Quinn recently in which she wrote: ‘sometimes we come across books at the wrong time. We’re in the wrong mood for a particular book at a particular time, or we’re at the...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 15 Aug 2020

Our medieval technological inheritance.

“Positively medieval” has become a universal put down for everything considered backward, ignorant, dirty, primitive, bigoted, intolerant or just simply stupid in our times. This is based on a false historical perspective that paints the Middle...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 22 Jul 2020

We just don’t know!

Matthew Cobb is one of those people that you can’t help but admire but also secretly hate just a little bit for being so awesome. He is professor for zoology at the University of Manchester with a sizable teaching load that he apparently masters...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 24 Jun 2020

Another Negative Review

For those, who don’t always read the comments, Renaissance Mathematicus friend and sometime guest blogger, Chris Graney, who is also a leading expert on the arguments pro and contra heliocentricity in the early 17th century, has written another...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 7 Jun 2020

Charles Royster and the Rage Militaire

The historian Charles Royster died in early February. He was the author of Light-Horse Harry Lee and the Legacy of the American Revolution (1981), The Fabulous History of the Dismal Swamp Company: A Story of George Washington’s Time (1999), and...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Jun 2020

Book Review: ‘The Tragic Daughters of Charles I’ by Sarah-Beth Watkins

Far more has been written about the sons of King Charles I and his queen, Henrietta Maria, than about the daughters who were born of the couple—perhaps understandably, since both Charles and James became kings. But with such works as Lady Katherine...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 30 May 2020

Galileo sources: a starter kit

Following my last post, numerous people have asked me for book recommendations on Galileo and his opponents. What follows is a list of books that I have and have consulted to create my Galileo. I should add that over the years I have also read a cartload...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 30 May 2020

Arming America: How “the Controversy Arose”

As I described yesterday, in 2002 Emory University asked three outside scholars to investigate charges of “failures of scholarly care and integrity” against Michael Bellesiles, author of Arming America.Those scholars were academic heavyweights:...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 May 2020

Arming America Twenty Years On

As my Sestercentennial postings from last fall recounted, the last part of the year 1769 in Boston was punctuated with gunfire:a shot from a British soldier’s musket during the Neck Riot.two pistol shots during the merchants’ assault on John...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 May 2020

Online Events and Videos While We Stay Home

With the pandemic, almost every historical site, museum, and society that hosted events has now pivoted to organizing and promoting online events. Sometimes that means an interview with a historian or other expert at home, produced over a platform like...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 May 2020

Page 1 of 22123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.