The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing change found 194 posts

The Curing Chocolate of Antonio Colmenero de Ledesma of 1631

By R.A. Kashanipour “The number of people drink who chocolate is vast,” wrote the seventeenth century Spaniard, Antonio Colmenero de Ledesma, “not only in the Indies, where the beverage originated, but also in Spain, Italy and Flanders,...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Apr 2021

Rencontres du Centre André Chastel : « La maison Changenet. Une famille de peintres entre Avignon, Marseille et Dijon vers 1500 » (en ligne, 14 avril 2021)

Jean Changenet, Les Trois Prophètes, Avignon, 1484 ?, noyer, 61 x 95 cm. Paris, musée du Louvre, INV. 1992. À l’occasion de la parution de l’ouvrage La Maison Changenet. Une famille de peintres entre Provence et Bourgogne...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 29 Mar 2021

My Soda Bread

By Kathleen Lynch There was something wrong about the package that was delivered to me at work one early spring morning years ago. It was addressed to me, and the return address also had my surname. But I didn’t recognize the name as a family member,...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Mar 2021

Histoire de l’art, 86, Isabelle Le Pape et Yannick Le Pape, « Il cosmopolita campo delle idee »

Histoire de l’art, 86 : Grèce(s), 2020/2 VARIA Isabelle Le Pape et Yannick Le Pape « Il cosmopolita campo delle idee ». Modèles, méandres et métamorphoses de la Biennale de Venise Depuis la première...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 22 Mar 2021

Mary Pyke (fl. 1669 – 1709)

Mary Pyke was a silkwoman and milliner on the Royal Exchange in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Winter en Zomer, Wenceslaus Hollar, 1643 RP-P-OB-11.250 Public domain in the collection of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam Mary Pyke...
From: A Fashionable Business on 8 Mar 2021

Incredible Insults and Hardships: The Hostage Experience of Ebenezer Sullivan

When twenty-three-year-old Capt. Ebenezer Sullivan nobly volunteered himself as a prisoner-exchange hostage in the last weeks of the Canadian invasion, he had no way... The post Incredible Insults and Hardships: The Hostage Experience of Ebenezer Sullivan...

December 24

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Royal Exchange Tavern … will be opened this Day as a COFFEE-HOUSE.” When Abigail Stoneman opened a new coffeehouse in Boston in December 1770, she attempted...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Dec 2020

Tales from the Archives: Was There a Recipe for Korean Ginseng?

By Daniel Trambaiolo As all of us continue to watch the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, and wait with cautious optimism for a time when we can heal and recover, I’d like to take a moment to revisit another medical breakthrough that required patience of...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Dec 2020

Judith Gresham the younger (1662 – 1728)

Judith Gresham the younger was a freemen of the Painter-Stainers’ Company and milliner on the Royal Exchange. Baptised on 25 November 1662 in the parish of St Peter le Poer, she was the daughter of Judith Beckingham and Seliard Gresham.[1] She...
From: A Fashionable Business on 15 Nov 2020

Mary Gresham (1668 – 1726)

Mary Gresham was a milliner and freemen of the Painter-Stainers’ Company working on the Royal Exchange in London. The daughter of Judith Beckingham and Seliard Gresham, Mary Gresham was baptised on 6 December 1668 and she worked with her mother...
From: A Fashionable Business on 15 Nov 2020

Judith Gresham (1632 – 1694)

Judith Gresham was a milliner on the Royal Exchange in the late seventeenth century. Judith Beckingham and Seliard Gresham were married on 26 February 1660 and thereafter had five children.[1] They were long-standing tenants of the Royal Exchange...
From: A Fashionable Business on 15 Nov 2020

Appel à communication : « Le Corps helvétique et la France (1660-1792). Transferts, asymétries et interdépendances entre des partenaires inégaux » (Colloque de la Société Suisse pour l’Étude du XVIIIe Siècle (SSEDS), 28-30 avril 2022)

Appel à communication : « Le Corps helvétique et la France (1660-1792). Transferts, asymétries et interdépendances entre des partenaires inégaux » (Colloque de la Société Suisse pour...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 2 Nov 2020

The Magic of Socotran Aloe

By Shireen Hamza “The people of this island are without faith — and they are strong magicians. They originate from Greece.” What? I had been flipping through Ikhtiyārāt-i Badī‘ī, a Persian pharmaceutical manuscript...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Oct 2020

Drinking the Ink of Prayer

By Genie Yoo  [1] Sometimes historians dream of moments of recognition in the manuscripts they encounter. The act of reading or reciting, writing or copying, can trigger a distant memory, allowing one to draw a line connecting two seemingly unrelated...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Oct 2020

Séance du séminaire Collection : « Carl Jacobsen et la collection française de la Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek à Copenhague », 22 septembre 2020 (en ligne)

En ligne, 18h30-20h00 Intervenant : Nicholas Parkinson (Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek) À l’entrée du musée copenhaguois Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, une sculpture occupe le devant de la scène – Gloria Victis, ou « gloire...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 11 Sep 2020

Revisiting Christopher Heaney’s How to Make an Inca Mummy

In this last “revisiting” post in our August 2020 series, we return to a piece by Christopher Heaney in 2016 to learn about sixteenth-century Europeans and their use of the dead in medical recipes. Practitioners believed that preserved bodies...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Aug 2020

Revisiting Carla Nappi’s “Translating Recipes 1: Narrating Qing Bodies”

Editor’s Note: Today we revisit a classic post from our archives on Late Imperial China by Carla Nappi, which sits the intersection of medicine and storytelling. “Narrating Qing Bodies” kicked off an extended series of translations and...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Apr 2020

Letter, 18th April 1840: to John Russell Smith

Great Totham Hall near Witham April 18th 1840 Dr Sir, Just as it always is! I now find that I shall not be able to send you the promised parcel of “Bokes” for a fortnight from their time! “What a fellow that Clark is!” methinks...
From: Finding Charles Clark on 16 Apr 2020

Margaret Lendall, fl. 1660-1668

Margaret Lendall was a Haberdashers’ Company apprentice milliner/lace-seller who worked on the Royal Exchange in 1660s London. Robert White, The Royal Exchange of London, 1671 © The Trustees of the British Museum, 1880,1113.3683 In October...
From: A Fashionable Business on 20 Mar 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.