The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "celebrity"

Your search for posts with tags containing celebrity found 10 posts

Clementi and the woman at the piano

Erin Helyard’s Clementi and the woman at the piano is the June volume in the Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment series. This book explores how Clementi afforded female pianists a new and radical style of performance. In this blog post,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 28 Jul 2022

September

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Sold (by appointment of Mr. Hemet) … at William Scott’s Irish Linnen Store … in New England.” Readers of the New-Hampshire Gazette learned that Jacob Hemet, “DENTIST...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 20 Sep 2021

September 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “George Spriggs, Gardner to John Hancock, Esq.” In the early 1770s, George Spriggs supplied colonists with fruit trees.  In September 1771, he placed advertisements in the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Sep 2021

FT: Dead Famous by Greg Jenner

On Guy Fawkes’ Night in 1709, Henry Sacheverell, an Anglican minister, preached an incediary sermon in St Paul’s against religious non-conformity in the church. It was widely interpreted as a coded attack on the then Whig government, not least...
From: Mathew Lyons on 25 Apr 2020

February 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “George Spriggs, Gardener to JOHN HANCOCK, Esq.” As spring approached in 1770, the appropriately named George Spriggs took to the pages of the Boston-Gazette to...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Feb 2020

Celebrity Couture: A New Trend? Fashionista Mary Robinson Led the Way – Over 230 Years Ago

Figure 1.  John Hoppner, Mary Robinson as Perdita (1782), Chawton House Library.   Sean John, DASH, Material Girl, William Rast, OVO, House of Harlow, Yeezy, Paper Crown, the Jessica Simpson Collection, Rocawear, The Row, Twenty8Twelve.  Celebrity...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 1 Aug 2017

Up Close and Personal: Celebrity Politicians and Modern Democracy

Image: Image: William Hogarth, A Just View of the British Stage (Undated, c18, collection of the V&A).By Rebecca Tierney-Hynes, University of Waterloo The recent US election has made us all think about what it means to combine politics and celebrity,...
From: Histories of Emotion on 1 Dec 2016

Celebrity Antiques Roadtrip

I’ve just filmed Celebrity Antiques Roadtrip. I was competing against my friend, Kate Williams, and my expert was David Harper....
From: Suzannah Lipscomb on 10 Jul 2016

Public figures: the invention of celebrity in the eighteenth century

Le lever de Voltaire par Jean Huber, 1772. Musée de l’Hermitage. In his Lever de Voltaire of 1772 Jean Huber depicted the philosophe getting dressed in a somewhat awkward position. The picture was a great success: it was engraved in Paris...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 24 Jun 2015

Lady Cecily Stonor of Stonor Park

The Church of Saint Mary the Virgin in Oxford, where the distribution of Catholic literature helped expose Lady Cecily's devotion to her faith A few months ago, I fell into a conversation about heroism and whether it still serves a purpose. In his...
From: Confessions of a Ci-Devant on 15 Jun 2015

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.