The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "britain"

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Your search for posts with tags containing britain found 226 posts

The entertaining performances of the election jugglers

Title: The entertaining performances of the election jugglers. Parts I and II. In which are introduced the celebrated characters of Mr. Louis. Publication: Nottingham : Printed by Sutton and Son, 1819. Catalog Record 64 N849 818 Acquired November 2020
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 8 Nov 2021

The life of a Norfolk dumpling

An attack upon Robert Walpole. With allusions to the Craftsman and lack of any to Walpole’s excise suggest this pamphlet was written and published after 1727 and before 1733.   Title: The life of a Norfolk dumpling, alias a Norfolk ——— : containing,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 22 Sep 2021

CFP: International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds

International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds: Britain’s Border Geographies University of Leeds 4-7 July 2022 This series of three panels is sponsored by the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol, and the Medieval and Early Modern...
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 16 Aug 2021

Reform : a dialogue

Title: Reform : a dialogue. Published: Liverpool : Published at the Courier-office, and to be had of the principal booksellers, 1819. Catalog Record 763 819 R332 Acquired November 2020
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 4 Aug 2021

The Royal Family of Great Britain

“Portraits of George II, Queen Caroline, Prince Frederick, Princesses Anne, Amelia, Caroline, Prince William, Princesses Mary and Louise, all busts in ovals arranged in three rows of three.”–British Museum online catalogue.   Title: The Royal...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 2 Jun 2021

Memoirs of Mrs. Fitzherbert

Extra-illustrated with the addition of 54 portraits and views (some hand-colored) ranging in date from the late 18th to the late 19th century, inlaid to size. Also bound in at the end is a publisher’s catalog (45, [3] pages) dated New Burlington Street,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 18 May 2021

Forget Leaving Room for Jesus: Fornication and Community Control in Transitional New England

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 23 Feb 2021

A Cross-Channel Marriage in Limbo: Alexandre d’Arblay, Frances Burney, and the Risks of Revolutionary Migration

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Kelly Summers In late 1801, as the prospect...
From: Age of Revolutions on 25 Jan 2021

Cromwell Museum’s Winter Lecture Series

Hear ye! Earlier this evening, historian Paul Lay was the first speaker in the Cromwell Museum’s Winter Lecture Series and gave a really fascinating talk about the West Indies during the time of the Cromwellian Protectorate, with figures such as...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 14 Jan 2021

The Magiconomy of Early Modern England

New blogpost written for the Forms of Labour Project examining evidence from county quarter sessions court depositions of magic as a service industry. Featuring magical work activities, divination down-payments, and a wizard named Blind Burnie. via...
From: Ludicrus Histories on 5 Nov 2020

Maternal Impressions

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 28 Sep 2020

Revisiting Lisa Smith’s Coffee: A Remedy Against the Plague

Editor’s note: Today, we revisit a post by our editor Lisa Smith on the use of coffee as an eighteenth century cure-all against smallpox and the plague. The botanist Richard Bradley claimed that coffee would be effective in treating such diseases...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 May 2020

‘Britain’s Black Past’ by Professor Gretchen Gerzina

Today, I am delighted to welcome to All Things Georgian, Professor Gretchen Holbrook Gerzina whose new book, ‘Britain’s Black Past‘ has just been published by Liverpool University Press and is also available from Amazon. Our paths crossed...
From: All Things Georgian on 15 Apr 2020

France and Spain Invade England—Almost

On February 6, 1778, France signed two treaties with the United States, one of Amity and Commerce, the other, a defensive Alliance.[1] In them, France... The post France and Spain Invade England—Almost appeared first on Journal of the American...

January 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The whole taken from the Boston Chronicle, in which they were first published.” Newspaper printers participated in networks of exchange in eighteenth-century America,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Jan 2020

: the Commemorative Year

One of the major themes of this blog has been how we remember history: what we choose to remember, what we choose to celebrate (or exploit), and what we choose to forget or ignore. This year promises to be very interesting in the realm of “anniversary...
From: streets of salem on 1 Jan 2020

Bored Now: or, Captain Blood Plays Another Game of Solitaire

Maritime history has provided me with many satisfying and pleasurable moments since I started studying it seriously *cough* years ago, but there’s something a bit special about chairing a conference session where [a] all the speakers are running...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 10 Sep 2019

Exhibition Review: “Food: Bigger than the Plate”

By Catherine Price The Food: Bigger than the Plate exhibition is taking place at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London from May until October 2019. The exhibition takes you on a journey through the four zones of Composting; Farming; Trading; and Eating....
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Aug 2019

A nautical impromptu

Satire with two naval officers (one of whom is the Duke of Clarence caricatured, with heavy jowl, protruding lips, and small slanting eye) abusing each other at table, observed by a civilian who winks and holds a finger to the side of his nose. The naval...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 17 May 2019

Winning the War with Eau de Cologne

By Jess Clark a part of the Perfumes Series In August 1914, Britain declared war on Germany. As many historians compellingly argue, the Great War was a point of major military, political, and socio-cultural disruption. This extended to commercial relationships...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 May 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.